Kayla Mattes teaches an Introduction to Frame Loom Weaving workshop this weekend for Summer School 2014 at Ace Hotel & Swim Club in Palm Springs. See other workshops on our calendar, and get ye poolside, crafts in hand.

Kayla Mattes teaches an Introduction to Frame Loom Weaving workshop this weekend for Summer School 2014 at Ace Hotel & Swim Club in Palm Springs. See other workshops on our calendar, and get ye poolside, crafts in hand.


Brice Marden from Karma BooksSolomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 19757.5 x 8.5 inches (19.2 x 21.5 cm)

Brice Marden from Karma Books
Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 1975
7.5 x 8.5 inches (19.2 x 21.5 cm)

Cite Arrow via karmakarmanyc

LOS ANGELES
LA-based photographer Peter Bohler captured stills from one of our favorite earthbound fantasias, Arcosanti — the living dream of late Italian-American architect Paolo Soleri who passed this spring at age 93. Some of Peter’s thoughts on Paolo’s invention:


Arcosanti was conceived by Paolo Soleri as a new form of city—one that would exist in harmony with nature and promote community by being free of cars. He called his philosophy arcology, a merging of architecture and ecology. He found a home for his city in Arizona on the edge of a canyon an hour north of Phoenix.
Construction began in 1970, with a crew of volunteers casting Soleri’s sweeping concrete forms in the desert sand. Thirteen buildings were built this way through the 70’s and 80’s, but construction stalled because of a lack of funding. Originally intended to hold 5,000 people, today Arcosanti is home to a transient population of just 50 to 100 people.
Arcosanti supports itself through the creation of bronze and ceramic bells based on Soleri’s design. The residents first complete a five-week workshop on Soleri’s ideas, and then are employed either in the workshops or in the daily operation of the city. They comprise a community of idealists as Arcosanti slips from dream to relic.

LOS ANGELES

LA-based photographer Peter Bohler captured stills from one of our favorite earthbound fantasias, Arcosanti — the living dream of late Italian-American architect Paolo Soleri who passed this spring at age 93. Some of Peter’s thoughts on Paolo’s invention:

Arcosanti was conceived by Paolo Soleri as a new form of city—one that would exist in harmony with nature and promote community by being free of cars. He called his philosophy arcology, a merging of architecture and ecology. He found a home for his city in Arizona on the edge of a canyon an hour north of Phoenix.

Construction began in 1970, with a crew of volunteers casting Soleri’s sweeping concrete forms in the desert sand. Thirteen buildings were built this way through the 70’s and 80’s, but construction stalled because of a lack of funding. Originally intended to hold 5,000 people, today Arcosanti is home to a transient population of just 50 to 100 people.

Arcosanti supports itself through the creation of bronze and ceramic bells based on Soleri’s design. The residents first complete a five-week workshop on Soleri’s ideas, and then are employed either in the workshops or in the daily operation of the city. They comprise a community of idealists as Arcosanti slips from dream to relic.

Arcosanti

Arcosanti

Arcosanti


Shepard Fairey and some other people you may have heard of are looking for a logo for their campaign to re-awaken the latent beauty of the LA River. The Greenway 2020 project by the LA River Corp aims to create a continuous Greenway along the LA River by the year 2020, revitalizing an artery of the city as a linear hub for nature and recreation. As Shepard puts it, “I’ve always enjoyed the graffiti as a bit of flavor along the river, but few would call the LA River a scenic destination. That is about to change!” This is where you come in — they need a logo. But the deadline for submissions is today at 5pm Pacific. So drop everything, look at the specifications and signify. If your logo is chosen by Shepard and friends you score 2020 bones and get to be the proud creator of a symbol for change. 

Shepard Fairey and some other people you may have heard of are looking for a logo for their campaign to re-awaken the latent beauty of the LA River. The Greenway 2020 project by the LA River Corp aims to create a continuous Greenway along the LA River by the year 2020, revitalizing an artery of the city as a linear hub for nature and recreation. As Shepard puts it, “I’ve always enjoyed the graffiti as a bit of flavor along the river, but few would call the LA River a scenic destination. That is about to change!” This is where you come in — they need a logo. But the deadline for submissions is today at 5pm Pacific. So drop everything, look at the specifications and signify. If your logo is chosen by Shepard and friends you score 2020 bones and get to be the proud creator of a symbol for change. 


A throwback to Ace Hotel Portland's early days — a spread in Coastal Traveler with room muralists Amy Ruppel in room 304, Ryan Jacob Smith in 404 and Evan B. Harris in 225. As it happens, Evan was the focus of our first ever Thinking Cap video — you can see it yonder.

A throwback to Ace Hotel Portland's early days — a spread in Coastal Traveler with room muralists Amy Ruppel in room 304, Ryan Jacob Smith in 404 and Evan B. Harris in 225. As it happens, Evan was the focus of our first ever Thinking Cap video — you can see it yonder.


A collage from Caris Reid.

A collage from Caris Reid.


Ace NYC artist and good pal Timothy Goodman created a project with his partner in crime and good friend Jessica Walsh to address their mutually gnarly dating issues. The project is complete, but you have to wait as long as they did to figure out how it ends up. See a new post daily at 40 Days of Dating.


Lightbox, episode deux of Love Kills Demons, a twelve-part film portrait of Chris Rubino by Jim Helton. Chris is an Ace NYC artist — he was there right at the start making huge canvases for some rooms that still count among our favorites. You can see more about him from the early days of our blog.


Carlton Davis signs copies of his book The Art Dockuments: Tales of the Art Dock: The Drive-by Gallery in the Art Walk Lounge during Thursday’s Downtown Los Angeles Art Walk. The book tells the history of the influential early 80s drive-by gallery Davis founded at a loading dock in the Citizens Warehouse aka the Pickle Factory in the Arts District. It’s an insightful, humorous memoir of the times, and of being an artist on the ever-elusive fringe.

Carlton Davis signs copies of his book The Art Dockuments: Tales of the Art Dock: The Drive-by Gallery in the Art Walk Lounge during Thursday’s Downtown Los Angeles Art Walk. The book tells the history of the influential early 80s drive-by gallery Davis founded at a loading dock in the Citizens Warehouse aka the Pickle Factory in the Arts District. It’s an insightful, humorous memoir of the times, and of being an artist on the ever-elusive fringe.


One of our favorite dudes in the world, Joe Garvey, painted a new mural in room 1216 at Ace Hotel New York, and then his friend Jonny Baskin took pictures.

One of our favorite dudes in the world, Joe Garvey, painted a new mural in room 1216 at Ace Hotel New York, and then his friend Jonny Baskin took pictures.


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