Clyde Common’s head chef, Chris DiMino ”Goes to Work” — debuting the Levi’s Fall 2013 collection.


We have a serious eating disorder called ClydeCommonitus. We don’t want to eat anywhere else. Chris DiMinno is just a totally fucked up genius. We stopped in the other day for a sampling of some new things on the menu beginning with smoked trout chowder and a salad of seared braised bacon, frisée, fingerling potatoes and sauce gribiche, followed by porchetta, shelling beans, pickle relish, and poached eggs. A pair of dishes that cast every other dish you’ve eaten in your life in a very unflattering light. We devoured a quiche of Calabrian chili, rosemary, blue cheese and caramelized onion followed by a beef tongue omelette with horseradish, romesco, grilled onion and potato croutons. As in, crispy croutons made of potato. You do the math.
After we loosened our belts a bit, we wept with joy into a chef’s board of brûléed french toast with spiced apples and an almond butter parfait topped with roasted almonds. We died, and then we started counting the days until we could go back.
Stay tuned for more from Chris and his team here — we’ll be posting recipes, good ideas and food porn on the regular.

We have a serious eating disorder called ClydeCommonitus. We don’t want to eat anywhere else. Chris DiMinno is just a totally fucked up genius. We stopped in the other day for a sampling of some new things on the menu beginning with smoked trout chowder and a salad of seared braised bacon, frisée, fingerling potatoes and sauce gribiche, followed by porchetta, shelling beans, pickle relish, and poached eggs. A pair of dishes that cast every other dish you’ve eaten in your life in a very unflattering light. We devoured a quiche of Calabrian chili, rosemary, blue cheese and caramelized onion followed by a beef tongue omelette with horseradish, romesco, grilled onion and potato croutons. As in, crispy croutons made of potato. You do the math.

After we loosened our belts a bit, we wept with joy into a chef’s board of brûléed french toast with spiced apples and an almond butter parfait topped with roasted almonds. We died, and then we started counting the days until we could go back.

Stay tuned for more from Chris and his team here — we’ll be posting recipes, good ideas and food porn on the regular.


We shamelessly destroyed plate after plate of Clyde Common's new lunch menu recently — get ye that way soon and join us in exaltation. The smoked pork loin sandwich with carraway mustard and bacon-braised cabbage can be found Jackson Pollock’d all over our shirtfront, and the steamed manila clams, Italian sausage and Calabrian chile can still be seen floating around our crown chakra like ACME bluebirds. The crack-like nectar in which it steeps should be illegal.
If you’re as butch as us, you might want to try following your third course of smoked sturgeon, crème fraîche, pickles and a seven minute egg (on a little wooden canoe) with chef Chris Dimmino's take on “steak frites” — bavette, fingerling potato and a show-stopping kimchi purée.
Chris’ mastery of nuance is showcased nowhere better than his sauces, soups and use of smoke — and he’s done well to replace a plethora of sandwiches on the lunch menu with the stuff we really go to Clyde for — his orchestral subtlety, and confidence with flavor.
Here’s hoping no one saw us eat four plates of food in half an hour, and here’s to next time (likely tomorrow).

We shamelessly destroyed plate after plate of Clyde Common's new lunch menu recently — get ye that way soon and join us in exaltation. The smoked pork loin sandwich with carraway mustard and bacon-braised cabbage can be found Jackson Pollock’d all over our shirtfront, and the steamed manila clams, Italian sausage and Calabrian chile can still be seen floating around our crown chakra like ACME bluebirds. The crack-like nectar in which it steeps should be illegal.

If you’re as butch as us, you might want to try following your third course of smoked sturgeon, crème fraîche, pickles and a seven minute egg (on a little wooden canoe) with chef Chris Dimmino's take on “steak frites” — bavette, fingerling potato and a show-stopping kimchi purée.

Chris’ mastery of nuance is showcased nowhere better than his sauces, soups and use of smoke — and he’s done well to replace a plethora of sandwiches on the lunch menu with the stuff we really go to Clyde for — his orchestral subtlety, and confidence with flavor.

Here’s hoping no one saw us eat four plates of food in half an hour, and here’s to next time (likely tomorrow).


We are incredibly honored to share a building in downtown Portland with Clyde Common, our in-house, internationally celebrated restaurant and lobby bar at Ace Hotel Portland, for many reasons, not the least of which is that we get frequent exposure to the genius workings of the mind of chef Chris DiMinno. His latest revelation is this plate of early June vegetables (house-pickled, freshly harvested, still tasting of earth) with mâche on a spread of truffle yogurt so smooth and unbelievably good you basically want to wear it.
We closed our wanton eyes like Tilda Swinton as we savored this dish, and envisioned a disc of gold hovering over Chris’ head. Fortunately, and unsurprisingly, The James Beard Foundation has taken notice and will host a woodland feast by Chris and Clyde co-owner Nate Tilden on June 16, with wine and eggs by Big Table Farm. The menu will lead Manhattan’s city-dwelling diners into the Oregon forests, with dishes like hay-cured salmon and seared foie gras in ash. Furthermore, New Yorkers will be introduced to the delectable delight that is Olympic Provisions’ chocolate salami. See the full menu and get a reservation here.
If you’re in Portland and won’t be able to make it to dinner in NYC next week, tonight and tomorrow are your last chances to experience a preview of each course — through tomorrow night, Chris will feature a James Beard Dish on the already worthy and stunning Clyde menu. Spontaneous omnivorism is required, reservations are not.


Photos by Hunter Gatherer

We are incredibly honored to share a building in downtown Portland with Clyde Common, our in-house, internationally celebrated restaurant and lobby bar at Ace Hotel Portland, for many reasons, not the least of which is that we get frequent exposure to the genius workings of the mind of chef Chris DiMinno. His latest revelation is this plate of early June vegetables (house-pickled, freshly harvested, still tasting of earth) with mâche on a spread of truffle yogurt so smooth and unbelievably good you basically want to wear it.

We closed our wanton eyes like Tilda Swinton as we savored this dish, and envisioned a disc of gold hovering over Chris’ head. Fortunately, and unsurprisingly, The James Beard Foundation has taken notice and will host a woodland feast by Chris and Clyde co-owner Nate Tilden on June 16, with wine and eggs by Big Table Farm. The menu will lead Manhattan’s city-dwelling diners into the Oregon forests, with dishes like hay-cured salmon and seared foie gras in ash. Furthermore, New Yorkers will be introduced to the delectable delight that is Olympic Provisions’ chocolate salami. See the full menu and get a reservation here.

If you’re in Portland and won’t be able to make it to dinner in NYC next week, tonight and tomorrow are your last chances to experience a preview of each course — through tomorrow night, Chris will feature a James Beard Dish on the already worthy and stunning Clyde menu. Spontaneous omnivorism is required, reservations are not.



Photos by Hunter Gatherer


INTERVIEW: CHRIS DIMINNO OF CLYDE COMMON

Chris DiMinno is head chef at Clyde Common, the celebrated restaurant at Ace Hotel Portland. Chris has innovated local, seasonal cuisine by working closely with regional farms and his brilliant staff to create an experience that woos newcomers and the Portland foodie old guard alike.

Food & Wine has nominated Chris for Best New Chef in the Northwest (which surprises no one). Go express your love by voting for him — the race to the finish ends tomorrow.

He shard some words with us about nerdy breakfasts, keeping dollars streaming back to local farms, and junk food.

Food at the Clyde riffs on the adventurous, regionally loyal spirit of the Northwest, with particular high notes in favor of Portland. When you’re creating the menu, are you thinking of locals or of Ace guests and other travelers coming through and experiencing this local fare for the first time?

When we’re creating the dishes, we think of everyone. There are certain dishes on the menu that everyone can enjoy, and then there are some dishes for the more adventuous eater. I like that I can work in a restaurant where two people can sit at a table; one person can order the burger and the other can order the crispy fried calves’ brains.

What’s your guiding inspiration for Clyde cuisine? The menu changes frequently but always has a recognizable personality.

My inspiration for the food at the Clyde comes from many places. It was somewhat of a coincidence that my style of food was in-line with Clyde before I even got to Portland. Now I base the food mostly on the pristine produce, meat and fish that comes from the Pacific Northwest, as well as my past experiences in other restaurants. I am also very fortunate to have a staff that contributes many ideas to the menu, and we all work together to make sure the dish is appropriate for the restaurant.

What are some of your most prized relationships with local farmers, fishers and ranchers?

I am very fortunate to work with many local farmers, and when possible we get as much of our product as possible from them. I love to give local farmers money. It really makes a difference. Our lamb comes from Cattail Creek Farm, and our pigs come from Square Peg Farm. Our produce comes from a variety of different sources in the area, and when the farmers’ markets are open, we are there three times a week.

Tell me about a typical breakfast you make at home on a busy morning.

When it comes to breakfast, I’m a bit of a nerd. I sort of have the breakfast on the back of the Honey Nut Cheerios box. A bowl of cereal, a glass of orange juice, a cup of yogurt, a banana and usually about 5 cups of coffee.

And favorite junk food in Portland?

Portland is amazing for junk food. I’m addicted to anything that comes out of the kitchen at Bunk Sandwiches, I’m a sucker for the enormous plate of Nachos at the Matador, and the burritos at Los gorditos are amazing.  



Photo by Allison Jones


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