Passwords, watchwords, secrets, The Fine Print — access to ideas more than might and more than money is the origin of power, as the saying goes-ish. Sometimes it’s almost batfuck loco how much power information contains. Kierkegaard: People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for freedom of thought, which they seldom use. 
The ability to think what you want, to share ideas with other people is freedom encompassed. It’s also sexy and exciting to hear and see and read different people’s takes on the ticks and clicks of life functioning all around us.
Maybe nothing feels so chest-burstingly beautiful as making sure we all have access to the knowledge and tools to control our own thoughts and lives and educations and spirits and voices.
The two biggest public expansions of information in human history, the printed word and the internet, need some love. In the US, the internet’s under siege right now, and right now it’s also Banned Books Week. If you have a nice library or a superfast friendly phone, all the more reason to help extend those rights to folks who don’t. 

Passwords, watchwords, secrets, The Fine Print — access to ideas more than might and more than money is the origin of power, as the saying goes-ish. Sometimes it’s almost batfuck loco how much power information contains. Kierkegaard: People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for freedom of thought, which they seldom use. 

The ability to think what you want, to share ideas with other people is freedom encompassed. It’s also sexy and exciting to hear and see and read different people’s takes on the ticks and clicks of life functioning all around us.

Maybe nothing feels so chest-burstingly beautiful as making sure we all have access to the knowledge and tools to control our own thoughts and lives and educations and spirits and voices.

The two biggest public expansions of information in human history, the printed word and the internet, need some love. In the US, the internet’s under siege right now, and right now it’s also Banned Books Week. If you have a nice library or a superfast friendly phone, all the more reason to help extend those rights to folks who don’t. 


Running through the Louvre, Band of Outsiders, Jean Luc Godard.

Running through the Louvre, Band of Outsiders, Jean Luc Godard.


Los Angeles
FIVE THINGS:
Man, myth, baritone legend and brain-heavy old friend Reggie Watts* hung out after his all-improvised set last Thursday at Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles for some free-associating. The real genius lives in the negative space.


* This is not a self-portrait.

Los Angeles

FIVE THINGS:

Man, myth, baritone legend and brain-heavy old friend Reggie Watts* hung out after his all-improvised set last Thursday at Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles for some free-associating. The real genius lives in the negative space.

* This is not a self-portrait.


I wonder if leaves feel lonely when they see their neighbors falling — John Muir


INTERVIEW: KEN BURNS, PART II OF III.

image

Last week we posted the first part of our very own Kelly Sawdon in conversation with the luminous Ken Burns. His new seriesThe Roosevelts, is wrapping up on PBS about now. Here’s part two. 

You create complex narratives very successfully. How do ethics play into your vision or execution as a filmmaker?

I think there’s a very complex dynamic with regard to ethics. It’s very hard to articulate because what we’re doing is we’re taking still photographs and archival evidence from the past, and trying to figure out how to tell a story. Take for example our civil war film. It’s eleven and a half hours long.

Most of the time there’s battles going on and yet there’s not a single still photograph of battles taken during the civil war. So, we had to invoke some sort of frenetic approach — a quick cut, a detail on the cannon, and troops marching, and the glimmer of bayonets. If you cut them well enough, it gives a semblance of battle, the sound effects and complex narrative.

We’re serving a larger truth, but you’re on an ethical line and you’re constantly struggling. It’s really terrific, but if it’s too much we’ll pull back or we’ll say you know what, let’s not do that.

We made a film on Louis and Clark and those photographs or even paintings of the Indians when they saw them visiting, but there are later paintings and there are later photographs, which we used. Even though there’s a temporal dislocation of 60 or 70 years, it was more important to represent what the Shoshone tribe looked like than not do anything or to do some God awful reenactment. If you’re going to do reenactments, you might as well just make a feature film.

You spent considerable time investigating your subjects and after spending seven plus years on those topics, do you still find them fascinating? Do you continue to study them after you’ve completed a series?

You know it’s interesting; they’re like your kids. I feel so privileged that working in this way, being able to focus for as long and as intensely as we do. The great question people ask, don’t you get bored — it’s exactly the opposite. The more I work on something, the closer and closer I get to it. Just like the kid you send off to college, they’re on their own, they’ve got a life of their own.

The film’s released — it’s basically what’s more important right now is your feelings about the film, not mine. Yet, we stay with them and we learn more, and ever more you think about it in different ways, you actually go back and look at the film and see aspects of them that you may not have been consciously intended, or given off by the film. That’s very exciting to me.

Then after you’ve finished a series, has a fact that you weren’t aware ever come to light that would have impacted the direction you took on that subject matter? 

Yes, it’s happened in a few instances and I’ve been very, very relieved as… a lot of contemporary documentaries are relatively temporal. Michael Moore’s Roger and Me is essentially for the General Motors of the ‘80s. That’s limiting in some ways as he presents it as universal.

I made a film on Thomas Jefferson and it was soon afterwards discovered that he was 100% confirmed, or 99.99% confirmed, that he actually had children with his slave mistress, Sally Hemmings. Our film dealt with the controversy, it’s been brewing since 1802. It started a continual whispering behind Jefferson throughout his life and throughout American history. The DNA analysis confirmed it.

Our film made the larger point that some people said look he did, no he couldn’t of, but it was mitigated by the great historian, the late John L. Franklin. He said it didn’t matter, he owned her. I think that in our late 20th century, early 21st century tabloids mentality, did he or didn’t he is really just a sexual fascination. That in fact the more important thing was that he owned her. Somebody could have said, “Where’s Sally?” He could have said, “I killed her, she displeased me,” and there was not a law in America that would have protected her. That power relationship is in fact much more important than the sexual one.

They’re very complicating things. I’ll make it more difficult for you right now, which is, Jefferson’s wife had died, Sally’s was the product of a house slave that he had inherited from his father in law. She, Sally, was also the product of not only a house slave, but his father in law. This is a young girl that was the half sister of his wife, who looked close to what his wife might have looked, only a dark skinned or a mulatto version of that. He had been lonely for a long time — I’m not excusing it. He owned her, she was a teenager when their relationship began, but that complicates the story. That’s what we did in our film is take the simplistic judgments that we like to make of people, like Oh, he’s all bad, oh, she’s all good and say, well actually a little bit, it’s not as simple as that.

Yeah — a lot of grey. So, the Roosevelts — no other family has touched so many American lives with so much exposure. Was there anything you came across prior to the film that was particularly unexpected?

I think everything was unexpected. I think it had to do with the struggles of each of them, how each of them were wounded people. Each of them overcame their adversity, either in childhood or later in life to serve other people. I think when you get into that dimension, you know the outer events that we thought felt familiar, take on a different task.

When you’re thinking about trying to lift the whole country up with the New Deal and they’re realizing that Franklin Roosevelt can’t lift himself up, you begin to understand the dimensions and the dynamics of his polio. You have an even greater appreciation. So, to me it’s not so much the gotcha.

We’ve got lots of new scholarship and then we interviewed a woman who was the wife of the person Eleanor said she loved the most, David Gurewitsch, at the end of her life. They all lived together in a tree of one. She never appeared before in films, so made great use of the scholarship that was made available first to Geoffrey Ward, my writer, about his distant cousin, Davey Stekley, who was as close to Franklin as anybody’s every been. Not sexual, but the deepest friendship that he had. He confided stuff that he didn’t even confide to Eleanor. You’re learning aspects of Franklin’s life that even Eleanor would say, oh no he never expressed disappointment. Well, you’ve got lots and lots of letters in which he did to Davey. That opens up and gives dimensions to a notoriously opaque personal life Franklin Roosevelt. 


one’s not half two. It’s two are halves of one:

one’s not half two. It’s two are halves of one:
which halves reintegrating,shall occur
no death and any quantity;but than
all numerable mosts the actual more

minds ignorant of stern miraculous
this every truth-beware of heartless them
(given the scalpel,they dissect a kiss;
or,sold the reason,they undream a dream)

one is the song which fiends and angels sing:
all murdering lies by mortals told make two.
Let liars wilt,repaying life they’re loaned;
we(by a gift called dying born)must grow

deep in dark least ourselves remembering
love only rides his year.
                                           All lose,whole find

e.e. cummings


Danger is a biker’s middle name. Next Sunday, bearded champions of the darkworld, daddies in leather and wheeliemongers everywhere will pull on a pair of oilslick boots, run a switchblade comb through their cowlicks and clink a bottle of Bud to laying rubber on asphalt. It’s like looking your future ghost in the face and telling them to suck an egg. 

Danger is a biker’s middle name. Next Sunday, bearded champions of the darkworld, daddies in leather and wheeliemongers everywhere will pull on a pair of oilslick boots, run a switchblade comb through their cowlicks and clink a bottle of Bud to laying rubber on asphalt. It’s like looking your future ghost in the face and telling them to suck an egg. 


Senegal’s pink Lake Retba: a sight for sore eyes. 

Senegal’s pink Lake Retba: a sight for sore eyes. 


Casco Viejo, Panama 
Alajandra Matiz, daughter of legendary Columbian photographer Leo Matiz, was recently in the process of digitizing her father’s immense photo archive when she found a sealed, yellowing envelope full of never-before-seen negatives, labeled “Mexico and Friends.”
One of the friends turned out to be Frida Kahlo.    

Casco Viejo, Panama 

Alajandra Matiz, daughter of legendary Columbian photographer Leo Matiz, was recently in the process of digitizing her father’s immense photo archive when she found a sealed, yellowing envelope full of never-before-seen negatives, labeled “Mexico and Friends.”

One of the friends turned out to be Frida Kahlo.    


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