Portland, OR and New York City
Today we’re celebrating along with all the Portlanders who eat food. We’re celebrating with all the New Yorkers who eat food, too. The James Beard Foundation’s Awards were just announced, and two of our favorite chefs in the wide world got the nod in two of the very best places to eat in our fine United States. 
April Bloomfield, holder of Michelin stars at count them two fine eateries in The Big Apple — including The Breslin, in our very own Ace Apple Outpost — champion of pigs both spotted and un- and person who straight up makes things happen. If you’ve been put through your paces in the restaurant world, you know Chef Bloomfield is as hardcore as they come.
Naomi Pomeroy, the fabulous and talented, the brains and brawn behind Beast and a badass mother to boot, just took home the 2014 James Beard Best Chef Northwest award. In her acceptance speech in New York City she said, "I feel like I’m taking this home for everybody in the Northwest." Bring it on home, you two. We’ll be here, ready. We’re the ones making all the glass-clinking noises. 

Portland, OR and New York City

Today we’re celebrating along with all the Portlanders who eat food. We’re celebrating with all the New Yorkers who eat food, too. The James Beard Foundation’s Awards were just announced, and two of our favorite chefs in the wide world got the nod in two of the very best places to eat in our fine United States. 

April Bloomfield, holder of Michelin stars at count them two fine eateries in The Big Apple — including The Breslin, in our very own Ace Apple Outpost — champion of pigs both spotted and un- and person who straight up makes things happen. If you’ve been put through your paces in the restaurant world, you know Chef Bloomfield is as hardcore as they come.

Naomi Pomeroy, the fabulous and talented, the brains and brawn behind Beast and a badass mother to boot, just took home the 2014 James Beard Best Chef Northwest award. In her acceptance speech in New York City she said, "I feel like I’m taking this home for everybody in the Northwest." Bring it on home, you two. We’ll be here, ready. We’re the ones making all the glass-clinking noises. 


Post-Ace collage sent by a friend.

Post-Ace collage sent by a friend.



Rest assured. Why didn’t we think of that?

Rest assured. Why didn’t we think of that?


April Bloomfield hosts chef and preservation maestro Paul Virant with The Breslin this Sunday evening at Ace Hotel New York to celebrate Paul’s new cookbook The Preservation Kitchen with a 5-course dinner, dessert and cocktails in Liberty Hall. Paul and April met half a decade ago when they were both honored as Food & Wine Magazine’s Best New Chefs. They became fast friends, bonding over their love of Chez Panisse, charcuterie, pickling and rock. Back in July, Paul hosted April at Perennial Virant for the launch of her first cookbook A Girl and Her Pig. Now, she responds in kind.
The acclaimed chefs will each prepare a course, along with additional courses from chef Nick Anderer of Maialino and chef Josh Even of The John Dory with dessert prepared by The Breslin’s pastry chef Jane Tseng. Cocktail hour begins at 7pm, followed by dinner at 8. After the feast, you can stay for an afterparty featuring book signings with Paul and April on The Breslin’s mezzanine. Limited tickets are available here, and you can find out more about the event on April’s site.
To whet your appetite, we’ve included a good starter recipe for your preservation projects this fall: Preserved Lemons.
Yield: 2 pint jarsTime: 20 minutes
2 cups kosher salt, more if needed1 cup sugar1/4 cup Herbes de Provence8 organic lemons
Wash the lemons and slice their ends off. If they’re large, cut them into six wedges. If they’re small, cut them into four wedges. If they’re somewhere in between, wing it. In a large bowl add the salt, sugar and Herbes de Provence — this is your cure mixture. Add the lemon wedges and coat them well.
In a Mason jars or a ceramic vessel, add a bit of the cure mixture to the bottom, then add the lemon wedges, sprinkling the cure mixture in between each layer as you go. Squeeze one or two of the wedges over the top and fill the vessels to the brim with the remaining mixture. If you don’t have enough of the mixture left, just cover the top completely with a layer of salt.
Cover the vessels for four to five days, after which you’ll see that the mixture has created a brine. Make sure that the lemons are still submerged. You might need to add something to keep the lemons from rising to the surface, such as a small ceramic ramekin. (Or a ceramekin, as we like to call it.)
Place the vessels in a cool spot that stays below 65 degrees, and give the lemons a stir every once in a while. Let them cure for a least a month, but preferably for four months. Once they’ve cured, they can keep in the refrigerator up to one year as long as they stay submerged in the brine.

Images come from Susie Kauck, editor of Return to Sunday Supper and prop stylist for Paul’s book from Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, from whence this recipe came.

April Bloomfield hosts chef and preservation maestro Paul Virant with The Breslin this Sunday evening at Ace Hotel New York to celebrate Paul’s new cookbook The Preservation Kitchen with a 5-course dinner, dessert and cocktails in Liberty Hall. Paul and April met half a decade ago when they were both honored as Food & Wine Magazine’s Best New Chefs. They became fast friends, bonding over their love of Chez Panisse, charcuterie, pickling and rock. Back in July, Paul hosted April at Perennial Virant for the launch of her first cookbook A Girl and Her Pig. Now, she responds in kind.

The acclaimed chefs will each prepare a course, along with additional courses from chef Nick Anderer of Maialino and chef Josh Even of The John Dory with dessert prepared by The Breslin’s pastry chef Jane Tseng. Cocktail hour begins at 7pm, followed by dinner at 8. After the feast, you can stay for an afterparty featuring book signings with Paul and April on The Breslin’s mezzanine. Limited tickets are available here, and you can find out more about the event on April’s site.

To whet your appetite, we’ve included a good starter recipe for your preservation projects this fall: Preserved Lemons.

Yield: 2 pint jars
Time: 20 minutes

2 cups kosher salt, more if needed
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup Herbes de Provence
8 organic lemons

Wash the lemons and slice their ends off. If they’re large, cut them into six wedges. If they’re small, cut them into four wedges. If they’re somewhere in between, wing it. In a large bowl add the salt, sugar and Herbes de Provence — this is your cure mixture. Add the lemon wedges and coat them well.

In a Mason jars or a ceramic vessel, add a bit of the cure mixture to the bottom, then add the lemon wedges, sprinkling the cure mixture in between each layer as you go. Squeeze one or two of the wedges over the top and fill the vessels to the brim with the remaining mixture. If you don’t have enough of the mixture left, just cover the top completely with a layer of salt.

Cover the vessels for four to five days, after which you’ll see that the mixture has created a brine. Make sure that the lemons are still submerged. You might need to add something to keep the lemons from rising to the surface, such as a small ceramic ramekin. (Or a ceramekin, as we like to call it.)

Place the vessels in a cool spot that stays below 65 degrees, and give the lemons a stir every once in a while. Let them cure for a least a month, but preferably for four months. Once they’ve cured, they can keep in the refrigerator up to one year as long as they stay submerged in the brine.

Images come from Susie Kauck, editor of Return to Sunday Supper and prop stylist for Paul’s book from Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, from whence this recipe came.


This Wednesday evening, we’re celebrating one big year of total brilliance, lots of Rit dye and innumerable fake emeralds at Rookie's school dance-themed first year anniversary party for Fashion Week at Ace Hotel New York, hosted by Editor in Chief of the World, Tavi Gevinson. There’ll be readings from Rookie Yearbook One, gluten-free cupcakes from Babycakes, Dry Soda, a full bar from The Breslin, DJs and Confetti System frilleries all about. Wear your gnarliest letterman jacket, greased pompadour, shiniest gold tooth and sweetest snarl. RSVP here, and we’ll see you on the dance floor.

This Wednesday evening, we’re celebrating one big year of total brilliance, lots of Rit dye and innumerable fake emeralds at Rookie's school dance-themed first year anniversary party for Fashion Week at Ace Hotel New York, hosted by Editor in Chief of the World, Tavi Gevinson. There’ll be readings from Rookie Yearbook One, gluten-free cupcakes from Babycakes, Dry Soda, a full bar from The Breslin, DJs and Confetti System frilleries all about. Wear your gnarliest letterman jacket, greased pompadour, shiniest gold tooth and sweetest snarl. RSVP here, and we’ll see you on the dance floor.


Ken Friedman and April Bloomfield host the fourth annual Fergustock — three days of married meals between Fergus Henderson’s London restaurant, St. John, and their three New York institutions, two of which are housed at Ace Hotel New York. Tonight, join Fergus at The Spotted Pig for Pig Ear Terrine and Braised Pigeon. Thursday, he’ll be serving up Ox Tongue and desserts at The Breslin Bar & Dining Room, and Friday, Fergus does fish at The John Dory Oyster Bar. See full menus at Time Out New York, and remember — it’s walk-in only all three nights.

Photo by Jonathan Player for The New York Times

Ken Friedman and April Bloomfield host the fourth annual Fergustock — three days of married meals between Fergus Henderson’s London restaurant, St. John, and their three New York institutions, two of which are housed at Ace Hotel New York. Tonight, join Fergus at The Spotted Pig for Pig Ear Terrine and Braised Pigeon. Thursday, he’ll be serving up Ox Tongue and desserts at The Breslin Bar & Dining Room, and Friday, Fergus does fish at The John Dory Oyster Bar. See full menus at Time Out New York, and remember — it’s walk-in only all three nights.



Photo by Jonathan Player for The New York Times


A selection of celebratory caps and fascinators from this morning’s Royal Wedding viewing party and English Breakfast with The Breslin in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York.



Photos by Tiffany Davis and Billy Gray of The Feast New York


Everyone has their own way of celebrating, and you have to respect that. Our way is an early morning Viewing Party & English Breakfast by The Breslin tomorrow in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York, as we screen The Royal Wedding live from Westminster Abbey. English porridge and pastries, booze, coffee and tea will be available on the menu from 5:30am Friday morning. Screening begins at 6am and will continue until around noon.

Everyone has their own way of celebrating, and you have to respect that. Our way is an early morning Viewing Party & English Breakfast by The Breslin tomorrow in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York, as we screen The Royal Wedding live from Westminster Abbey. English porridge and pastries, booze, coffee and tea will be available on the menu from 5:30am Friday morning. Screening begins at 6am and will continue until around noon.


The Breslin Hotel, where the Ace Hotel New York now stands, in 1910, with very tidy taxicabs and streetcars and clouds in her hair. The window Diplo hung out of 100 years later is 5 stories up.

Thanks to Arthur Fournier of Retro|Verso.

The Breslin Hotel, where the Ace Hotel New York now stands, in 1910, with very tidy taxicabs and streetcars and clouds in her hair. The window Diplo hung out of 100 years later is 5 stories up.



Thanks to Arthur Fournier of Retro|Verso.


INTERVIEW : APRIL BLOOMFIELD // JOHN DORY & THE BRESLIN AT ACE NYC
April Bloomfield is a busy woman, being head chef at The Spotted Pig, the wildly popular Breslin and the new John Dory, Vol II. The latter two eateries flank Ace Hotel New York and are an integral part of the nightlife here. The Spotted Pig and The Breslin both received coveted Michelin Stars this year — and The New Yorker just published a wonderful, candid piece about the chef cum rock star. We were able to freeze time for a moment and speak with April about the John Dory, including a brief user’s guide for both the squeamish and gastronomically hardy (constituting much of April’s fan base).
What’s the first thing you’d recommend off the John Dory menu for someone not entirely accustomed to eating oysters?
Kumomoto oysters. They are small, sweet and easy to start with.
What about for the more seasoned shooter?
Hog Island Sweet Water oysters. They fill their larger shell with cucumber-y creaminess. (My favorite oysters.)
This is John Dory, round two. What’s different and what’s better?
This John Dory is more of a bar, more casual.
I’m sure your attention is substantially divided between the two eateries you’re helping run at Ace Hotel New York. What do you do when you get a minute to yourself? Any other favorite places in New York?
For something special I like 11 Madison Park. For somewhere more casual Torrisi is great.
Everyone seems to be very excited that the raw bar at the John Dory is open late. Have you seen a late night life developing there?
Currently we are only open until midnight, but soon we will be serving food until 2am. The bar will then continue to serve delicious cocktails created by Sasha Petraske until 4am.

INTERVIEW : APRIL BLOOMFIELD // JOHN DORY & THE BRESLIN AT ACE NYC

April Bloomfield is a busy woman, being head chef at The Spotted Pig, the wildly popular Breslin and the new John Dory, Vol II. The latter two eateries flank Ace Hotel New York and are an integral part of the nightlife here. The Spotted Pig and The Breslin both received coveted Michelin Stars this year — and The New Yorker just published a wonderful, candid piece about the chef cum rock star. We were able to freeze time for a moment and speak with April about the John Dory, including a brief user’s guide for both the squeamish and gastronomically hardy (constituting much of April’s fan base).

What’s the first thing you’d recommend off the John Dory menu for someone not entirely accustomed to eating oysters?

Kumomoto oysters. They are small, sweet and easy to start with.

What about for the more seasoned shooter?

Hog Island Sweet Water oysters. They fill their larger shell with cucumber-y creaminess. (My favorite oysters.)

This is John Dory, round two. What’s different and what’s better?

This John Dory is more of a bar, more casual.

I’m sure your attention is substantially divided between the two eateries you’re helping run at Ace Hotel New York. What do you do when you get a minute to yourself? Any other favorite places in New York?

For something special I like 11 Madison Park. For somewhere more casual Torrisi is great.

Everyone seems to be very excited that the raw bar at the John Dory is open late. Have you seen a late night life developing there?

Currently we are only open until midnight, but soon we will be serving food until 2am. The bar will then continue to serve delicious cocktails created by Sasha Petraske until 4am.



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