Pasadena, CA

John Whitney — Matrix III, 1972.

When American John Whitney founded Motion Graphics Incorporated in 1960, he’d already spent two decades working as a mechanical animator and inventor — a career that won him a Guggenheim Fellowship, and saw him working on such seminal visual effects as Saul Bass’ glorious title sequence for Hitchcock’s Vertigo. Using a converted WWII antiaircraft gun director, Whitney built his own 12-foot analogue computer in the 1950s, becoming in the process one of the primitive forebears of computer animation.

Whitney graduated to digital processes by the ’70s, when he created this gorgeously hypnotic film in collaboration with Terry Riley.


A 1970s Cold War era Las Vegas bomb-shelter-cum-home built 26 feet underground with green carpeted grass, a hot tub, BBQ disguised as a giant boulder, trees that grow right into the low ceilinged sky and a 360 degree mural mimicking actual nature. Live the panic attack for yourself.

A 1970s Cold War era Las Vegas bomb-shelter-cum-home built 26 feet underground with green carpeted grass, a hot tub, BBQ disguised as a giant boulder, trees that grow right into the low ceilinged sky and a 360 degree mural mimicking actual nature. Live the panic attack for yourself.


You can’t overestimate how exciting it was to be openly gay in San Francisco in the 1970s. I mean, Stonewall had happened in 1969, gay civil rights legislation was passing in different states, and, you know, for the first time you could love openly and not be considered sick, not be arrested. It was a very exciting, heady time…
Alysia Abbott writes about growing up with her gay dad in SF in the 70s in her new book Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father. As a millenium of civil rights struggles whirs into action before our very eyes — nascent advances are made, fundamental victories are threatened — it’s good to take a close look at those who brought us this far by demanding the right to be themselves.

You can’t overestimate how exciting it was to be openly gay in San Francisco in the 1970s. I mean, Stonewall had happened in 1969, gay civil rights legislation was passing in different states, and, you know, for the first time you could love openly and not be considered sick, not be arrested. It was a very exciting, heady time…

Alysia Abbott writes about growing up with her gay dad in SF in the 70s in her new book Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father. As a millenium of civil rights struggles whirs into action before our very eyes — nascent advances are made, fundamental victories are threatened — it’s good to take a close look at those who brought us this far by demanding the right to be themselves.

Fairyland Memoir

Fairyland Memoir


The team at LODOWN Magazine in Berlin are resurrecting an old prototype for an electric car from the 70s, the Electro Lotus E-Spirit. Their project is remarkable and inspiring. Check it out and support their Kickstarter.
LODOWN also just announced a new app — you can download it for free.

The team at LODOWN Magazine in Berlin are resurrecting an old prototype for an electric car from the 70s, the Electro Lotus E-Spirit. Their project is remarkable and inspiring. Check it out and support their Kickstarter.

LODOWN also just announced a new app — you can download it for free.


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