Downtown Los Angeles

Right now LA’s humming with that kind of don’t-dream-it-be-it confidence that makes you feel like anything’s possible. Our neighbors downtown keep coming up with new and better ways to do community. We’re glad we’re here for it.
The Atlantic, along with The Aspen Institute and Bloomberg Philanthropies, sees what we see, so we’re hosting this year’s CityLab conference in our Theatre.  
This weekend was the debut of Pop-Up Broadway, too, and some of our friends will be outside The Theatre tonight, in case you need an ice pop.  




 

Downtown Los Angeles

Right now LA’s humming with that kind of don’t-dream-it-be-it confidence that makes you feel like anything’s possible. Our neighbors downtown keep coming up with new and better ways to do community. We’re glad we’re here for it.

The Atlantic, along with The Aspen Institute and Bloomberg Philanthropies, sees what we see, so we’re hosting this year’s CityLab conference in our Theatre.  

This weekend was the debut of Pop-Up Broadway, too, and some of our friends will be outside The Theatre tonight, in case you need an ice pop.  

 


The house known as The Castle doesn’t haunt Downtown LA in corporeal form these days, but if you look up, and you’re prone to daydream, maybe you’ll see a faint outline through the summer haze. The sprawling Victorian mansion — a backdrop for noir films like Kiss Me Deadly and Criss Cross — was one of the last holdouts of the fated Bunker Hill neighborhood that disappeared in the 60s, when the Hill was flattened so the saw teeth of progress could jut skyward from the urban plain. But long before the Community Redevelopment Agency doomed Bunker Hill the Castle was believed to be haunted, possibly by one of several residents that met untimely ends. Scheduled at one point for demolition, the Castle was saved by public outcry, and moved whole, only to be destroyed by arson. Our theory is that the ghosts of Bunker Hill still wander the corridors of Downtown LA. 

The house known as The Castle doesn’t haunt Downtown LA in corporeal form these days, but if you look up, and you’re prone to daydream, maybe you’ll see a faint outline through the summer haze. The sprawling Victorian mansion — a backdrop for noir films like Kiss Me Deadly and Criss Cross — was one of the last holdouts of the fated Bunker Hill neighborhood that disappeared in the 60s, when the Hill was flattened so the saw teeth of progress could jut skyward from the urban plain. But long before the Community Redevelopment Agency doomed Bunker Hill the Castle was believed to be haunted, possibly by one of several residents that met untimely ends. Scheduled at one point for demolition, the Castle was saved by public outcry, and moved whole, only to be destroyed by arson. Our theory is that the ghosts of Bunker Hill still wander the corridors of Downtown LA. 


We lift our mugs to Johnie’s Coffee Shop on Wilshire and Fairfax in the heart of LA on being nominated as a local landmark by the Los Angeles Conservancy. With your sloping, candy-striped roof, rock columns and miles of neon, you’re already a landmark in our moonage daydreams. Hey, is that Andre the Giant?

We lift our mugs to Johnie’s Coffee Shop on Wilshire and Fairfax in the heart of LA on being nominated as a local landmark by the Los Angeles Conservancy. With your sloping, candy-striped roof, rock columns and miles of neon, you’re already a landmark in our moonage daydreams. Hey, is that Andre the Giant?


Shepard Fairey and some other people you may have heard of are looking for a logo for their campaign to re-awaken the latent beauty of the LA River. The Greenway 2020 project by the LA River Corp aims to create a continuous Greenway along the LA River by the year 2020, revitalizing an artery of the city as a linear hub for nature and recreation. As Shepard puts it, “I’ve always enjoyed the graffiti as a bit of flavor along the river, but few would call the LA River a scenic destination. That is about to change!” This is where you come in — they need a logo. But the deadline for submissions is today at 5pm Pacific. So drop everything, look at the specifications and signify. If your logo is chosen by Shepard and friends you score 2020 bones and get to be the proud creator of a symbol for change. 

Shepard Fairey and some other people you may have heard of are looking for a logo for their campaign to re-awaken the latent beauty of the LA River. The Greenway 2020 project by the LA River Corp aims to create a continuous Greenway along the LA River by the year 2020, revitalizing an artery of the city as a linear hub for nature and recreation. As Shepard puts it, “I’ve always enjoyed the graffiti as a bit of flavor along the river, but few would call the LA River a scenic destination. That is about to change!” This is where you come in — they need a logo. But the deadline for submissions is today at 5pm Pacific. So drop everything, look at the specifications and signify. If your logo is chosen by Shepard and friends you score 2020 bones and get to be the proud creator of a symbol for change. 


Carlton Davis signs copies of his book The Art Dockuments: Tales of the Art Dock: The Drive-by Gallery in the Art Walk Lounge during Thursday’s Downtown Los Angeles Art Walk. The book tells the history of the influential early 80s drive-by gallery Davis founded at a loading dock in the Citizens Warehouse aka the Pickle Factory in the Arts District. It’s an insightful, humorous memoir of the times, and of being an artist on the ever-elusive fringe.

Carlton Davis signs copies of his book The Art Dockuments: Tales of the Art Dock: The Drive-by Gallery in the Art Walk Lounge during Thursday’s Downtown Los Angeles Art Walk. The book tells the history of the influential early 80s drive-by gallery Davis founded at a loading dock in the Citizens Warehouse aka the Pickle Factory in the Arts District. It’s an insightful, humorous memoir of the times, and of being an artist on the ever-elusive fringe.


DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
Légumes printaniers spring green vegetables, red quinoa and garlic chips at Church & State in Downtown LA. Communion, in our book.

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES

Légumes printaniers spring green vegetables, red quinoa and garlic chips at Church & State in Downtown LA. Communion, in our book.


The third annual LA Street Food Fest hits the Arcadian lanes at the Rose Bowl this weekend. Come break bread with fellow real food enthusiasts as we celebrate the continued world resurgence of bringing good handmade stuff to the masses by cart, truck or wheelbarrow. A ticket gets you unlimited goodness, so once you’re in you can eat like the Fat Boys in ‘85. We’re particularly looking forward to musubi by Mama Musubi, ceviche by Coni’Seafood, Pig ear chicharrones by Lazy Ox Canteen, sliders by Vagabond Grillyard, handmade dumplings by Bling Bling Dumpling and dragon’s beard candy by Dragon’s Beard and Whisker. Proceeds from the fest are donated to St. Vincent Meals On Wheels and Woolly School Garden.

The third annual LA Street Food Fest hits the Arcadian lanes at the Rose Bowl this weekend. Come break bread with fellow real food enthusiasts as we celebrate the continued world resurgence of bringing good handmade stuff to the masses by cart, truck or wheelbarrow. A ticket gets you unlimited goodness, so once you’re in you can eat like the Fat Boys in ‘85. We’re particularly looking forward to musubi by Mama Musubi, ceviche by Coni’SeafoodPig ear chicharrones by Lazy Ox Canteen, sliders by Vagabond Grillyard, handmade dumplings by Bling Bling Dumpling and dragon’s beard candy by Dragon’s Beard and Whisker. Proceeds from the fest are donated to St. Vincent Meals On Wheels and Woolly School Garden.


ARTS DISTRICT, LOS ANGELES
This weekend Parachute Market brings together makers from around the Valley and beyondin LA’s Arts — a stone’s throw from the future Ace Hotel Downtown LA. The new quarterly presented by Storefront, is themed Psychedelic Summer, harkening to the hippie roots of West Coast craft.
Lindy and Grundy's Amelia Posada brings home the bacon from local family farms to discerning Angelenos with cofounder and partner Erika Nakamura. Amelia brings her journalist’s eye, activist’s passion, floral designer’s aesthetic and educator’s ethos to the butcher’s art. She’s also one of the curators at Parachute Market, so we asked her for a few words on craft, pigs and self-sufficiency.
Talk about the ever-increasing inclination toward keeping it close to home and doing it yourself.
Everywhere you look these days, we see actual craftsmen/women opening butcher shops, leather boutiques, urban farms, small batch ice cream… At my butcher shop, I get tons of people coming in who want to learn how to grind their own meat at home, make sausages for their families. I have friends putting bee hives and chicken coops in their back yards. We’ve become so disconnected with food and agriculture — and those of us who have grown up in urban areas have been conditioned to shop at massive chain stores — that it’s wonderful to see so many people who are tired of handing their hard-earned money to giant corporations instead seeking out specialists, farmers markets and artisans, and supporting their own local economies. I think we all crave that sense of community. It’s exciting and inspiring to be a part of this.
What are most excited about this weekend?
Eating too many “sausage snuggies” and Mexican street corn pies from my favorite baker, The Pig & Pastry Pie Company. And I’m totally looking forward to getting up at 4am to start roasting the pig, ha!
If you had to trade in the cleaver for some other tool what would you choose?
I’d pick up my floral shears and knife again. My first love has always been floral design. 

ARTS DISTRICT, LOS ANGELES

This weekend Parachute Market brings together makers from around the Valley and beyondin LA’s Arts — a stone’s throw from the future Ace Hotel Downtown LA. The new quarterly presented by Storefront, is themed Psychedelic Summer, harkening to the hippie roots of West Coast craft.

Lindy and Grundy's Amelia Posada brings home the bacon from local family farms to discerning Angelenos with cofounder and partner Erika NakamuraAmelia brings her journalist’s eye, activist’s passion, floral designer’s aesthetic and educator’s ethos to the butcher’s art. She’s also one of the curators at Parachute Market, so we asked her for a few words on craft, pigs and self-sufficiency.

Talk about the ever-increasing inclination toward keeping it close to home and doing it yourself.

Everywhere you look these days, we see actual craftsmen/women opening butcher shops, leather boutiques, urban farms, small batch ice cream… At my butcher shop, I get tons of people coming in who want to learn how to grind their own meat at home, make sausages for their families. I have friends putting bee hives and chicken coops in their back yards. We’ve become so disconnected with food and agriculture — and those of us who have grown up in urban areas have been conditioned to shop at massive chain stores — that it’s wonderful to see so many people who are tired of handing their hard-earned money to giant corporations instead seeking out specialists, farmers markets and artisans, and supporting their own local economies. I think we all crave that sense of community. It’s exciting and inspiring to be a part of this.

What are most excited about this weekend?

Eating too many “sausage snuggies” and Mexican street corn pies from my favorite baker, The Pig & Pastry Pie Company. And I’m totally looking forward to getting up at 4am to start roasting the pig, ha!

If you had to trade in the cleaver for some other tool what would you choose?

I’d pick up my floral shears and knife again. My first love has always been floral design. 


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