New York City

Chris Tucci — illustrator, animator, universal charmer and hero behind our long standing Sunday Night Live music series in the lobby of Ace Hotel New York — recently finished this bewildering animation for Streets of Laredo. We can’t decide which part we like the most.


I’VE GOT A HOLE IN MY SOUL : BEYONDADOUBTRON BUFORD & URAL THOMAS : DEEP SOUL PT. I
About ten years ago, there was a very well put together woman selling a few 45s out of a plastic bag on street in Portland. She said they had been her father’s but that she had no turntable. She only wanted what seemed like a few bucks for the whole tattered bodega bag. In it I found some of Seattle’s holy grail, hard soul gems, namely, both Ron Buford on Camelot.
The singer on the stand-out track is Ural Thomas, who she said still lived in the neighborhood. Deep Soul Part 1 is still one of the greatest, high-energy tracks of the era, and to our amazement Ural Thomas is still performing it around PDX. This Saturday he’s headlining Downtown at Star Theater and the platters will be turned with the assistance of me, Danny Dodge (No Tomorrow Boys) and DJ HWY7. And I’ll be getting my record signed at long last.

This is the second chapter in our new rare vinyl series with Beyondadoubt, a Portland-based producer, beatmaker, DJ and collector.

I’VE GOT A HOLE IN MY SOUL : BEYONDADOUBT
RON BUFORD & URAL THOMAS : DEEP SOUL PT. I

About ten years ago, there was a very well put together woman selling a few 45s out of a plastic bag on street in Portland. She said they had been her father’s but that she had no turntable. She only wanted what seemed like a few bucks for the whole tattered bodega bag. In it I found some of Seattle’s holy grail, hard soul gems, namely, both Ron Buford on Camelot.

The singer on the stand-out track is Ural Thomas, who she said still lived in the neighborhood. Deep Soul Part 1 is still one of the greatest, high-energy tracks of the era, and to our amazement Ural Thomas is still performing it around PDX. This Saturday he’s headlining Downtown at Star Theater and the platters will be turned with the assistance of me, Danny Dodge (No Tomorrow Boys) and DJ HWY7. And I’ll be getting my record signed at long last.

This is the second chapter in our new rare vinyl series with Beyondadoubt, a Portland-based producer, beatmaker, DJ and collector.


I’VE GOT A HOLE IN MY SOUL : BEYONDADOUBT
BOBBY “BLUE” BLAND, RIP 23 JUNE 2013

Bobby Blue Bland was one of the great great great voices to come out of Memphis, Tennessee. My favorite quote from his interview with my friend Andria Lisle for Mojo Magazine: “The things I did have staying power. There’s a certain way you say ‘baby.’ You don’t just say it – you have to make somebody feel it.”

My first introduction to Bobby Blue Bland was a high priced LP on the wall of a Memphis record store where I worked for several years. At $100 it was far out of my price range. When I moved to Portland years ago and helped open a new record shop on Mississippi Street, I found a copy of the original 1961 album “Two Steps From The Blues” in the dollar bin. It has since remained one of my favorite long-players of all time — beautiful and haunting. Bobby goes from blues to soul to big band without ever losing genuineness.

Last night, hearing of his death, I lit a candle & listened in the dark. Tonight I would recommend you do the same.

Bobby Blue Bland

The first in our new rare vinyl feature with Beyondadoubt. Keep an eye out for new installations.




In 1986, Bruce Pavitt was a DJ at Seattle’s KCMU (now KEXP) and writer for The Rocket, when he released a compilation album called the Sub Pop 100. You may have heard of the record label that grew from these auspicious beginnings. Heavily associated with a genre called ‘grunge’ at one point, Sub Pop has continued to evolve since that time, somehow surviving the near-total collapse of the record industry despite releasing albums with titles like Heavens to Murgatroyd, Even! It’s Thee Headcoats! (Already). Bruce is an old friend and he’s on tour with Experiencing Nirvana: Grunge in Europe, 1989, his new photo journal and grunge micro-history of eight days of yore he spent on the road with a fairly quintessential trio of Seattle bands — Tad, Mudhoney and Nirvana. So we asked if he could stop by and hold court in the lobby at Ace New York tonight and he obliged.

In 1986, Bruce Pavitt was a DJ at Seattle’s KCMU (now KEXP) and writer for The Rocket, when he released a compilation album called the Sub Pop 100. You may have heard of the record label that grew from these auspicious beginnings. Heavily associated with a genre called ‘grunge’ at one point, Sub Pop has continued to evolve since that time, somehow surviving the near-total collapse of the record industry despite releasing albums with titles like Heavens to Murgatroyd, Even! It’s Thee Headcoats! (Already). Bruce is an old friend and he’s on tour with Experiencing Nirvana: Grunge in Europe, 1989, his new photo journal and grunge micro-history of eight days of yore he spent on the road with a fairly quintessential trio of Seattle bands — TadMudhoney and Nirvana. So we asked if he could stop by and hold court in the lobby at Ace New York tonight and he obliged.


INTERVIEW : DJ MURSI LAYNE

Trinidad-born Mursi Layne, co-founder, with Alexis Casson, of The Artchitects, spun with Tom Tom Magazine at Ace New York during October — and she’s back on the decks Monday night at Bembe in Brooklyn. A turntablist who prefers the wheels of steel to all that audio digitalis, she’s been mixing her bad self into a wider range of roles as deejay, documentarian and voice for her communities. We talked with her about Hands On mini-ball DJ MikeQ, being homesick, and the hats she wore back in the day, including some that she’s still wearing in the here and now.

What age were you when you arrived in New York and what song, sound or smell reminds you of that moment?

My first visit to NYC was at age 13. My mom and dad had already lived here for at least 8 years. My dad was a driver back then and every time he picked me up, he had a cassette tape with steel drums playing. I was into Dancehall and Soca, so I really couldn’t take the steel drums for too long. However, it reminded me of home — Trinidad — which I missed. I don’t hear steel drums often, so when I do it takes me back to my first time in New York. 

The term Afropunk is a part of the lexicon for a wider audience, especially since Afropunk Fest hit Brooklyn in August. You’ve been involved — it’s a website, it’s a festival, it’s a lot of bigger things. What is it to you?

The Peculiar Kind has partnered with Afropunk to be the LGBT voice on the AP network. We also had a booth set up at the festival this year. To me, the term Afropunk has become synonymous with “community.” Although most New Yorkers are much more open-minded than some, there’s still a sense of hatred toward others for being “different.” Whether it be because of skin color, sexual orientation or any way you present yourself to the world that isn’t considered the norm. It was amazing to see such a diverse crowd together in one space celebrating art, music, love and life.

You’ve been getting around the globe quite a bit for work. What’s the most exciting regional sound for you right now? 

This is really tough because I have so many sounds that get me going at the moment. My DJ sets are like a melting pot! I can go anywhere from cunty beats like MikeQ-produced tracks to Stuttastep tunes such as DJ Kiva’s remix of Erykah Badu’s Out My Mind, Just in Time. At some parties, I have to throw in some Soca and Dancehall, naturally, because I am an island girl. Speaking of regional sound, I am super excited to guest DJ this Monday at iBomba, a monthly party where deejays spin a fusion of Global, Bass, Digital, Cumbia, Future and Dancehall.   

You’re working on a documentary for The Peculiar Kind with The Artchitects. Tell us about it.

The documentary is based on a web series where Alexis Casson and I, known as The Artchitects, have candid and unscripted conversations with queer women of color about issues within the LGBTQ community. The ultimate goal is to build awareness and expose the world to a subculture that is often misunderstood. You can get it on DVD, and you can arrange screenings through our website — Season Two of the web series will begin production in Spring 2013.


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