Stonehenge, Wiltshire, England
At the Spring Equinox, day and night are of equal length all over the world. 
The sun’s journey along the horizon — its position as it kissed the giant columnated stones — was used as a seasonal calendar by the monument’s builders five thousand years ago. 
Today at dawn, druids and pagans gather at that ancient site to celebrate the Spring Equinox, and welcome the new season.
Photo by Nick Lomb, 1975.

Stonehenge, Wiltshire, England

At the Spring Equinox, day and night are of equal length all over the world. 

The sun’s journey along the horizon — its position as it kissed the giant columnated stones — was used as a seasonal calendar by the monument’s builders five thousand years ago. 

Today at dawn, druids and pagans gather at that ancient site to celebrate the Spring Equinox, and welcome the new season.

Photo by Nick Lomb, 1975.


About eighty kilometers from Ace Hotel London Shoreditch, at Tiptree, Wilkin and Sons grows strawberries, medlars, quinces, rhubarb, loganberries, damsons and mulberries on their farm in the Essex countryside. It’s a family tradition that stretches back over 300 years. And their coveted conserves are still made simply, from fruit harvested and boiled within hours at Tiptree, without preservatives or added colors. This year, an unusually bountiful autumn means their classic Little Scarlet jam — made from a tiny, outlandishly savory variety of strawberry brought from North America by C.J. Wilkin in the early 1900s and only grown today at Tiptree — will abound. In this season of plenty, so will the acorns in the New Forest, just as commoner pigs begin to remember pannage, and the chestnuts ready-for-roasting in Greenwich Park. After a summer that started slow then settled in, Britain’s bumper harvest bodes well for teatimes, farmers and people who wait for what the soil will bring.

About eighty kilometers from Ace Hotel London Shoreditch, at Tiptree, Wilkin and Sons grows strawberries, medlars, quinces, rhubarb, loganberries, damsons and mulberries on their farm in the Essex countryside. It’s a family tradition that stretches back over 300 years. And their coveted conserves are still made simply, from fruit harvested and boiled within hours at Tiptree, without preservatives or added colors. This year, an unusually bountiful autumn means their classic Little Scarlet jam — made from a tiny, outlandishly savory variety of strawberry brought from North America by C.J. Wilkin in the early 1900s and only grown today at Tiptree — will abound. In this season of plenty, so will the acorns in the New Forest, just as commoner pigs begin to remember pannage, and the chestnuts ready-for-roasting in Greenwich Park. After a summer that started slow then settled in, Britain’s bumper harvest bodes well for teatimes, farmers and people who wait for what the soil will bring.


After all a cup is really only a small plate with its collar up.

A Technicolor study of English pottery, the skill of the potter and the modern mechanized factories of the legendary Wedgwood, hosted by British Council Film.


Photographer Bob Mazzer shot the Tube throughout the 20th century, capturing, mid-career, these iconic 70s and 80s snapshots in the London Underground of the universal intersection of how awesome it is to be young and how shitty it is to be young.

Photographer Bob Mazzer shot the Tube throughout the 20th century, capturing, mid-career, these iconic 70s and 80s snapshots in the London Underground of the universal intersection of how awesome it is to be young and how shitty it is to be young.


Happy birthday, Aldous.

Happy birthday, Aldous.


Cries of victory at this year’s Wimbledon — America’s Serena Williams, Puerto Rico’s Monica Puig and Scotland’s Andrew Barron Murray.



Photos by Getty, The Independent and The Irish Mirror.

Cries of victory at this year’s Wimbledon — America’s Serena Williams, Puerto Rico’s Monica Puig and Scotland’s Andrew Barron Murray.

Wimbledon

Photos by GettyThe Independent and The Irish Mirror.


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