INTERVIEW : EMILY BAKER OF SWORD AND FERN

Emily Baker’s an OG jewelry designer, universe-maker and inspirational mover-shaker we’re lucky enough to call a neighbor and a friend in Portland, Oregon. Her line of jewelry, Sword + Fern — and the shop where it grows as thick as moss — acted as a catalyst for Portland design back in the day. We love watching her world expand — with sweetheart, Lovers synth-programmer and performance artist Kerby Ferris — into a life-giving and electro-sparked atmosphere in a league of its own.

Tonight, Emily takes over room 205 at Ace Hotel Portland for Content 2012, creating a sound installation with Kerby that will blow your fucking mind. Tickets can be picked up at Ace Hotel Portland, and $5 of each goes toward New York Cares to aid in hurricane relief efforts. Below, she gives a glimpse into what’s in store for us and talks about her new F/W collection, Memorizer. 

The new jewelry collection, Memorizer, is inspired by the ancient Pacific Northwest First Nations myth of Copper Woman, the First Mother of civilization — her warrior training traditions, wisdom and the power of intuition. I let my senses rule my process; my most beloved way to work is gathering materials by happenstance and sponteneity, messing up and leaving it, then coming back to it again. I found fluidity, the concept of water logic, and the secret world of my own tiny joys came to the surface while I was working on Memorizer.

The alchemic imperfections of hand-cut copper, hand-dyed wood in ombre chakra tones, engraved graphics on leather, silkscreened scarves, cast concrete and cut mirrors all blend together to tell the story of a secret society’s traditions and their visions of women’s ancient wisdom, power and strength, taking the wearer on a joyride to the space alive inside their own personal landscapes.

YOUJOY in room 205 will be a sensory exploration of shape and sound. Kerby’s bandmate Emily has been immersing as of late in Shambhala Buddhist teachings from Pema Chödrön and Chögyam Trungpa — and her current mantra, YOUJOY, emphasizes these principles of finding happiness just by being yourself. Kerby will create an interactive sound installation that will weave in and out of the new Memorizer pieces as well as the new Sword + Fern sculptural line, Water Logic — mobiles, wall hangings, textiles and other jewelry for the home.


Thanks to ADX for the signage — we’re pumped for Content 2012 tomorrow at Ace Hotel Portland. $5 of every ticket will be donated to aid hurricane relief through New York Cares.

Thanks to ADX for the signage — we’re pumped for Content 2012 tomorrow at Ace Hotel Portland. $5 of every ticket will be donated to aid hurricane relief through New York Cares.


Bobby Bonaparte founded LiFT Label on a wing and a prayer in Portland, Oregon — we like anyone who’s a sucker for a leap of faith, with the creative chops to make it work. Bobby’s launching his new collection at this year’s Content at Ace Hotel Portland, presented by smart. Steer yourself our way this Sunday — $5 of all tickets go toward Hurricane Sandy relief efforts.
I started drawing “LiFT” with an upwards arrow for the “i” on my skateboards when I was in the 8th grade. I hoped writing “LiFT” would give me more height or ‘lift’ when I was ollieing. Always seeking to progress, I found an ancient silkscreen that belonged to my aunt in my basement and taught myself how to silkscreen LiFT concepts.
I loved the creative freedom silkscreening gave me, I could put anything I wanted onto a shirt. I soon found that shirts and clothing generally were an incredible means of self expression. I began getting my message out and it seemed to resonate with people.  
After interning at Weiden + Kennedy in Tokyo, I took a job in marketing causing my creativity to lagg. After about a year, I got inspired do a line of tanks for summer with a new mission to connect with the community in a positive way, a commitment to the environment, philanthropy, pushing the envelope of design and manufacturing in the Northwest and maintaing an overall positive perspective.


That summer, the line of tank tops sold out and it became clear that I could make a living doing what I love. I left my salaried job to follow my passion for LiFT. Over a year later, LiFT is carried by rad shops in Portland, San Francisco and San Diego and has been featured in local media and on Portlandia and Girls.
I’m incredibly proud that my new line is sewn entirely in Portland. I pattern out the shirts and pants. The crewnecks with Pendleton pockets are knit here by Columbia Knit.  My chambray button up is made of organic cotton/hemp blend and my collaborative shirts with Foster Huntington and Mao Kudo are printed on organic cotton. It’s my goal to use more sustainable and eco-conscious fabrics moving forward, and it’s important to me to give back to the community by donating time, money and supplies to some amazing non-profits like Ecotrust, Salmon Nation, p:ear, The Listening Archive & Focus the Nation. LiFT is a member of 1% for the Planet, an organization founded by Yvon Chouinard, and we donate at least 1% of our total sales to an non-profit of our choice (Ecotrust).
The company has evolved immensely since it’s conception. I’m happy that “LiFT” and the “STAY LiFTED” mantra have remained a constant in my life. On days when things are especially overwhelming, I take a moment to breathe and remind myself to stay lifted.
And, yes, I am related to Napoleon. My father’s father hired a genealogist to trace back the lineage to Corsica and the man himself. We share a similar nose, stature and drive.
It’s obvious, however, that Bobby has that chip that Napoleon was missing about everyone working together for the greater good. Evolution! It’s a beautiful thing!

Bobby Bonaparte founded LiFT Label on a wing and a prayer in Portland, Oregon — we like anyone who’s a sucker for a leap of faith, with the creative chops to make it work. Bobby’s launching his new collection at this year’s Content at Ace Hotel Portland, presented by smart. Steer yourself our way this Sunday — $5 of all tickets go toward Hurricane Sandy relief efforts.

I started drawing “LiFT” with an upwards arrow for the “i” on my skateboards when I was in the 8th grade. I hoped writing “LiFT” would give me more height or ‘lift’ when I was ollieing. Always seeking to progress, I found an ancient silkscreen that belonged to my aunt in my basement and taught myself how to silkscreen LiFT concepts.

I loved the creative freedom silkscreening gave me, I could put anything I wanted onto a shirt. I soon found that shirts and clothing generally were an incredible means of self expression. I began getting my message out and it seemed to resonate with people.  

After interning at Weiden + Kennedy in Tokyo, I took a job in marketing causing my creativity to lagg. After about a year, I got inspired do a line of tanks for summer with a new mission to connect with the community in a positive way, a commitment to the environment, philanthropy, pushing the envelope of design and manufacturing in the Northwest and maintaing an overall positive perspective.


That summer, the line of tank tops sold out and it became clear that I could make a living doing what I love. I left my salaried job to follow my passion for LiFT. Over a year later, LiFT is carried by rad shops in Portland, San Francisco and San Diego and has been featured in local media and on Portlandia and Girls.

I’m incredibly proud that my new line is sewn entirely in Portland. I pattern out the shirts and pants. The crewnecks with Pendleton pockets are knit here by Columbia Knit.  My chambray button up is made of organic cotton/hemp blend and my collaborative shirts with Foster Huntington and Mao Kudo are printed on organic cotton. It’s my goal to use more sustainable and eco-conscious fabrics moving forward, and it’s important to me to give back to the community by donating time, money and supplies to some amazing non-profits like Ecotrust, Salmon Nation, p:ear, The Listening Archive & Focus the Nation. LiFT is a member of 1% for the Planet, an organization founded by Yvon Chouinard, and we donate at least 1% of our total sales to an non-profit of our choice (Ecotrust).

The company has evolved immensely since it’s conception. I’m happy that “LiFT” and the “STAY LiFTED” mantra have remained a constant in my life. On days when things are especially overwhelming, I take a moment to breathe and remind myself to stay lifted.

And, yes, I am related to Napoleon. My father’s father hired a genealogist to trace back the lineage to Corsica and the man himself. We share a similar nose, stature and drive.

It’s obvious, however, that Bobby has that chip that Napoleon was missing about everyone working together for the greater good. Evolution! It’s a beautiful thing!


INTERVIEW : ROMAN & WILLIAMS

Celebrating a decade of incredible work, Roman and Williams' Robin Standefer and Stephen Alesch signed copies of their new book Roman and Williams Buildings & Interiors : Things We Made with some friends and a gallery of shots in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York last week — you can grab signed copies of this beautiful tome on our shop. We’re old friends with Robin and Stephen, and our studio director, Eric, and interiors maestro Loren worked on the Roman and Williams team when Ace Hotel New York was taking shape. They had a chance to sit down with Stephen and Robin amidst the mayhem to ask about the book, their work together and the subconscious.

Robin and Stephen, you still appear from time to time in Eric and Loren’s dreams. Do you find that creative collaboration spiked with a sobering dose of real business tends to dye the subconscious in this way, and do all the collaborators and team members you’ve had continue to affect your psyche?

Well everything that’s difficult tends to dye the subconscious and work itself into dreams, and we are and always have been difficult. We are proud of that tradition. Easy things are forgettable and have no impact –- no staying power. No dream or haunting qualities ever came from something easy.

The title Things We Made speaks to a sort of portfolio of finished products, however we know how important the process of design is, and how imperfections in that process go into your work, aka “fucking things up.” Will readers get any insight into this rebellious stance?

We hope so! We really put so much work into creating a book that would give insight into our ethos –- where readers could get a sense of us as people, not just our projects. We included hundreds of drawings –- we even drew on the drawings. And the text is a series of conversations, rather than just descriptions.

The book celebrates a “decade of design” — what do you hope the next decade will bring in terms of your studio and practice?

Even more humanistic, careful and unpretentious design. We hope to spread the warmth that the Ace embodies. We’d love to design an airport or a hospital in a way that would move people. The International Style, and what it has bred, and benign contemporary design have made for boring, dreary places that need to me be made more interesting –- interesting for everyone, and not just for architects and designers.

We love your beautiful spot in Montauk — how did the garden do this year? For the green thumbs out there, what’s your favorite vegetable to grow?

It was a hot summer and the garden was absolutely prolific. This year, we built eight-foot tall towers for our tomatoes and we grew eight different varieties. We have been harvesting them well into late October. We never thought they would grow that high – but they did –- they could have grown another few feet even! Our peppers also did well this year because of the heat.

We love growing cabbages, artichokes, and brussell sprouts -– vegetables that take two years to harvest. It is fascinating to watch the process -– how the vegetables grow over one summer, how they retract over the winter and then explode the following spring into super vegetable power.

We’ve also love growing medicinal plants like Angelika, Wormwood and Echinacea, which we like to use. We could go on …

In the act of making things there are many people involved in the process, especially with international projects internationally. In your experience, are Americans still good at “making things”?

Absolutely. American manufacturing almost disappeared — another price of the post-war obsession with cheapening architecture and design. It focused on zero craft and lack of detail. American manufacturing is known for being meaty, strong, simple and good. Things we love. We try to support American craftsmanship as much as we can. It is hard to convince developers and owners to pay more for things made in this country, to pay for things that last longer, but we do the best we can. Whenever we build something for ourselves, this is always the case.

We blessed to call you family and we’re honored to call you friends — excited to see what the next decade brings.

We feel the same about the Ace team. The world is a better place with Ace in it. Thank you. So proud to have had our book party in the Living Room! It’s the project that’s closest to our hearts. Thank you!

Photos from the Billy Farrell Agency


For the third time, local Portland designers reshape the second floor of Ace Hotel Portland for CONTENT 2012, a live installation of goods and the things and people that inspire them into being. Before you start selflessly shopping for others, you can grab something(s) for yourself at the pop-up shop in the Cleaners, get a cocktail and wander through the Sleep-No-More-esque jungle of the second story with smart, the Portland Mercury, Gretchen Jones and a shimmering roster of talented movers and shakers (and makers, as illustrated above). See everything here and come show your support for this new-fangled notion in Portland: fashion. Post-Gore-Tex, almost post-olive drab, we’re working as fast and as furious as possible to empower those nascent threads of fabulousness and form-over-function-ness in the Portland underground.
See last year here and here captured by Jeremy Pelley of OMFGCo.

For the third time, local Portland designers reshape the second floor of Ace Hotel Portland for CONTENT 2012, a live installation of goods and the things and people that inspire them into being. Before you start selflessly shopping for others, you can grab something(s) for yourself at the pop-up shop in the Cleaners, get a cocktail and wander through the Sleep-No-More-esque jungle of the second story with smart, the Portland Mercury, Gretchen Jones and a shimmering roster of talented movers and shakers (and makers, as illustrated above). See everything here and come show your support for this new-fangled notion in Portland: fashion. Post-Gore-Tex, almost post-olive drab, we’re working as fast and as furious as possible to empower those nascent threads of fabulousness and form-over-function-ness in the Portland underground.

See last year here and here captured by Jeremy Pelley of OMFGCo.



The third annual WE MAKE one-night-only collective art show blows through the Cleaners at Ace Hotel Portland like a hell train filled with blazing saddles, smoking guns, young bucks, gnarly design, film buffs, rough riders and wildcats tomorrow night. 
Exhibiting artists this year include Dani Guralnick, Katie McHugh, Sam Tudyk, Chelsea Guidry, Chris Lael Larson, Curtis Pachunka, Brad Simon and Mark Shepherd.
Keg, food and good company are free to all those over 21. See you there. 

The third annual WE MAKE one-night-only collective art show blows through the Cleaners at Ace Hotel Portland like a hell train filled with blazing saddles, smoking guns, young bucks, gnarly design, film buffs, rough riders and wildcats tomorrow night. 

Exhibiting artists this year include Dani Guralnick, Katie McHugh, Sam Tudyk, Chelsea Guidry, Chris Lael Larson, Curtis Pachunka, Brad Simon and Mark Shepherd.

Keg, food and good company are free to all those over 21. See you there. 







Highlights from the International Museum of Television Screen Tests, operated entirely on the Russian information superhighway. We don’t speak Russian (yet) but Google Translate gave us a rough sketch of someone fascinated by the emotions and aesthetic impulses juxtaposed against the sort of pseudoscience of the Universal Electronic Control Table — all flickering onto the screen when most were asleep but some were wide eyed and watching.

Highlights from the International Museum of Television Screen Tests, operated entirely on the Russian information superhighway. We don’t speak Russian (yet) but Google Translate gave us a rough sketch of someone fascinated by the emotions and aesthetic impulses juxtaposed against the sort of pseudoscience of the Universal Electronic Control Table — all flickering onto the screen when most were asleep but some were wide eyed and watching.


By Allison Berg and Lloyd Winter for Steve Sandstrom’s lecture with DesignSpeaks tonight in The Cleaners at Ace Hotel Portland. See the full flyer here.

By Allison Berg and Lloyd Winter for Steve Sandstrom’s lecture with DesignSpeaks tonight in The Cleaners at Ace Hotel Portland. See the full flyer here.


INTERVIEW : EAMES DEMETRIOS

We’re beyond honored to host Eames Demetrios, grandson of Charles and Ray Eames, for Palm Springs Modernism Week at Ace Hotel & Swim Club next week, where he will be holding an Eames Retrospective on February 20 — talking about his grandparents’ work and legend, screening films about their iconic design gestures and discussing the connection with his own explorations and adventures. The retrospective is complimented by a pop-up shop with the A+D Architecture and Design Museum > LA. We have several other events to celebrate Modernism Week, including live mermaids.

We caught up with Eames on the eve of a trip abroad before the retrospective, and he was kind enough to go over some topics both familiar and new. We talked about his epic project Kcymaerxthaere, love, creativity, perseverance and fruitful failure, as well as how his legacy affects his work and process. We wished the conversation could have gone on infinitely, and we’re looking forward to seeing you next week as we keep it going. 

I’m sure that you get asked at every turn about your grandparents. What I was noticing looking through your bio and your work is both that your work is very diverse and it seems like you have an almost spiritual thread through the things that you pursue. I was wondering how your grandparents’ legacy informs the work that you do now, especially this idea of 3-dimensional fiction.

Well I think we are all products of how we grow up and what we are exposed to. And Charles and Ray were definitely a part of my life growing up, and they are pretty amazing people. I think the real place that I find conscious inspiration from them is just this, you know — if you look at Charles right now, they are famous, they are iconic to a lot of different people, which is fantastic. But it wasn’t always that way. There were definitely a lot of struggles for them, especially in the 1940s. One thing I take inspiration from is just this whole idea of really sort of pursing an idea with great passion, an idea you believe in, and trying the hardest you can to pull it off knowing that it won’t happen right away. And I think for me that’s been helpful to know that it has worked for other people, it has happened to people that are a part of my legacy. But I think it’s inspiring to everyone. Because you know when you’re doing something that is really new, you don’t really know whether you are going to succeed or not. And so, one of the nice things I think for them, and certainly for me, was the process — I mean whether Kcymaerxthaere becomes incredibly world famous and successful and all that, it’s been an amazing experience no matter what. I’ve met amazing people, I’ve been to incredible places, and I’ve done some work that meant a lot to me. And so if you can approach things in that way, then whether or not you get the material success, it certainly helps you do more work, and I would be very happy about that — but it also means that you have something that you can feel good about looking back, no matter what. And Charles and Ray, I think, were very pleased with things that things worked out, but I think if they hadn’t, they’d had an amazing time learning about these materials — making the splints, understanding plywood better — and indeed if you look at what they actually did, the final chair that really sort of put them over the top, was not the plywood chair but the plastic chair, which came from their deep engagement with the challenges of molding plywood, even though the final result was plastic. So again, the process really is of value no matter how it turns out.

And you’ve spoken also about — in your Ted Talk and I think in your lectures that you give around the country and around the world — about this idea of “surrendering to your design journey.” Do these ideas relate to that, and what does that mean to you, necessarily?

Well I think that it is related to that. I would agree with that. I think of it particularly in terms of deign itself in the sense that there are so many times you hear about companies, or whatever, where people say they want to be design-driven, but they really have a specific end result in mind. And it’s not that that can’t work out sometimes, and sometimes that end result is really good insight, but very often it’s not really about being willing to surrender yourself to what you learn, and to what results from what you learn. And I think that that’s what I mean by surrendering to the design journey, and being really willing to do that. It doesn’t mean sort of giving up and not pushing back and not trying hard and making sure that ideas aren’t explored carefully and rigorously. But it does mean letting it take you where it goes. Because if you focus on what your real need is, if you keep your focus on that actual need, then certain other things become… they become…. they don’t take center stage when they shouldn’t. So, to use that example of that chair we just talked about, the important thing was making a comfortable and affordable chair. And they had an insight, keep in mind, that the seat and back is one, but there could be something really important there. Now, if the only acceptable outcome was making a mold of plywood, then you could be right, but you could also be destined to failure. But if an acceptable outcome is a successful and affordable chair that combines the seat and back, then success may come. They tried it in metal, they tried it in plywood, and they tried it in plastic — and that’s the one that eventually worked. And then, even with that, over the course of the next 20 years, they were constantly improving it, they were always trying to find a more of a uniform finish to it, and that whole time they had just designed one of the most successful chairs in history and they were still trying to make it better in the 70s.

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A METHOD OF ACTION



From House Industries' typography catalogue.


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