London, UK
Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.

London, UK

Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.


London, UK
Beloved UK blog What We Wore is currently preparing an exhibition and book, to be published by Prestel in Autumn 2014. 
We met with co-founder and editor Nina Manandhar to chat about her hunt for the most captivating images and memories about style, and the social and communitarian aspect of one’s personal aesthetic.
The What We Wore Live Archive is in residence at our Gallery bar until tomorrow evening, where everyone’s invited to share their own images and stories about the perception of fashion past.  
How and why did you start the blog? 
'What We Wore' began as format on ISYS, the arts and culture based project and website, which is an exploration of British youth culture. Looking at image sharing websites like flickr a few years back, I noticed that there was a wealth of images that were for the first time being digitized and shared, and there was so much subtlety and nuance in them and the stories attached. The idea is for the images to allow people to tell their stories, to build a community around the stories.
Has your perception of fashion and style evolved?
Although the book is about style and fashion, the project aims to take you on an insiders tour of British youth culture and explore the notion of identity. Style is a key part of the way people belong, form groups, band and disband in youth movements and moments. 
Are you able to define the essence of British style by documenting its evolution between the 50s and today? If so, what is that essence? 
The essence of youth style is the way people reach out to each other to form connections. Style is the answer to an enduring need to affirm oneself. It is not just a British thing — it is the same for youth the world over, because this period of your life is particularly about defining yourself through what you wear on your body. 
Things are more hybrid and fluid now with style, but people have always flowed through scenes and movements. There is still reinvention, new identities emerging in youth culture, not everything is as off the peg as the cynics would suggest.

London, UK

Beloved UK blog What We Wore is currently preparing an exhibition and book, to be published by Prestel in Autumn 2014.

We met with co-founder and editor Nina Manandhar to chat about her hunt for the most captivating images and memories about style, and the social and communitarian aspect of one’s personal aesthetic.

The What We Wore Live Archive is in residence at our Gallery bar until tomorrow evening, where everyone’s invited to share their own images and stories about the perception of fashion past.  

How and why did you start the blog? 

'What We Wore' began as format on ISYS, the arts and culture based project and website, which is an exploration of British youth culture. Looking at image sharing websites like flickr a few years back, I noticed that there was a wealth of images that were for the first time being digitized and shared, and there was so much subtlety and nuance in them and the stories attached. The idea is for the images to allow people to tell their stories, to build a community around the stories.

Has your perception of fashion and style evolved?

Although the book is about style and fashion, the project aims to take you on an insiders tour of British youth culture and explore the notion of identity. Style is a key part of the way people belong, form groups, band and disband in youth movements and moments. 

Are you able to define the essence of British style by documenting its evolution between the 50s and today? If so, what is that essence? 

The essence of youth style is the way people reach out to each other to form connections. Style is the answer to an enduring need to affirm oneself. It is not just a British thing — it is the same for youth the world over, because this period of your life is particularly about defining yourself through what you wear on your body. 

Things are more hybrid and fluid now with style, but people have always flowed through scenes and movements. There is still reinvention, new identities emerging in youth culture, not everything is as off the peg as the cynics would suggest.


London, UK
A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.
How do you see yourself?
I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)
How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.
What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…
What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.
A secret power you would like to have?
              
To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…
All photos by Cheryl Dunn.

London, UK

A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.

How do you see yourself?

I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)

How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.

What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…

What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.

A secret power you would like to have?

              

To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…

All photos by Cheryl Dunn.


Ace London mural detail.
Collage for Room 135 by Steven Quinn

Ace London mural detail.

Collage for Room 135 by Steven Quinn


We’ve joined forces with our new neighbor Herald St Gallery, just down the road a piece from Ace Hotel London, to celebrate Frieze Art Fair with a month-long satellite exhibit. On display through November 17, Herald St is gracing our gallery walls with two works from Britain’s own Scott King, veteran of two of our cultural go-to’s, i-D Magazine and Sleazenation. 

We’ve joined forces with our new neighbor Herald St Gallery, just down the road a piece from Ace Hotel London, to celebrate Frieze Art Fair with a month-long satellite exhibit. On display through November 17, Herald St is gracing our gallery walls with two works from Britain’s own Scott King, veteran of two of our cultural go-to’s, i-D Magazine and Sleazenation


tokyobike have created custom bicycles for Ace Hotel London at their workshop and studio in Shoreditch. Now the bikes live with our loving if sometimes overbearing family on Shoreditch High Street, and they’ll take you wherever you want to go while you’re staying with us. You could get really meta and roll them over to tokyobike’s shop on Tabernacle Street and buy some tops and coffee. Meta tops, meta coffee. Let’s ride.

tokyobike have created custom bicycles for Ace Hotel London at their workshop and studio in Shoreditch. Now the bikes live with our loving if sometimes overbearing family on Shoreditch High Street, and they’ll take you wherever you want to go while you’re staying with us. You could get really meta and roll them over to tokyobike’s shop on Tabernacle Street and buy some tops and coffee. Meta tops, meta coffee. Let’s ride.


Something new from Hattie Fox for That Flower Shop, Ace Hotel London Shoreditch.

Something new from Hattie Fox for That Flower Shop, Ace Hotel London Shoreditch.


Ace Londoner Tomas Amerikonas won his match Friday night 20 to 2. Hats off to you, champ (but never gloves off). We’re proud to know you.


Change is everything. London accessories designer Ally Capellino agrees with us her in her gentle, idiosyncratic, useful, graceful, self-made, sturdy way. Not only has she created a small leather tray for the datums in Ace London guest rooms — useful for pens, leaves, pills, non-GMO seeds and, yes, change — but she also brings her signature design aesthetic to an iconic piece of furniture, the tubular stacking chair. Initially conceived by the Bauhaus group, they were the inspiration for many manufacturers in the interwar period in Britain. The PEL (Practical Equipment Limited) name quickly became synonymous with the product, and exploited the interest in modern shapes and design durability. These chairs have been the mainstay of schools, church halls and factories ever since.

Originally manufactured by Cox of Solihull, this set has been stripped back to their raw steel frames and taken in a new and inventive direction. Making inquiries into the way we position ourselves when seated, Ally and her team, which includes her son and daughter, made eight variations on the theme with seats that have been hand stitched and polished Italian bridle leather in her London studio before being branded with their name — ‘Left Leaning’ and ‘Cantilever’ for example.

Ally’s long-time collaborator Donald Christie created a short film examining the human use of accidental props in the style of 1957 Oscar-winning short A Chairy Tale. Meanwhile IRL, PEL chair enthusiast Rupert Blanchard has created installations of the chairs at Ally’s Shoreditch shop and at the junction of Portobello and Golborne Roads, up through the end of the London Design Festival this weekend.


About eighty kilometers from Ace Hotel London Shoreditch, at Tiptree, Wilkin and Sons grows strawberries, medlars, quinces, rhubarb, loganberries, damsons and mulberries on their farm in the Essex countryside. It’s a family tradition that stretches back over 300 years. And their coveted conserves are still made simply, from fruit harvested and boiled within hours at Tiptree, without preservatives or added colors. This year, an unusually bountiful autumn means their classic Little Scarlet jam — made from a tiny, outlandishly savory variety of strawberry brought from North America by C.J. Wilkin in the early 1900s and only grown today at Tiptree — will abound. In this season of plenty, so will the acorns in the New Forest, just as commoner pigs begin to remember pannage, and the chestnuts ready-for-roasting in Greenwich Park. After a summer that started slow then settled in, Britain’s bumper harvest bodes well for teatimes, farmers and people who wait for what the soil will bring.

About eighty kilometers from Ace Hotel London Shoreditch, at Tiptree, Wilkin and Sons grows strawberries, medlars, quinces, rhubarb, loganberries, damsons and mulberries on their farm in the Essex countryside. It’s a family tradition that stretches back over 300 years. And their coveted conserves are still made simply, from fruit harvested and boiled within hours at Tiptree, without preservatives or added colors. This year, an unusually bountiful autumn means their classic Little Scarlet jam — made from a tiny, outlandishly savory variety of strawberry brought from North America by C.J. Wilkin in the early 1900s and only grown today at Tiptree — will abound. In this season of plenty, so will the acorns in the New Forest, just as commoner pigs begin to remember pannage, and the chestnuts ready-for-roasting in Greenwich Park. After a summer that started slow then settled in, Britain’s bumper harvest bodes well for teatimes, farmers and people who wait for what the soil will bring.


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