NPR Music hosted 8 Million Stories: Hip Hop in 1993 at Ace Hotel New York with us in Liberty Hall last night. Ali Shaheed Muhammad of A Tribe Called Quest, Uncle Ralph, Prince Paul, Mike Dean, Stretch, Faith and NPR’s own Frannie Kelley and Saidah Blount (re)presented and we all made beautiful music together.

NPR Music hosted 8 Million Stories: Hip Hop in 1993 at Ace Hotel New York with us in Liberty Hall last night. Ali Shaheed Muhammad of A Tribe Called Quest, Uncle Ralph, Prince Paul, Mike Dean, Stretch, Faith and NPR’s own Frannie Kelley and Saidah Blount (re)presented and we all made beautiful music together.


This past April, NPR Music collaborated with us at Ace Hotel & Swim Club during Coachella for two evenings taking turns at the decks with special guests The Embassy and a karaoke fight night. This month, they’re curating a well-read and winsome roster of selectors every Monday for Lobby Nights at Ace New York. So far, they’ve brought cohosts from shows like Microphone Check and Deceptive Cadence to play psych jams, hip-hop and far-fetched, deeply-researched noises in the lobby. Tonight, John, Eleanor and Josh of Ask Me Another are spinning what they humbly describe as “mega jams.”
Come by if you’re in the neighborhood for this penultimate friend of your brain. For the final evening next Monday, Microphone Check’s Ali and Frannie are back on the decks with NPR Music’s Events doyenne Saidah Blount. 

This past April, NPR Music collaborated with us at Ace Hotel & Swim Club during Coachella for two evenings taking turns at the decks with special guests The Embassy and a karaoke fight night. This month, they’re curating a well-read and winsome roster of selectors every Monday for Lobby Nights at Ace New York. So far, they’ve brought cohosts from shows like Microphone Check and Deceptive Cadence to play psych jams, hip-hop and far-fetched, deeply-researched noises in the lobby. Tonight, John, Eleanor and Josh of Ask Me Another are spinning what they humbly describe as “mega jams.”

Come by if you’re in the neighborhood for this penultimate friend of your brain. For the final evening next Monday, Microphone Check’s Ali and Frannie are back on the decks with NPR Music’s Events doyenne Saidah Blount. 


Giuseppe Penone began his creative process in 1968 in the Garessio forest of Italy, near where he was born. He is the younger member of the Italian movement “Arte Povera.” With work that seeks to establish contact between humans and nature, his new sculptures in Madison Square Park, “Ideas of Stone (Idee di Pietra)” are balm for the surreality of living and working in one of the globes most magical but challenging cities. Penone speaks this afternoon at Ace Hotel New York — if you can’t catch it, you can see the installation through February, 2014. Learn more about him at Madison Square Art Conservancy.

Giuseppe Penone began his creative process in 1968 in the Garessio forest of Italy, near where he was born. He is the younger member of the Italian movement “Arte Povera.” With work that seeks to establish contact between humans and nature, his new sculptures in Madison Square Park, “Ideas of Stone (Idee di Pietra)” are balm for the surreality of living and working in one of the globes most magical but challenging cities. Penone speaks this afternoon at Ace Hotel New York — if you can’t catch it, you can see the installation through February, 2014. Learn more about him at Madison Square Art Conservancy.


 By day, Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham run Tokyo’s Klein-Dytham Architecture — turning inspiration sparked from the convergence of their myriad global influences (she was born in Italy to German parents, schooled in France, and educated in Britain, where the pair met before moving east in 1988) into building-sized testaments to their creative prowess. They just so happen to have designed our new happy place in Tokyo, Daikanyama T-Site, pictured here. By night, Astrid and Mark foster the global movement known as Pecha Kucha. This isn’t the duo’s first stroke of brilliance — Klein-Dytham designs some of the prettiest buildings we’ve seen anywhere, globally inspired but deeply rooted in the minimalist ethos and diverse natural surroundings of life in Japan. They also run an event space, SuperDeluxe, where they invite young designers to think, drink, collaborate, make noise, eat food, share big ideas, and network their little hearts out — and where, way back in 2003, Pecha Kucha was born.
In the hands of the 99% of us for whom public speaking isn’t a life calling, having to present an idea — no matter how jaw-droppingly awesome it actually is — to a room full of people is a particular kind of hell. And watching someone else bury their own great idea under rambling departures from the point and yawn-inducing over-explanations is just as bad — unless you’re hard-pressed for a nap, probably worse. But Klein and Dytham hit the sweet spot, challenging presenters to distill a message into 20 slides, showing each for 20 seconds. In six minutes and forty seconds, you can really only do so much damage — and as it turns out, it’s led to some of the most powerful and profoundly moving storytelling sessions we’ve had the pleasure of witnessing. Tonight, The Cleaners acts as the Portland headquarters of Pecha Kucha Global Night, alongside about 100 other cities hosting similar events. Starting at 7pm, it’s free and open to the public — true to spirit.

By day, Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham run Tokyo’s Klein-Dytham Architecture — turning inspiration sparked from the convergence of their myriad global influences (she was born in Italy to German parents, schooled in France, and educated in Britain, where the pair met before moving east in 1988) into building-sized testaments to their creative prowess. They just so happen to have designed our new happy place in Tokyo, Daikanyama T-Site, pictured here. By night, Astrid and Mark foster the global movement known as Pecha Kucha. This isn’t the duo’s first stroke of brilliance — Klein-Dytham designs some of the prettiest buildings we’ve seen anywhere, globally inspired but deeply rooted in the minimalist ethos and diverse natural surroundings of life in Japan. They also run an event space, SuperDeluxe, where they invite young designers to think, drink, collaborate, make noise, eat food, share big ideas, and network their little hearts out — and where, way back in 2003, Pecha Kucha was born.

In the hands of the 99% of us for whom public speaking isn’t a life calling, having to present an idea — no matter how jaw-droppingly awesome it actually is — to a room full of people is a particular kind of hell. And watching someone else bury their own great idea under rambling departures from the point and yawn-inducing over-explanations is just as bad — unless you’re hard-pressed for a nap, probably worse. But Klein and Dytham hit the sweet spot, challenging presenters to distill a message into 20 slides, showing each for 20 seconds. In six minutes and forty seconds, you can really only do so much damage — and as it turns out, it’s led to some of the most powerful and profoundly moving storytelling sessions we’ve had the pleasure of witnessing. Tonight, The Cleaners acts as the Portland headquarters of Pecha Kucha Global Night, alongside about 100 other cities hosting similar events. Starting at 7pm, it’s free and open to the public — true to spirit.


One of Giuseppe Penone's sculptures rolling in to Madison Square Park this morning in advance of his installation through early 2014. Watch here for more from Mr. Penone and the Mad. Sq. Pk. Conservancy.

One of Giuseppe Penone's sculptures rolling in to Madison Square Park this morning in advance of his installation through early 2014. Watch here for more from Mr. Penone and the Mad. Sq. Pk. Conservancy.






Santa Fe rare book shop Photo-Eye is among dozens of jewels gathering at this weekend’s Art Book Fair at PS1 in Queens. Their books light a flame of book greed in our hearts so strong it hurts. This specimen from their shelves, Shuji Terayama’s Photothèque imaginaire, was designed and handbound in Tokyo, 1975, and belly-bound in an original printed obi.
"Playwright, poet, photographer, filmmaker and all-around provacateur Shuji Terayama is one of the most important figures in the Japanese counter-culture of the sixties and seventies. He produced over 200 literary works and over 20 shorts and full-length films as well as untold works of theater with Tenjo Sajiki and others. Like his films, the photomontages in Photothèque imaginaire… are self-consciously experimental, often surreal, and frequently confounding. And, like the Parisian Surrealists of the 1920s and 30s, he was a great fan of Lautréamont’s Les Chants de Maldoror. He vehemently opposed the protection of the status quo and attacked the righteousness of the Japanese family system and any vestiges of nationalism."
Suzanne Feld, Between Two Worlds: Selected Postwar Japanese Films, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Santa Fe rare book shop Photo-Eye is among dozens of jewels gathering at this weekend’s Art Book Fair at PS1 in Queens. Their books light a flame of book greed in our hearts so strong it hurts. This specimen from their shelves, Shuji Terayama’s Photothèque imaginaire, was designed and handbound in Tokyo, 1975, and belly-bound in an original printed obi.

"Playwright, poet, photographer, filmmaker and all-around provacateur Shuji Terayama is one of the most important figures in the Japanese counter-culture of the sixties and seventies. He produced over 200 literary works and over 20 shorts and full-length films as well as untold works of theater with Tenjo Sajiki and others. Like his films, the photomontages in Photothèque imaginaire… are self-consciously experimental, often surreal, and frequently confounding. And, like the Parisian Surrealists of the 1920s and 30s, he was a great fan of Lautréamont’s Les Chants de Maldoror. He vehemently opposed the protection of the status quo and attacked the righteousness of the Japanese family system and any vestiges of nationalism."

Suzanne Feld, Between Two Worlds: Selected Postwar Japanese Films, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art


Everyone has a hotel story. The hotel is a universal and identifiable symbol with extraordinary purpose. A space that combines the private and public realms, it is intimately connected to a rich history of social and cultural change. Grand Hotel: Redesigning Modern Life, up for its last day today at the Vancouver Art Gallery, charts the evolution of the hotel from an isolated and utilitarian structure to a cultural phenomenon that figures prominently around the world, elucidating its prominence in the public consciousness and reflecting the nature of the hotel itself: engaging, innovative, provocative, ephemeral, a laboratory of modern life. We’ve hung a shingle there — come see us if you’re in town.


TBA INTERVIEW : KATHLEEN HANNA of THE JULIE RUIN
Kathleen Hanna is the fairy godmother of punk feminism. When she started Bikini Kill in the 90s she started a unquenchable fire in every girl’s heart that burned through the brush to a clear place where girls could see each other and themselves more clearly. How other people saw them — who gives a shit. Kathleen is now back on stages and on tour with the second incarnation of her group The Julie Ruin, and they’re bringing their irreverent and joyful noise to the opening ceremony for PICA’s TBA Festival this Thursday. Here, an excerpt from NPR Music's Jacki Lyden interview with the woman in question.

Girls like us like cotton candy, plastic handbags, alcohol. Girls like us sometimes ignore people on the street, even other people that we know. Girls like us sneak breaks at Wendy’s and girls like us invented jazz. Girls like us have no foundations, creation myths are so passé. Girls like us.

Tell me a little bit about how this song came to be. What’s going on here?
You tell me. The lyrics are really kind of random. It’s like, girls like us eat salt for breakfast, girls like us stand back to back. They’re kind of an anthem for the people who there is no anthem for. You know, it’s meant to be kind of a tongue-in-cheek thing of like, we’re all different. I thought that song was a really playful way to say there is no girl like us. You know what I mean? There’s just as many different kinds of feminism as there are women in the world.
You were forced to take a long time out; this is your first album in nine years. People were wondering what had happened. And recently, it came to light that you were suffering very seriously from an undiagnosed illness. Would you tell me more about that?
Yeah, I have late-stage Lyme disease. And I still, you know, have good days, bad days, good weeks, bad weeks. And I’m still in long-term treatment. It’s been a tough nine years. And I didn’t think that I would ever be performing again. And that was a very bitter pill to swallow along with the other 84 pills I take every day, ha.
Are you on good terms with the woman who started Bikini Kill?
I think I am now. I’ve kind of made peace with the mistakes that I’ve made and also feeling proud of what I’ve made. I think that people who are involved in community activism, it’s like, don’t stand out. We’re all equal, you know, especially if you come from a punk rock background that’s anti-hierarchy. And I always had this thing of, like, don’t be a leader. And I think that fed into me not being able to say: Hey, wait. That was really cool what I did.
I had to, you know, downplay the interesting things that I had made, kind of even to myself. And I’m still as pissed off as ever before. I think I’m just a little bit more directed. I have a better direction for my anger. It’s less kind of loosey-goosey all over the place. And I’m more apt to look at a larger world view than just, you know, what’s going on inside my apartment building. And now I think both the 21-year-old and the 41-year-old are pretty happy with each other…

TBA INTERVIEW : KATHLEEN HANNA of THE JULIE RUIN

Kathleen Hanna is the fairy godmother of punk feminism. When she started Bikini Kill in the 90s she started a unquenchable fire in every girl’s heart that burned through the brush to a clear place where girls could see each other and themselves more clearly. How other people saw them — who gives a shit. Kathleen is now back on stages and on tour with the second incarnation of her group The Julie Ruin, and they’re bringing their irreverent and joyful noise to the opening ceremony for PICA’s TBA Festival this Thursday. Here, an excerpt from NPR Music's Jacki Lyden interview with the woman in question.

Girls like us like cotton candy, plastic handbags, alcohol. Girls like us sometimes ignore people on the street, even other people that we know. Girls like us sneak breaks at Wendy’s and girls like us invented jazz. Girls like us have no foundations, creation myths are so passé. Girls like us.

Tell me a little bit about how this song came to be. What’s going on here?

You tell me. The lyrics are really kind of random. It’s like, girls like us eat salt for breakfast, girls like us stand back to back. They’re kind of an anthem for the people who there is no anthem for. You know, it’s meant to be kind of a tongue-in-cheek thing of like, we’re all different. I thought that song was a really playful way to say there is no girl like us. You know what I mean? There’s just as many different kinds of feminism as there are women in the world.

You were forced to take a long time out; this is your first album in nine years. People were wondering what had happened. And recently, it came to light that you were suffering very seriously from an undiagnosed illness. Would you tell me more about that?

Yeah, I have late-stage Lyme disease. And I still, you know, have good days, bad days, good weeks, bad weeks. And I’m still in long-term treatment. It’s been a tough nine years. And I didn’t think that I would ever be performing again. And that was a very bitter pill to swallow along with the other 84 pills I take every day, ha.

Are you on good terms with the woman who started Bikini Kill?

I think I am now. I’ve kind of made peace with the mistakes that I’ve made and also feeling proud of what I’ve made. I think that people who are involved in community activism, it’s like, don’t stand out. We’re all equal, you know, especially if you come from a punk rock background that’s anti-hierarchy. And I always had this thing of, like, don’t be a leader. And I think that fed into me not being able to say: Hey, wait. That was really cool what I did.

I had to, you know, downplay the interesting things that I had made, kind of even to myself. And I’m still as pissed off as ever before. I think I’m just a little bit more directed. I have a better direction for my anger. It’s less kind of loosey-goosey all over the place. And I’m more apt to look at a larger world view than just, you know, what’s going on inside my apartment building. And now I think both the 21-year-old and the 41-year-old are pretty happy with each other…


I’VE GOT A HOLE IN MY SOUL : BEYONDADOUBT
NICK WATERHOUSE & THE TURN-KEYS : SOME PLACE

Not sure how, but one day I came across this video & was in shock that there was an early 60’s RnB record that sounded like this that I had never heard! The baritone sax had me hooked. After that a hot-handed fever of needing a record I had never seen came over me, I was so confused when this search lead me to a SoundCloud (?!) page. Turned out that this was not a 60’s production but a modern record made by someone obsessed with the same lost sound that I am. I sent a message & he sent me the 45 & a musical friendship began.

At a concert Nick told the audience that I was the first person outside of SF to ever contact him about his music. That must seem so long ago to a man that is now internationally known as a revivalist and classic fashion icon with half a dozen releases under his belt.

Thursday we welcome the singer, songwriter and record producer Nick Waterhouse to Portland. Though it is rumored that Nick started out as a 45s DJ, he is better known as a guitarist and singer of a sound rooted in early 60’s rhythm & blues, jazz and soul. Thursday night he’ll be DJing his fabled 45rpm record collection that inspired his music career, at I’ve Got a Hole in My Soul with me at Holocene. ♥

This is the latest chapter in our new rare vinyl series with Beyondadoubt, a Portland-based producer, beatmaker, DJ and collector.


MusicFest NW rolls around every year when the leaves start to turn. This year, it brings Larry Crane and Jackpot! Recording to the mezzanine at Ace Hotel Portland for a series of live sessions, September 6 and 7 from noon to 4pm.
Lay down some tracks of your own in the recording area on the mezzanine of the hotel, or lurk and listen downstairs while bands record live tracks against the hustle and bustle of the hotel and coffee shop downstairs. Equipment and sound engineering provided by Jackpot!, music provided by whoever emails larry@tapeop.com to set up a recording time. Performances include Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy (Will Oldham of Palace Music), Hutch of The Thermals and Red Fang.

MusicFest NW rolls around every year when the leaves start to turn. This year, it brings Larry Crane and Jackpot! Recording to the mezzanine at Ace Hotel Portland for a series of live sessions, September 6 and 7 from noon to 4pm.

Lay down some tracks of your own in the recording area on the mezzanine of the hotel, or lurk and listen downstairs while bands record live tracks against the hustle and bustle of the hotel and coffee shop downstairs. Equipment and sound engineering provided by Jackpot!, music provided by whoever emails larry@tapeop.com to set up a recording time. Performances include Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy (Will Oldham of Palace Music), Hutch of The Thermals and Red Fang.


Powered by Tumblr