Things that are good: handmade things, sunshine in the hair and breeze on the back, helping out strangers, discovering shaking-and-moving things. Things that are better? Well, Better, over here, has been sharing writing and art that’s like that for a bit, and issue Five — from what we can tell — it’s a theme issue: everything is hi-five worthy. 

Collage by Rachel Day

Things that are good: handmade things, sunshine in the hair and breeze on the back, helping out strangers, discovering shaking-and-moving things. Things that are better? Well, Better, over here, has been sharing writing and art that’s like that for a bit, and issue Five — from what we can tell — it’s a theme issue: everything is hi-five worthy. 

Collage by Rachel Day


Oakland, CA 
It’s spring but we still have a little darkness to take care of, and Marci Washington's work will help us take care of it. 

Oakland, CA 

It’s spring but we still have a little darkness to take care of, and Marci Washington's work will help us take care of it. 


Palm Springs, CA
This is the finished Aaron de la Cruz mural he’s been creating at the Commune wall. It’s part of our Desert Gold kickoff. Time to hit the waves, sport some shortpants, and dance it out. 
In his interview he was kind enough to let out a signal flare that’s illuminating Desert Gold this year: we’re focusing extra attention on Latino artists, musicians and cultures.
The world is bursting with wonder, and sometimes it’s nice to have a lens to look through. So for now we’ll echo H. Valentine Miller: “One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things.”


photo by Aaron de la Cruz

photo by Aaron de la Cruz

Palm Springs, CA

This is the finished Aaron de la Cruz mural he’s been creating at the Commune wall. It’s part of our Desert Gold kickoff. Time to hit the waves, sport some shortpants, and dance it out. 

In his interview he was kind enough to let out a signal flare that’s illuminating Desert Gold this year: we’re focusing extra attention on Latino artists, musicians and cultures.

The world is bursting with wonder, and sometimes it’s nice to have a lens to look through. So for now we’ll echo H. Valentine Miller: “One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things.”

photo by Aaron de la Cruz

photo by Aaron de la Cruz


Russia

Untitled work by the youthful abstract painter Sasha Pichushkin.


Sleep tight.
Unparalleled object periodical THE THING Quarterly recently released their twenty-second edition, and it’s a doozy: a new work by American treasure John Baldessari. Like all of THE THING's things, it's meant to be used — two standard sized pillowcases silkscreened with a film still from Baldessari’s collection, a mise en abyme of a tranquil, anonymous woman clutching a pillow.
It’s beautiful, and we’ve got some in our shop.

Sleep tight.

Unparalleled object periodical THE THING Quarterly recently released their twenty-second edition, and it’s a doozy: a new work by American treasure John Baldessari. Like all of THE THING's things, it's meant to be used — two standard sized pillowcases silkscreened with a film still from Baldessari’s collection, a mise en abyme of a tranquil, anonymous woman clutching a pillow.

It’s beautiful, and we’ve got some in our shop.


London, United Kingdom

Now warming our lobby wall in Ace Hotel London Shoreditch, the meticulous artist craftsmen at Dovecot Studios have custom-woven us a stately tapestry — its eight distinct panels fashioned from an array of materials, including wool, cotton, linen, camel, and mohair.

Founded in Edinburgh in 1912, Dovecot built its reputation as a leading contemporary fine art tapestry studio — collaborating over the years on works with Cecil Beaton, Peter Blake, Graham Sutherland, Peter Saville, David Hockney, and Frank Stella.

True to Dovecot’s century-old philosophy, the large-scale commission began as a hands-on dialog between Ace and Master Weaver Naomi Robertson — a series of conversations that lead us to a unique gestation process. Initially taking cues from the principles of Bauhaus and the textile work of Anni Albers, we set out to honor the art and aesthetics inherent in the weaving process — incorporating a number of specialized, experimental and traditional weaving techniques to celebrate these inner-workings as the objet d’art in and of itself.

The project also served as a christening of sorts for Dovecot’s new loom, with both it and their tried-and-true apparatus working in tandem with each other to develop our pieces. Along the way, action weaver Travis Meinolf added his own bits alongside: fabric off-cuts, hotel documents and even locks of hair. 

Unusually, the suite was installed to reveal what is normally hidden — the reverse of the weavings — giving a unique insight into what lies behind the process. 

Details from a photograph by Andrew Meredith.


London, UK
Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London. Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.

London, UK

Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London.

Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.


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Downtown Los Angeles

Simon and Lukas. The Haas Brothers. These true LA darlings and dear, new friends evidently didn’t get enough of us while outfitting LA Chapter and our mezzanine bar with smart pencil drawings of deeply-plumbed references to LA’s social history. Here’s some evidence of their enduring and inspirational presence. If you see them, say hello.


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New York City

During a brief break between the snow and cold of this brutal NY winter, Brooklyn based painter Rostarr braved a scant, sketchy scissor lift to adorn the recently installed scaffolding around Ace Hotel New York. 

My name is Romon Yang also know as Rostarr, I am a painter & calligrapher and I live and work in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn. I was born in South Korea and moved with my family to Washington D.C. in 1972, I arrived in New York City in 1989 to attend the School of Visual Arts and have called NY home ever since.

Standing outside the whole day watching you paint the mural was pretty great. People crowded around and asked a lot of questions about you, who you are, where you’re from, but the number one question was, “is it some ancient Arabic script?” Tell us about the forms, your inspirations, how this style came about.

My approach to calligraphy is abstract & gestural, similar to asemic writing, and often times iconographic and pictogram like. As a young boy up until art school where I studied Typography and Iconography design, I’ve always appreciated the beauty and forms of calligraphy from China, Korea, Tibet, Thailand and Arabic calligraphic masters, and similarly my appreciation of hand styles by graffiti writers such as Phase II, Rammellzee, Futura, Keith Haring, etc., it was a natural transition for me to go from abstract painting to abstract calligraphy and vice versa. I will forever be a student of the brush & pen.    

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Everyone was amazed at how quickly you worked, you did half of the scaffolding in one day. You don’t appear to make mistakes either, it’s crazy. You’re clearly a pro at this, how long have you been doing this kind of work, these kinds of murals? 

Yeah, it’s a bit crazy to think that I painted a 4 foot high x 350 foot wide mural in 2 days (to be exact 10 hours, but who’s counting). I’ve been very fortunate to have been invited to make murals and large installations of various types, indoors/outdoors since 1998, around the time I joined the NY art collective Barnstormers. Making public art is giving love, plain and simple.

What inspires you, excites you, puts you your totally chill and creative zone?

I find the most pleasure in the moment of painting where I get in the zone and start laying my lines and shapes down, almost like building a visual sculpture. I get inspired by visualizing a location or wall and its surroundings and try to solve the problem with what style will make the right impact. 

With this painting commission for Ace Hotel, speed was an important factor as I wanted this mural to convey the energy and flow of commuters passing by 29th street & Broadway, similar to the way a computer motherboard looks with routes, destinations and intersections.

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Seems like one of the benefits to being a successful artist such as yourself, is that you get to do some traveling. Where’s you’re favorite place you’ve travelled to and what made it special?

I feel so lucky to have travelled a lot for my art, some of my favorite places have been: Tokyo, Paris, London, Venice, L.A., Mexico, Puerto Rico and especially Seoul Korea. Being that I left Korea when I was just 1 years old, Seoul holds a special place in my heart and is a place that I’m so curious about getting to know better, in a short amount of time I’ve met so many talented individuals and good friends out there, Seoul is definitely the place to watch out for!

As with any scaffolding in NYC, Rostarr’s work could be up for 3 months or 2 years. We recommend checking it out soon if you don’t want to miss it: 29th & B’way.

Photos by Lauren Coleman. 


London, UK
Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.

London, UK

Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.


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