The team at LODOWN Magazine in Berlin are resurrecting an old prototype for an electric car from the 70s, the Electro Lotus E-Spirit. Their project is remarkable and inspiring. Check it out and support their Kickstarter.
LODOWN also just announced a new app — you can download it for free.

The team at LODOWN Magazine in Berlin are resurrecting an old prototype for an electric car from the 70s, the Electro Lotus E-Spirit. Their project is remarkable and inspiring. Check it out and support their Kickstarter.

LODOWN also just announced a new app — you can download it for free.


If you’re in Berlin during May and are in the market for a limited edition, minimalist tattoo, stop by to see our friends at Arratia Beer, a gallery in Berlin with Elizabeth Beer of Project No. 8 and Euridice Arratia. Their latest exhibition hosts Olaf Nicolai, who has created a codified alphabet and suggests that visitors select the initials of someone they love or hate — the designs embody “not just information, but also communication. You have to ask the person if you want to understand it,” Nicolai says. Tattoos will be inked off-site through May 28.

If you’re in Berlin during May and are in the market for a limited edition, minimalist tattoo, stop by to see our friends at Arratia Beer, a gallery in Berlin with Elizabeth Beer of Project No. 8 and Euridice Arratia. Their latest exhibition hosts Olaf Nicolai, who has created a codified alphabet and suggests that visitors select the initials of someone they love or hate — the designs embody “not just information, but also communication. You have to ask the person if you want to understand it,” Nicolai says. Tattoos will be inked off-site through May 28.


— BERILN III —
INTERVIEW: ELIZABETH BEER OF PROJECT NO. 8
One of our friends at Project No. 8, Elizabeth Beer, is a partner at Arratia, Beer Gallery in Berlin with her old friend Euridice Arratia, and we paid a visit while we were there. You enter the gallery through one of the cathedral-like driveway-doorways characteristic of Berlin, and once inside you get a sense of some of the immaterial essence between what ends up in the New York shops, including No. 8a, an elegant, mischievous answer to a travel shop at Ace Hotel New York. We asked Elizabeth and Euridice about the gallery, its history, and hanging out in Berlin.
What led you to open a gallery — do either of you have any history with it, or did it just seem like the right thing to do?
Euridice has a curatorial background and Elizabeth came from a mix of design and film. We curated our first show together in 2005 at Roebling Hall called “FearGear” which included a range of artists and designers like Patty Chang, 2x4, Boudicca, Mark Borthwick, Lucy Orta, Jean Shin and Sissel Tolaas. When Euridice moved to Berlin, she wanted to keep developing certain curatorial projects we had already been working on in New York. Opening a space seemed the right thing to do and Berlin offered a great platform to experiment and work with a group of talented and risk-taking artists. At first we thought about opening a not-for-profit project space. Opening a gallery in Berlin just turned out to be easier. As we had no experience with the commercial art world we just did it. 
Does the building or neighborhood where the gallery is have any history that interests you?
The gallery is located in Mehringdamm 55, Kreuzberg. Before the fall of the wall, Kreuzberg was one of the most progressive areas of the West. Now it is an area of great cultural diversity and many artists have their studios nearby. The gallery is housed in the Sarotti Hof a former chocolate factory and landmark building.
Do you find working with artists in Berlin different than NYC?
Artists living in Berlin are not under the same financial stress as the artists living in New York. In broad terms, the art community in Berlin is less hierarchical and more democratic than the one in NY. There is also more cross-pollination amongst the different disciplines. For example, many artists here participate in the alternative music scene or collaborate with musicians. It seems that there is more time to talk and brainstorm. No one reschedules appointments or meetings. 
When you’re not working, what are some of your favorite adventures, hangouts, and places to find good food and drink in Berlin?
Summer in Berlin is the best and there is nothing like getting together with a bunch of friends for a picnic at Tempelhof Park (the old airport) and then ride bikes on the runway surrounded by Fascist architecture. To unwind: the best is to spend a few hours in a Hammam. There are many in the city. For the best cocktails: Würgeengel. Each cocktail takes like 10 minutes to prepare so it requires patience. For food: I keep it simple. For a quick bite I go to Yam Yam, the Korean restaurant across the street from where I live. For a fluffy, delicious Wiener Schnitzel: Alpenstück (also in the neighborhood). An old time favorite: Jolesch (Kreuzberg).  A lot of good dancing and drinking takes place in private apartments or studios turned into semi-illegal bars and clubs for the night.
We will definitely hit you up for a tour when we’re back…

Wednesday by Carmen Herrera (1978, acrylic on canvas), on view at Arratia, Beer through April 23

— BERILN III —

INTERVIEW: ELIZABETH BEER OF PROJECT NO. 8

One of our friends at Project No. 8, Elizabeth Beer, is a partner at Arratia, Beer Gallery in Berlin with her old friend Euridice Arratia, and we paid a visit while we were there. You enter the gallery through one of the cathedral-like driveway-doorways characteristic of Berlin, and once inside you get a sense of some of the immaterial essence between what ends up in the New York shops, including No. 8a, an elegant, mischievous answer to a travel shop at Ace Hotel New York. We asked Elizabeth and Euridice about the gallery, its history, and hanging out in Berlin.

What led you to open a gallery — do either of you have any history with it, or did it just seem like the right thing to do?

Euridice has a curatorial background and Elizabeth came from a mix of design and film. We curated our first show together in 2005 at Roebling Hall called “FearGear” which included a range of artists and designers like Patty Chang, 2x4, Boudicca, Mark Borthwick, Lucy Orta, Jean Shin and Sissel Tolaas. When Euridice moved to Berlin, she wanted to keep developing certain curatorial projects we had already been working on in New York. Opening a space seemed the right thing to do and Berlin offered a great platform to experiment and work with a group of talented and risk-taking artists. At first we thought about opening a not-for-profit project space. Opening a gallery in Berlin just turned out to be easier. As we had no experience with the commercial art world we just did it. 

Does the building or neighborhood where the gallery is have any history that interests you?

The gallery is located in Mehringdamm 55, Kreuzberg. Before the fall of the wall, Kreuzberg was one of the most progressive areas of the West. Now it is an area of great cultural diversity and many artists have their studios nearby. The gallery is housed in the Sarotti Hof a former chocolate factory and landmark building.

Do you find working with artists in Berlin different than NYC?

Artists living in Berlin are not under the same financial stress as the artists living in New York. In broad terms, the art community in Berlin is less hierarchical and more democratic than the one in NY. There is also more cross-pollination amongst the different disciplines. For example, many artists here participate in the alternative music scene or collaborate with musicians. It seems that there is more time to talk and brainstorm. No one reschedules appointments or meetings. 

When you’re not working, what are some of your favorite adventures, hangouts, and places to find good food and drink in Berlin?

Summer in Berlin is the best and there is nothing like getting together with a bunch of friends for a picnic at Tempelhof Park (the old airport) and then ride bikes on the runway surrounded by Fascist architecture. To unwind: the best is to spend a few hours in a Hammam. There are many in the city. For the best cocktails: Würgeengel. Each cocktail takes like 10 minutes to prepare so it requires patience. For food: I keep it simple. For a quick bite I go to Yam Yam, the Korean restaurant across the street from where I live. For a fluffy, delicious Wiener Schnitzel: Alpenstück (also in the neighborhood). An old time favorite: Jolesch (Kreuzberg).  A lot of good dancing and drinking takes place in private apartments or studios turned into semi-illegal bars and clubs for the night.

We will definitely hit you up for a tour when we’re back…



Wednesday by Carmen Herrera (1978, acrylic on canvas), on view at Arratia, Beer through April 23


— BERLIN II —

Wye Oak live in the lobby at The Michelberger Hotel.


— BERLIN I —
INTERVIEW : TOM MICHELBERGER OF THE MICHELBERER HOTEL
No trip to Berlin, for us, is complete without some table tennis at the Michelberger Hotel with Tom. He is the Hercules, the bi-focal, the power station (and the namesake) of the Michelberger. Our hotels are like sisters in a long distance relationship. They like to glue cut-up book pages to the lamps in their lobby, and we like to glue them to the walls of our bathrooms.
We talked with Tom about their website (which is more addictive and better for you than YouTube), what inspired the Michelberger into creation, and being the last man standing.
How did the Michelberger come to be? What was your vision?
A hotel is a hands on product where a lot of people can contribute their thoughts and hands, which makes it rich and charismatic. We were just looking for a base. Our new home and the temporary home for many new people we wanted to meet. We have never done it before, but doing things for the first time has something special to it.
How does what exists now differ (in good and bad ways) from the vision?
It is better than I could have ever invisioned. In all aspects and ways. Visions are not accomplished I believe, they just put you on the way. And along that way, you have to be open for new ideas and people to join in.

The aforementioned table tennis — Alex and Tom.
Which is your favorite room in the hotel and why?
Depends on the time and day. But our restaurant is quite a distinct and inspiring place to me.
Tell us one moderately to extremely inappropriate thing that has happened in that room.
Every couple of months, I invite 15 of my football friends, we put all tables aside and play a ping pong tournament in quite shitty looking tennis outfits.
What were your influences when you began to create the Michelberger?
What we have seen in our lives and in Berlin.
If you lived in the hotel for one week with absolutely no other soul present —completely empty hotel other than Tom — what would you do for a week?
I would turn all lights off and play The National very loud in the courtyard, cook a prime steak for myself and drink a Hefeweizen. Party for one.

Study break.
I spend more time than I care to admit exploring and re-exploring your website. How much is a hotel, and its digital iterations, a playground of the mind and a place for fantasy and ridiculousness?
In a way, we want things to stand on their own, whatever we do. So we wanted the website to be worth a visit. Even if you don’t want to book a room.
Thank you, Tom.

Tom and Nadine Michelberger and Alex, considering something very important.

— BERLIN I —

INTERVIEW : TOM MICHELBERGER OF THE MICHELBERER HOTEL

No trip to Berlin, for us, is complete without some table tennis at the Michelberger Hotel with Tom. He is the Hercules, the bi-focal, the power station (and the namesake) of the Michelberger. Our hotels are like sisters in a long distance relationship. They like to glue cut-up book pages to the lamps in their lobby, and we like to glue them to the walls of our bathrooms.

We talked with Tom about their website (which is more addictive and better for you than YouTube), what inspired the Michelberger into creation, and being the last man standing.


How did the Michelberger come to be? What was your vision?

A hotel is a hands on product where a lot of people can contribute their thoughts and hands, which makes it rich and charismatic. We were just looking for a base. Our new home and the temporary home for many new people we wanted to meet. We have never done it before, but doing things for the first time has something special to it.

How does what exists now differ (in good and bad ways) from the vision?

It is better than I could have ever invisioned. In all aspects and ways. Visions are not accomplished I believe, they just put you on the way. And along that way, you have to be open for new ideas and people to join in.

The aforementioned table tennis — Alex and Tom.

Which is your favorite room in the hotel and why?

Depends on the time and day. But our restaurant is quite a distinct and inspiring place to me.

Tell us one moderately to extremely inappropriate thing that has happened in that room.

Every couple of months, I invite 15 of my football friends, we put all tables aside and play a ping pong tournament in quite shitty looking tennis outfits.

What were your influences when you began to create the Michelberger?

What we have seen in our lives and in Berlin.

If you lived in the hotel for one week with absolutely no other soul present —completely empty hotel other than Tom — what would you do for a week?

I would turn all lights off and play The National very loud in the courtyard, cook a prime steak for myself and drink a Hefeweizen. Party for one.

Study break.

I spend more time than I care to admit exploring and re-exploring your website. How much is a hotel, and its digital iterations, a playground of the mind and a place for fantasy and ridiculousness?

In a way, we want things to stand on their own, whatever we do. So we wanted the website to be worth a visit. Even if you don’t want to book a room.

Thank you, Tom.

Tom and Nadine Michelberger and Alex, considering something very important.


We saw this cool scooter this morning in Berlin.

We saw this cool scooter this morning in Berlin.


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