Shoreditch, London
From the vast, incomprehensible cartography of the globe to the quiet cognitive maps of the everyday, we map for comfort — to afford ourselves the illusion of place. They’re the red dots we use to assure ourselves that “You Are Here” — and that everything else is relative and predictable. 
With Where You Are (a must-see website), the pictorially preoccupied storytellers at London publishing house Visual Editions take on the idea of mapping from the perspective of 16 different writers, artists and thinkers — in fiction and non-fiction writing plus a variety of visuals — to create "a book of maps that will leave you feeling completely lost." Featuring contributions from Chloe Aridjis, Alain de Botton, Joe Dunthorne, Leanne Shapton, Geoff Dyer, Olafur Eliasson, Sheila Heti + Ted Mineo, Tao Lin and a host of others, the book is a beautiful, mixed-up marvel of a thing.

The lobby gallery at Ace Hotel London Shoreditch opens up the atlas of Where Are You for the month of April, putting the collection’s rich visual components on display twenty-four hours a day. The opening reception is coming up on Wednesday April 2 at 6pm, complete with cocktails, conversation and a few readings.

Shoreditch, London

From the vast, incomprehensible cartography of the globe to the quiet cognitive maps of the everyday, we map for comfort — to afford ourselves the illusion of place. They’re the red dots we use to assure ourselves that “You Are Here” — and that everything else is relative and predictable. 

With Where You Are (a must-see website), the pictorially preoccupied storytellers at London publishing house Visual Editions take on the idea of mapping from the perspective of 16 different writers, artists and thinkers — in fiction and non-fiction writing plus a variety of visuals — to create "a book of maps that will leave you feeling completely lost." Featuring contributions from Chloe Aridjis, Alain de Botton, Joe Dunthorne, Leanne Shapton, Geoff Dyer, Olafur Eliasson, Sheila Heti + Ted Mineo, Tao Lin and a host of others, the book is a beautiful, mixed-up marvel of a thing.

The lobby gallery at Ace Hotel London Shoreditch opens up the atlas of Where Are You for the month of April, putting the collection’s rich visual components on display twenty-four hours a day. The opening reception is coming up on Wednesday April 2 at 6pm, complete with cocktails, conversation and a few readings.


Shoreditch, London
Nights stay younger longer in Shoreditch lately. We got tired of stepping out for a spot of food just as restaurant staff were stripping back the cutlery, so Hoi Polloi's been celebrating us night creatures with raucous Midnight Suppers.
Thursday nights are set aside for our oft-unruly special guest Maitre D’s, with Fridays devoted to Hoi Polloi’s musical director — their radiant, Vangelian angel Xavior — who posts up at the piano each week with a new weapon in his arsenal of synthesizers. This round he’ll be exploring the outer cosmos with his Arturia Laboratory. If you can’t make it on Friday, don’t fret: Hoi Polloi will be happy to entertain you late, seven days a week.

Shoreditch, London

Nights stay younger longer in Shoreditch lately. We got tired of stepping out for a spot of food just as restaurant staff were stripping back the cutlery, so Hoi Polloi's been celebrating us night creatures with raucous Midnight Suppers.

Thursday nights are set aside for our oft-unruly special guest Maitre D’s, with Fridays devoted to Hoi Polloi’s musical director — their radiant, Vangelian angel Xavior — who posts up at the piano each week with a new weapon in his arsenal of synthesizers. This round he’ll be exploring the outer cosmos with his Arturia Laboratory. If you can’t make it on Friday, don’t fret: Hoi Polloi will be happy to entertain you late, seven days a week.


London, UK
Throughout the ’90s and early ’00s, American experimental music treasure William Basinski operated a now-mythical avant-garde incubator beside the East River in North Williamsburg — a studio and performance space that played early host to Diamanda Galás, Antony and countless others. Arcadia closed its doors for good in 2008, but London’s Art Assembly brought Basinski out to co-curate a series of Arcadia-inspired music and live art events in London — including a host of pretty spectacular shows at Ace London.
The mini-fest kicked off tonight and continues through March 20. We’ll be hosting several shows Downstairs — Basinski and James Elaine’s Melancholia film shorts, Julia Kent, Paul Prudence and more — plus Janek Schaefer's sound installation Lay-by-Lullaby will be posted up in the lobby throughout. More details are available at our calendar.

London, UK

Throughout the ’90s and early ’00s, American experimental music treasure William Basinski operated a now-mythical avant-garde incubator beside the East River in North Williamsburg — a studio and performance space that played early host to Diamanda Galás, Antony and countless others. Arcadia closed its doors for good in 2008, but London’s Art Assembly brought Basinski out to co-curate a series of Arcadia-inspired music and live art events in London — including a host of pretty spectacular shows at Ace London.

The mini-fest kicked off tonight and continues through March 20. We’ll be hosting several shows Downstairs — Basinski and James Elaine’s Melancholia film shorts, Julia KentPaul Prudence and more — plus Janek Schaefer's sound installation Lay-by-Lullaby will be posted up in the lobby throughout. More details are available at our calendar.


London, United Kingdom

Now warming our lobby wall in Ace Hotel London Shoreditch, the meticulous artist craftsmen at Dovecot Studios have custom-woven us a stately tapestry — its eight distinct panels fashioned from an array of materials, including wool, cotton, linen, camel, and mohair.

Founded in Edinburgh in 1912, Dovecot built its reputation as a leading contemporary fine art tapestry studio — collaborating over the years on works with Cecil Beaton, Peter Blake, Graham Sutherland, Peter Saville, David Hockney, and Frank Stella.

True to Dovecot’s century-old philosophy, the large-scale commission began as a hands-on dialog between Ace and Master Weaver Naomi Robertson — a series of conversations that lead us to a unique gestation process. Initially taking cues from the principles of Bauhaus and the textile work of Anni Albers, we set out to honor the art and aesthetics inherent in the weaving process — incorporating a number of specialized, experimental and traditional weaving techniques to celebrate these inner-workings as the objet d’art in and of itself.

The project also served as a christening of sorts for Dovecot’s new loom, with both it and their tried-and-true apparatus working in tandem with each other to develop our pieces. Along the way, action weaver Travis Meinolf added his own bits alongside: fabric off-cuts, hotel documents and even locks of hair. 

Unusually, the suite was installed to reveal what is normally hidden — the reverse of the weavings — giving a unique insight into what lies behind the process. 

Details from a photograph by Andrew Meredith.


London, UKThat Flower Shop
First sign of spring.

London, UK
That Flower Shop

First sign of spring.


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The simple lace curtain.

The UK’s signature window trimming — in its very existence, highlighting everything we love about this corner of the world — pairs form and function perfectly, obstructing the voyeuristic eyeballs of neighbors while letting in those all-too-precious rays of English sunlight. And because we couldn’t go one more day without our very own signature window trimming, friends at MYB Textiles in Scotland were kind enough to craft a collection of special lace curtains for Bulldog Edition, Ace London’s window-front lobby café.

The only manufacturer in the world still using the Nottingham Lace Looms, MYB has paired their beautifully antiquated machines with CAD software for a fresh design influence. Bulldog Edition’s exclusive lace design was inspired by Grid Index, the comprehensive grid research project of contemporary artist Carsten Nicolai.

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Ace London mural detail.
Collage for Room 135 by Steven Quinn

Ace London mural detail.

Collage for Room 135 by Steven Quinn


London’s soft, loveworn damask underbelly is one of the things we love dearly about this place. One of the most forward-thinking spots in the multiverse, it is deeply rooted in its history via some very beautiful, threadbare stretches of brocade, porcelain and thrice-used linen teabags. This weekend will find us at Judy’s Vintage Furniture Flea, which celebrates midcentury british furniture and design, in Spitalfields just a few blocks from our Shoreditch outpost.

If you see us carting off with a donkeyload of fragile wicker picnic baskets, throne chairs and handsomely-aged sterling napkin rings, you’ll see that our reputation for minimalism is only part of the story.

London’s soft, loveworn damask underbelly is one of the things we love dearly about this place. One of the most forward-thinking spots in the multiverse, it is deeply rooted in its history via some very beautiful, threadbare stretches of brocade, porcelain and thrice-used linen teabags. This weekend will find us at Judy’s Vintage Furniture Flea, which celebrates midcentury british furniture and design, in Spitalfields just a few blocks from our Shoreditch outpost.

If you see us carting off with a donkeyload of fragile wicker picnic baskets, throne chairs and handsomely-aged sterling napkin rings, you’ll see that our reputation for minimalism is only part of the story.


We’ve joined forces with our new neighbor Herald St Gallery, just down the road a piece from Ace Hotel London, to celebrate Frieze Art Fair with a month-long satellite exhibit. On display through November 17, Herald St is gracing our gallery walls with two works from Britain’s own Scott King, veteran of two of our cultural go-to’s, i-D Magazine and Sleazenation. 

We’ve joined forces with our new neighbor Herald St Gallery, just down the road a piece from Ace Hotel London, to celebrate Frieze Art Fair with a month-long satellite exhibit. On display through November 17, Herald St is gracing our gallery walls with two works from Britain’s own Scott King, veteran of two of our cultural go-to’s, i-D Magazine and Sleazenation


London’s Rio Cinema is an institution of boozy, Art Deco and inexpensive cinema-going. But it’s on its last leg, and needs your help. Viva la Sunday matinee.

London’s Rio Cinema is an institution of boozy, Art Deco and inexpensive cinema-going. But it’s on its last leg, and needs your help. Viva la Sunday matinee.


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