Tantric paintings collected by French poet Franck Andre Jamme’s in Tantra Song — one of the many beautiful books available at Monograph Bookwerks in Portland, Oregon. They were part of the Publication Fair with Publication Studio at Ace Hotel Portland today — you’ll be hearing more about Monograph here in the near future.

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Tantric paintings collected by French poet Franck Andre Jamme’s in Tantra Song — one of the many beautiful books available at Monograph Bookwerks in Portland, Oregon. They were part of the Publication Fair with Publication Studio at Ace Hotel Portland today — you’ll be hearing more about Monograph here in the near future.


INTERVIEW : ROMAN & WILLIAMS

Celebrating a decade of incredible work, Roman and Williams' Robin Standefer and Stephen Alesch signed copies of their new book Roman and Williams Buildings & Interiors : Things We Made with some friends and a gallery of shots in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York last week — you can grab signed copies of this beautiful tome on our shop. We’re old friends with Robin and Stephen, and our studio director, Eric, and interiors maestro Loren worked on the Roman and Williams team when Ace Hotel New York was taking shape. They had a chance to sit down with Stephen and Robin amidst the mayhem to ask about the book, their work together and the subconscious.

Robin and Stephen, you still appear from time to time in Eric and Loren’s dreams. Do you find that creative collaboration spiked with a sobering dose of real business tends to dye the subconscious in this way, and do all the collaborators and team members you’ve had continue to affect your psyche?

Well everything that’s difficult tends to dye the subconscious and work itself into dreams, and we are and always have been difficult. We are proud of that tradition. Easy things are forgettable and have no impact –- no staying power. No dream or haunting qualities ever came from something easy.

The title Things We Made speaks to a sort of portfolio of finished products, however we know how important the process of design is, and how imperfections in that process go into your work, aka “fucking things up.” Will readers get any insight into this rebellious stance?

We hope so! We really put so much work into creating a book that would give insight into our ethos –- where readers could get a sense of us as people, not just our projects. We included hundreds of drawings –- we even drew on the drawings. And the text is a series of conversations, rather than just descriptions.

The book celebrates a “decade of design” — what do you hope the next decade will bring in terms of your studio and practice?

Even more humanistic, careful and unpretentious design. We hope to spread the warmth that the Ace embodies. We’d love to design an airport or a hospital in a way that would move people. The International Style, and what it has bred, and benign contemporary design have made for boring, dreary places that need to me be made more interesting –- interesting for everyone, and not just for architects and designers.

We love your beautiful spot in Montauk — how did the garden do this year? For the green thumbs out there, what’s your favorite vegetable to grow?

It was a hot summer and the garden was absolutely prolific. This year, we built eight-foot tall towers for our tomatoes and we grew eight different varieties. We have been harvesting them well into late October. We never thought they would grow that high – but they did –- they could have grown another few feet even! Our peppers also did well this year because of the heat.

We love growing cabbages, artichokes, and brussell sprouts -– vegetables that take two years to harvest. It is fascinating to watch the process -– how the vegetables grow over one summer, how they retract over the winter and then explode the following spring into super vegetable power.

We’ve also love growing medicinal plants like Angelika, Wormwood and Echinacea, which we like to use. We could go on …

In the act of making things there are many people involved in the process, especially with international projects internationally. In your experience, are Americans still good at “making things”?

Absolutely. American manufacturing almost disappeared — another price of the post-war obsession with cheapening architecture and design. It focused on zero craft and lack of detail. American manufacturing is known for being meaty, strong, simple and good. Things we love. We try to support American craftsmanship as much as we can. It is hard to convince developers and owners to pay more for things made in this country, to pay for things that last longer, but we do the best we can. Whenever we build something for ourselves, this is always the case.

We blessed to call you family and we’re honored to call you friends — excited to see what the next decade brings.

We feel the same about the Ace team. The world is a better place with Ace in it. Thank you. So proud to have had our book party in the Living Room! It’s the project that’s closest to our hearts. Thank you!

Photos from the Billy Farrell Agency


We’re very excited for the book launch of Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies: Lafayette Park, Detroit — published by Placement Books — at No. 8a, the Ace New York branch of Project No. 8 and Various Projects, tonight at No. 8a off our lobby from 7-9pm.
Lafayette Park, an affordable middle-class residential area in downtown Detroit, is home to the largest collection of buildings designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe in the world. Today, it is one of Detroit’s most racially-integrated and economically stable neighborhoods, although it is surrounded by evidence of a city in financial distress. Through interviews with and essays by residents, reproductions of archival material, new photographs by Karin Jobst, Vasco Roma and Corine Vermeulen, and previously unpublished photographs by documentary filmmaker Janine Debanné, Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies examines the way that Lafayette Park residents confront and interact with this unique modernist environment. 
Lafayette Park has not received the level of international attention that other similar projects by Mies have. This may be due in part to its location in Detroit, a city whose most positive qualities and cultural power are often overlooked in the media. 
This book is a reaction against the way that iconic modernist architecture is often represented. Whereas other writers may focus on the design intentions of the architect, authors Aubert, Cavar and Chandani seek to show the organic and idiosyncratic ways that the people who live in Lafayette Park actually use the architecture and how this experience, in turn, affects their everyday lives. While there are many publications about abandoned buildings in Detroit and about the city’s prosperous past, this book is about a remarkable part of the city as it exists today, in the twenty-first century.
We’ll see you tonight for a signing and launch party in one of our favorite shops in the world — we’d live in a glass house with them any day.

We’re very excited for the book launch of Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies: Lafayette Park, Detroit — published by Placement Books — at No. 8a, the Ace New York branch of Project No. 8 and Various Projects, tonight at No. 8a off our lobby from 7-9pm.

Lafayette Park, an affordable middle-class residential area in downtown Detroit, is home to the largest collection of buildings designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe in the world. Today, it is one of Detroit’s most racially-integrated and economically stable neighborhoods, although it is surrounded by evidence of a city in financial distress. Through interviews with and essays by residents, reproductions of archival material, new photographs by Karin Jobst, Vasco Roma and Corine Vermeulen, and previously unpublished photographs by documentary filmmaker Janine Debanné, Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies examines the way that Lafayette Park residents confront and interact with this unique modernist environment. 

Lafayette Park has not received the level of international attention that other similar projects by Mies have. This may be due in part to its location in Detroit, a city whose most positive qualities and cultural power are often overlooked in the media. 

This book is a reaction against the way that iconic modernist architecture is often represented. Whereas other writers may focus on the design intentions of the architect, authors Aubert, Cavar and Chandani seek to show the organic and idiosyncratic ways that the people who live in Lafayette Park actually use the architecture and how this experience, in turn, affects their everyday lives. While there are many publications about abandoned buildings in Detroit and about the city’s prosperous past, this book is about a remarkable part of the city as it exists today, in the twenty-first century.

We’ll see you tonight for a signing and launch party in one of our favorite shops in the world — we’d live in a glass house with them any day.


The Unified Field is an arts and literature journal inspired in part by the spirit of Wallace Berman’s Semina series. Bringing together disparate elements — high/low, academic/primal, sound/page, image/word —  each issue unites a wide array of contributors under an overarching theme. 
Inaugural ISSUE 01 transition features 60 full-color pages of contributions including Damien Echols of the West Memphis Three, feminist icon Gloria Steinem, SPIN Editorial DirectorCharles Aaron, music photographer Autumn de Wilde and a clear vinyl 10” featuring unreleased tracks by Robin Pecknold of Fleet Foxes, Bonnie Prince Billy, Amen Dunes and Department of Eagles. 
You can score this limited edition of 1000 hand-numbered copies of The Unified Field magazine ISSUE 01 now on our online shop. And better yet, all proceeds are donated to 826 National, a writing, publishing and tutoring non-profit serving under-resourced youth. 

The Unified Field is an arts and literature journal inspired in part by the spirit of Wallace Berman’s Semina series. Bringing together disparate elements — high/low, academic/primal, sound/page, image/word —  each issue unites a wide array of contributors under an overarching theme. 

Inaugural ISSUE 01 transition features 60 full-color pages of contributions including Damien Echols of the West Memphis Three, feminist icon Gloria Steinem, SPIN Editorial DirectorCharles Aaron, music photographer Autumn de Wilde and a clear vinyl 10” featuring unreleased tracks by Robin Pecknold of Fleet Foxes, Bonnie Prince Billy, Amen Dunes and Department of Eagles

You can score this limited edition of 1000 hand-numbered copies of The Unified Field magazine ISSUE 01 now on our online shop. And better yet, all proceeds are donated to 826 National, a writing, publishing and tutoring non-profit serving under-resourced youth. 


April Bloomfield is a busy woman — head chef at the Michelin-starred Spotted Pig and Breslin Bar & Dining Room, and the new John Dory Oyster Bar (on its second life). The latter two eateries flank Ace Hotel New York and are an integral part of the nightlife here. Ms. Bloomfield is the ultimate chef-cum-rock-star — an edge-pusher who as remained true to her roots all the way to the figurative and literal bank — and her fan base consists of both the squeamish and gastronomically hardy. We adore her, and are proud to be her neighbor and collaborator.
April’s new narrative cookbook, A Girl and Her Pig, over-brims with stories, beautiful drawings and photographs, and the recipes that have made her the culinary gem she is. Signed copies are now available on our online shop — grab one of our small batch of copies; it’s a good read whether you’re smearing the pages with ingredients or hunkering down for a tour around the mind of one of our most cherished (albeit transplanted) national treasures.

April Bloomfield is a busy woman — head chef at the Michelin-starred Spotted Pig and Breslin Bar & Dining Room, and the new John Dory Oyster Bar (on its second life). The latter two eateries flank Ace Hotel New York and are an integral part of the nightlife here. Ms. Bloomfield is the ultimate chef-cum-rock-star — an edge-pusher who as remained true to her roots all the way to the figurative and literal bank — and her fan base consists of both the squeamish and gastronomically hardy. We adore her, and are proud to be her neighbor and collaborator.

April’s new narrative cookbook, A Girl and Her Pig, over-brims with stories, beautiful drawings and photographs, and the recipes that have made her the culinary gem she is. Signed copies are now available on our online shop — grab one of our small batch of copies; it’s a good read whether you’re smearing the pages with ingredients or hunkering down for a tour around the mind of one of our most cherished (albeit transplanted) national treasures.


Our collaboration with The Impossible Project landed in Taken By Surprise: Cutting-Edge Collaborations between Designers, Artists, and Brands, published by German publishing house Gestalten. The book highlights nontraditional brand communication, focusing on significant artists and collaborations. Ace Hotel x Impossible is featured alongside Julian Schnabel and Maybach, Sagmeister and Levi’s, Olafur Eliasson and BMW, and Terry Richardson and Collette amongst others. We’re truly honored.
The Ace Hotel x Impossible Project show “24 Hours at Ace” — a gallery show of instant analog photography on Ace Hotel x Impossible Project film — is up in The Impossible Project Space Tokyo through July 8. If you haven’t seen it, fear not — we’ll have another community generated show at Ace Hotel New York in the fall. You can still buy film on our online shop and submit photos to our online gallery. 

Our collaboration with The Impossible Project landed in Taken By Surprise: Cutting-Edge Collaborations between Designers, Artists, and Brands, published by German publishing house Gestalten. The book highlights nontraditional brand communication, focusing on significant artists and collaborations. Ace Hotel x Impossible is featured alongside Julian Schnabel and Maybach, Sagmeister and Levi’s, Olafur Eliasson and BMW, and Terry Richardson and Collette amongst others. We’re truly honored.

The Ace Hotel x Impossible Project show “24 Hours at Ace” — a gallery show of instant analog photography on Ace Hotel x Impossible Project film — is up in The Impossible Project Space Tokyo through July 8. If you haven’t seen it, fear not — we’ll have another community generated show at Ace Hotel New York in the fall. You can still buy film on our online shop and submit photos to our online gallery


An afternoon shot from Publication Studio in Portland, maker of special, constructed-one-at-a-time-by-hand books sold all over the world. They’re throwing a collaborative event on July 2 at the Brooklyn Grange Farm, a zero chemical input commercial urban farm located on a New York City rooftop. Friends of Publication Studio have been hard at work designing and constructing a very large dining table in the middle of the farm and under the open sky. Tickets are limited so save yourself a deep and insurmountable regret by buying yours as soon as possible — the first 15 tickets sold include a walking tour of disappeared NYC bookstores, and all tickets include an incredible dinner and a copy of P.S. co-founder and Guggenheim Fellow Matthew Stadler’s novel Chloe Jarren’s La Cucaracha.
The walking bookstore tour covers those with personal import to the author followed by a six-course dinner by Benjamin Walmer of Highlands Dinner Club. Toasts, reading and conversation with the author and the chef, whose work explores and exploits transdisciplinary design opportunities within architecture, food systems and social innovation.

An afternoon shot from Publication Studio in Portland, maker of special, constructed-one-at-a-time-by-hand books sold all over the world. They’re throwing a collaborative event on July 2 at the Brooklyn Grange Farm, a zero chemical input commercial urban farm located on a New York City rooftop. Friends of Publication Studio have been hard at work designing and constructing a very large dining table in the middle of the farm and under the open sky. Tickets are limited so save yourself a deep and insurmountable regret by buying yours as soon as possible — the first 15 tickets sold include a walking tour of disappeared NYC bookstores, and all tickets include an incredible dinner and a copy of P.S. co-founder and Guggenheim Fellow Matthew Stadler’s novel Chloe Jarren’s La Cucaracha.

The walking bookstore tour covers those with personal import to the author followed by a six-course dinner by Benjamin Walmer of Highlands Dinner Club. Toasts, reading and conversation with the author and the chef, whose work explores and exploits transdisciplinary design opportunities within architecture, food systems and social innovation.


Publication Studio — maker and destroyer of books — will be in New York on Thursday evening, April 28, for a free public event, announcing their Spring Line 2011. You should go make friends of them — they are smart and winsome people, and they mix strong drinks and make even stronger books, both in content and form.
Meet at Heathers at 506 East 13th Street, New York, between 7 and 9pm. Authors (or their surrogates) walk the Spring Line runway at 7:30pm. There’ll be music by DJDK and beautiful books available for sale throughout.
The PS crew includes Matthew Stadler, Patricia No and David Knowles and they are joined by artists and authors Matt Keegan, Christine Shan Shan Hou, Lawrence Rinder, Colter Jacobsen, Ruby Sky Stiler, Dodie Bellamy, Carl Skoggard, Carter, Ari Marcopoulos, John Motley, Stacy Doris, Luisa Valenzuela, Joseph Redwood-Martinez and Collassus.


Images from a book by Adrienne Yancey with Publication Studio

Publication Studio — maker and destroyer of books — will be in New York on Thursday evening, April 28, for a free public event, announcing their Spring Line 2011. You should go make friends of them — they are smart and winsome people, and they mix strong drinks and make even stronger books, both in content and form.

Meet at Heathers at 506 East 13th Street, New York, between 7 and 9pm. Authors (or their surrogates) walk the Spring Line runway at 7:30pm. There’ll be music by DJDK and beautiful books available for sale throughout.

The PS crew includes Matthew Stadler, Patricia No and David Knowles and they are joined by artists and authors Matt Keegan, Christine Shan Shan Hou, Lawrence Rinder, Colter Jacobsen, Ruby Sky Stiler, Dodie Bellamy, Carl Skoggard, Carter, Ari Marcopoulos, John Motley, Stacy Doris, Luisa Valenzuela, Joseph Redwood-Martinez and Collassus.



Images from a book by Adrienne Yancey with Publication Studio


From the Second Annual Publication Fair we hosted with Publication Studio at Ace Hotel Portland earlier this month.

Photo by Kate Bing Burt

From the Second Annual Publication Fair we hosted with Publication Studio at Ace Hotel Portland earlier this month.



Photo by Kate Bing Burt


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