On December 26, 1927, in Hollywood’s Golden Age, Downtown Los Angeles welcomes the first United Artists Theatre.
Built upon Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks’s will to free artists from the major movie corporations, the building brought a new aesthetic to the Broadway Theatre District — the ornaments inspired by the Spanish Gothic era marked a break in the Art Deco architecture in vogue at the time.
We couldn’t be happier to be part of the building’s history and we look forward to celebrating its 85th anniversary by reopening its doors to our friends, old and new.
Read the full article published in The Motion Picture News from January-March 1928.
         

On December 26, 1927, in Hollywood’s Golden Age, Downtown Los Angeles welcomes the first United Artists Theatre.

Built upon Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks’s will to free artists from the major movie corporations, the building brought a new aesthetic to the Broadway Theatre District  the ornaments inspired by the Spanish Gothic era marked a break in the Art Deco architecture in vogue at the time.

We couldn’t be happier to be part of the building’s history and we look forward to celebrating its 85th anniversary by reopening its doors to our friends, old and new.

Read the full article published in The Motion Picture News from January-March 1928.

         


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