tokyobike have created custom bicycles for Ace Hotel London at their workshop and studio in Shoreditch. Now the bikes live with our loving if sometimes overbearing family on Shoreditch High Street, and they’ll take you wherever you want to go while you’re staying with us. You could get really meta and roll them over to tokyobike’s shop on Tabernacle Street and buy some tops and coffee. Meta tops, meta coffee. Let’s ride.

tokyobike have created custom bicycles for Ace Hotel London at their workshop and studio in Shoreditch. Now the bikes live with our loving if sometimes overbearing family on Shoreditch High Street, and they’ll take you wherever you want to go while you’re staying with us. You could get really meta and roll them over to tokyobike’s shop on Tabernacle Street and buy some tops and coffee. Meta tops, meta coffee. Let’s ride.


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INTERVIEW : JESSICA LAWRENCE

This commendable lady just biked across the nation from Portland, Oregon to the Atlantic Ocean this summer, with a brief stopover at Ace Hotel New York before she crossed the finish line. In a self-initiated tour de wellness supporting an active, grounded and playful lifestyle, Jessica has taught us so much. When she’s not riding the steel pony like a boss, she runs Cairn Guidance, consulting with public schools about health and wellness. Soon, Jessica will be celebrated by our friends at the Clinton Health Initiative and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation at the Healthy Schools Forum in Little Rock, in honor of the funds her adventure raised to fight childhood obesity.

We were really inspired by her journey and wanted to snag some photos of her in the photobooth and ask her a few questions, to which she obliged.

What was the moment at which this idea came to life and started germinating for you?

I was 15 years old and had just returned from a bicycle tour trip with other teens in Europe. I told my parents I would someday ride across the US. 23 years later, I fulfilled my dream.

When you first set rubber to road after your send-off breakfast, how massively free (and terrified) did you feel?

Three friends joined me for a few miles on their bikes from the Tin Shed Restaurant to the Springwater Corridor Trail. I remember my body was buzzing. Buzzing with excitement, independence and freedom. It was a gorgeous day. Once my friends left me, I remember looking ahead on the beautiful trail and thinking, “I’m doing this. I’m bicycling all the way across this country.” I felt more proud of myself in that moment than I ever have in my life.

Was there ever a moment where you wanted to give up? Who egged you on?

Of course there were challenging moments and days. My first challenge brought me snow in Montana (blog post entitled First Tears). My second challenge was in Kansas with thorns (6 flat tires in 2 days), 105 degree weather 4 days in a row and brutal head and side-winds. My third challenge was fatigue starting in the Appalachian Range for the last few weeks. These challenging days taught me to ask for help and reach out for support when I needed it. I might have been the one pedaling and carrying 80lbs of my own gear, but I never felt alone. Hundreds of people supported me, texted me, emailed me, posted about me, loved me, prayed for me, donated to my cause, fed me, hosted me, cheered me on and celebrated with me. A few people were there for me on a daily basis. My parents, Elin and Rick Lawrence, my personal trainer Aaron Sompson, at Kinetic Integration Manuel Therapy and Performance, Jamie Sparks, a colleague and close friend in Kentucky and Jamie Waltz, Alison Hansen and Ginny Ehrlich, all close friends. There was one day in particular I reached out to Aaron and cried. I was fatigued and didn’t know if I’d make it through the day. I rarely felt lonely as a result of all the people mentioned above.

Any revelations from the road?

Many. I would say my top three revelations include: 1. I’m so proud to be an American. I never want to take for granted how safe I felt as a female bicycling across this country (in spandex!) alone. We are fortunate that we live in such an amazing country with access to potable water and well-paved roads. Meeting Americans was the best part of the trip. People were unbelievably generous, inquisitive and supportive. 2. Laugh a lot. I loved the uncertainty of what my day would look like and where I would stay each night. It could be scary, stressful but also incredibly freeing. And, with that much alone time, you heal, process, reflect and laugh at yourself. Laughter played an important role on my trip. 3. My last revelation is the belief I can do anything I want. Doing something like this, as a solo female was the most empowering experience I’ve ever had. I’m incredibly proud of myself. Road to Rhode was a dream come true.


Thomas Callahan of Horse Cycles built the bicycle fleet that docks at Ace Hotel New York. You can take one for a spin when you stay with us or get your own. Thomas crafts these two-wheeled vessels from durable lugged steel with his own two hands and other tools in his Williamsburg, Brooklyn shop.

He’s the kind of self-taught artisan born with the itch to build beautiful things that fetch you over bridges and down rush hour streams through ravines of office tower and tenement as you peddle your way, wind-in-your-hair and glad. We’re glad each time we set eyes or ass upon any of the fine steeds in our fleet. 

Thomas’s latest venture is the Urban Tour Project, a new production line of wheel-to-frame-to-wheel all made in America bikes, because eventually we might need to get back to making things. He’s trying to get the training wheels off this new line with a Kickstarter. That’s something we can pledge allegiance to, and a couple duckets.

Thomas Callahan of Horse Cycles built the bicycle fleet that docks at Ace Hotel New York. You can take one for a spin when you stay with us or get your own. Thomas crafts these two-wheeled vessels from durable lugged steel with his own two hands and other tools in his Williamsburg, Brooklyn shop.

He’s the kind of self-taught artisan born with the itch to build beautiful things that fetch you over bridges and down rush hour streams through ravines of office tower and tenement as you peddle your way, wind-in-your-hair and glad. We’re glad each time we set eyes or ass upon any of the fine steeds in our fleet. 

Thomas’s latest venture is the Urban Tour Project, a new production line of wheel-to-frame-to-wheel all made in America bikes, because eventually we might need to get back to making things. He’s trying to get the training wheels off this new line with a Kickstarter. That’s something we can pledge allegiance to, and a couple duckets.


Jordan Hufnagel is not only our friend and one of the raddest people on the globe, he is also a top shelf bicycle crafter. Before setting off on a homemade motorcycle toward South America this summer with no possessions and no plans, he made a fleet of four beautiful Hufnagel Cycles for Ace Hotel Portland with his bare hands. We caught the process on film, and rode them all over to the hotel from his workshop in SE one late summer’s eve. Along the way, we met cop horses, innocent standers-by and a long-lost part of ourselves, it seems.

When you’re staying with us in Portland, you can rent one for the day and roll in style. They have a nice rack on the front (not that kind!) so you can pick up loot and local goods along the way.


Jordan Hufnagel made these bikes for Ace Hotel Portland with his own two hands as part of a project with Levi’s. They’re so beautiful, it brings a grease-tinged tear your eye. We rode them from Jordan’s SE Portland workshop to Ace at sundown, watching all the new shiny parts glisten like gold teeth in the waning afternoon rays, and ringing our sparkly bells annoyingly often at all whom we passed, including a troupe of mounted officers watering their fawns under the iconic Thompson Elk.
These are the last four bicycles Jordan, who’s been making bikes for half a decade, might ever build; he’s selling everything he owns except a motorcycle and some basic necessities and riding off into the West American sunset in a couple months with no plan, no route and one really good friend. He’s giving us very, very tempting ideas. The operation of this very blog may be in danger! But for now, a swing around the Park Blocks on these hot rods will thoroughly suffice. Try them out when you’re staying in town with us.

Jordan Hufnagel made these bikes for Ace Hotel Portland with his own two hands as part of a project with Levi’s. They’re so beautiful, it brings a grease-tinged tear your eye. We rode them from Jordan’s SE Portland workshop to Ace at sundown, watching all the new shiny parts glisten like gold teeth in the waning afternoon rays, and ringing our sparkly bells annoyingly often at all whom we passed, including a troupe of mounted officers watering their fawns under the iconic Thompson Elk.

These are the last four bicycles Jordan, who’s been making bikes for half a decade, might ever build; he’s selling everything he owns except a motorcycle and some basic necessities and riding off into the West American sunset in a couple months with no plan, no route and one really good friend. He’s giving us very, very tempting ideas. The operation of this very blog may be in danger! But for now, a swing around the Park Blocks on these hot rods will thoroughly suffice. Try them out when you’re staying in town with us.


Taken by our pal Jeremy Dunn of Rapha at Ace Hotel Portland.

Taken by our pal Jeremy Dunn of Rapha at Ace Hotel Portland.


Horse Cycles has built a fleet of hand-made bicycles for Ace Hotel New York, and filmmaker Matt McClain spun this portrait of the man responsible, Thomas Callahan, at his shop in Brooklyn. You can borrow one when you’re in town.


Back in August we hosted Get in the Saddle with Levi’s and Urban Outfitters at Ace Hotel New York — the mobile bike shop is part of a celebration for the release of the 511 Commuter. This cross-country journey is now culminating in Portland at the Oregon Manifest, an organization and celebration that believes bikes make the world a better place for everyone. We feel the same way.

Oregon Manifest is celebrating their challenge this weekend September 23 & 24 with a competition to design and build the ultimate utility bike. They are a pretty amazing organization — “We exist to celebrate and amplify bike craft, design and innovation. We believe that real innovation happens in workshops, garages, design houses and schools. We value the process of making, the spirit of ingenuity and the passion of brave undertakings.”

Keep an eye out for our friend Jordan Hufnagel's creation. He'll also be making a few custom bikes for Ace Portland with the help from our friends at Levi's. Stay posted for that unveiling soon.

You can find the Levi’s x UO Bike shop around Portland throughout the weekend — on Friday at PNCA from 4-8pm and at the Chris King manufactory Saturday from 2:30-6pm.


A gaggle of handsome creatures: Donovan, front desk heartthrob at Ace Hotel Portland, and our fleet of guns for hire — guests can borrow these sweet bikes at will and enjoy all this anomalous Northwest sunshine.

Photo posted to Twitter by We’re Kinda Fancy

A gaggle of handsome creatures: Donovan, front desk heartthrob at Ace Hotel Portland, and our fleet of guns for hire — guests can borrow these sweet bikes at will and enjoy all this anomalous Northwest sunshine.



Photo posted to Twitter by We’re Kinda Fancy


Get in the Saddle happened at Ace Hotel New York — Levi’s and Urban Outfitters traveling bicycle bonanza. Here are some moments from the ground, including an inventory of steep prices for repair work and replacement parts.






Photos from Smith & Ratliff and VeloJoy.

Get in the Saddle happened at Ace Hotel New York — Levi’s and Urban Outfitters traveling bicycle bonanza. Here are some moments from the ground, including an inventory of steep prices for repair work and replacement parts.

Photos from Smith & Ratliff and VeloJoy.


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