Zavrazhye, Russia

On this day in 1932, the world was given one of its most gifted visionaries, the filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky whose recurring themes of dream, memory, childhood, running water accompanied by fire, indoors rain and hazy reflections help us see the world from an indelible new strange and soft angle. His films give breath to dreams of unmistakable beauty. 

Tarkovsky loved the Polaroid camera and always carried one with him. These are a selection of his photos.


Casco Viejo, Panama
Panama City’s sixth annual MACROFEST — a grand, multidisciplinary celebration of contemporary culture held in the city’s historical district — is now in full swing in Casco Viejo.
We’re happy to be lending a hand with this year’s festival, whose core initiative engages young artists locally and around the world. We’ll be exhibiting Panamanian artists Jonathan Harker & Donna Conlon's video piece Domino Effect — a portrait of present day Casco Antiguo, in which the camera tracks a succession of antique colonial era bricks in a chain reaction through the neighborhood’s streets. The piece will be projected tonight at 7pm across the surface of the Iglesia La Merced in front of American Trade Hotel.
We are also hosting a photo exhibition through March 15 with Chilean street style photographer Majo Arévalo, whose Viste La Calle blog keeps pulse with the inspired looks of modern South America.

Casco Viejo, Panama

Panama City’s sixth annual MACROFEST — a grand, multidisciplinary celebration of contemporary culture held in the city’s historical district — is now in full swing in Casco Viejo.

We’re happy to be lending a hand with this year’s festival, whose core initiative engages young artists locally and around the world. We’ll be exhibiting Panamanian artists Jonathan Harker & Donna Conlon's video piece Domino Effect — a portrait of present day Casco Antiguo, in which the camera tracks a succession of antique colonial era bricks in a chain reaction through the neighborhood’s streets. The piece will be projected tonight at 7pm across the surface of the Iglesia La Merced in front of American Trade Hotel.

We are also hosting a photo exhibition through March 15 with Chilean street style photographer Majo Arévalo, whose Viste La Calle blog keeps pulse with the inspired looks of modern South America.


London, UK
A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.
How do you see yourself?
I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)
How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.
What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…
What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.
A secret power you would like to have?
              
To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…
All photos by Cheryl Dunn.

London, UK

A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.

How do you see yourself?

I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)

How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.

What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…

What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.

A secret power you would like to have?

              

To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…

All photos by Cheryl Dunn.


London’s Rio Cinema is an institution of boozy, Art Deco and inexpensive cinema-going. But it’s on its last leg, and needs your help. Viva la Sunday matinee.

London’s Rio Cinema is an institution of boozy, Art Deco and inexpensive cinema-going. But it’s on its last leg, and needs your help. Viva la Sunday matinee.


With the dough it takes to make one of the rehashed gazillion dollar shoot ‘em ups that flopped at the box office this summer (it was nicer outside anyway), Gregg Araki could theoretically make Three Bewildered People In The Night several thousand times, even if you adjust for 1987 money. As it turns out once was enough. His no-budget portrait of three West Village artists was as refreshingly open in its fluid sexuality as claustrophobically confined by its murky lighting and landscapes. The film slow-launched Araki to a pioneer role in the New Queer Cinema. And though his films probably cost more now than a single sequence of a muscle car exploding in flames, he still keeps it weird and candidly queer. The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) is screening a retrospective of Araki’s career that kicks off [next] Thursday and Friday, respectively, with The Living End and Three Bewildered People In The Night. On September 28, Araki his bad self will lead an intimate master class. We’ll be partnering with MAD to curate some music and other happenings at Ace Hotel New York soon. More on that later. 

With the dough it takes to make one of the rehashed gazillion dollar shoot ‘em ups that flopped at the box office this summer (it was nicer outside anyway), Gregg Araki could theoretically make Three Bewildered People In The Night several thousand times, even if you adjust for 1987 money. As it turns out once was enough. His no-budget portrait of three West Village artists was as refreshingly open in its fluid sexuality as claustrophobically confined by its murky lighting and landscapes. The film slow-launched Araki to a pioneer role in the New Queer Cinema. And though his films probably cost more now than a single sequence of a muscle car exploding in flames, he still keeps it weird and candidly queer. The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) is screening a retrospective of Araki’s career that kicks off [next] Thursday and Friday, respectively, with The Living End and Three Bewildered People In The Night. On September 28, Araki his bad self will lead an intimate master class. We’ll be partnering with MAD to curate some music and other happenings at Ace Hotel New York soon. More on that later. 


Interior. Leather Bar. opens Saturday at the Film Society of Lincoln Center as part of NewFest: The NYC LGBT Film Festival. The new film by James Franco and Travis Mathews is inspired by the ‘lost’ (or legendary) 40 minutes of the infamous 1980 leather exploitation film Cruising, starring Al Pacino, a film that captures what the New York Times today called the “eroticized outlaw mystique” of an era in queer culture.

Interior. Leather Bar. opens Saturday at the Film Society of Lincoln Center as part of NewFest: The NYC LGBT Film Festival. The new film by James Franco and Travis Mathews is inspired by the ‘lost’ (or legendary) 40 minutes of the infamous 1980 leather exploitation film Cruising, starring Al Pacino, a film that captures what the New York Times today called the “eroticized outlaw mystique” of an era in queer culture.


At the end of Galata Bridge…
…that’s where the Red Star Hotel is
It bears no comparison…
…to our splendid galactic corridors…
…all a-glitter with luxury and light
From Jean Luc Godard’s Alphaville, 1965

At the end of Galata Bridge…

…that’s where the Red Star Hotel is

It bears no comparison…

…to our splendid galactic corridors…

…all a-glitter with luxury and light

From Jean Luc Godard’s Alphaville, 1965


After all a cup is really only a small plate with its collar up.

A Technicolor study of English pottery, the skill of the potter and the modern mechanized factories of the legendary Wedgwood, hosted by British Council Film.


Works championed by the Naked Eye Cinema group in 1980s New York City play tonight at the New Museum free of charge. As described by The New York Film Makers’ Co-Op, the Naked Eye group (now living on as Allied Productions) “was the only venue of its era that consistently showed film and video by women, gay men, lesbians and novice makers on the margins of culture. A center of the newest and most challenging spheres in contemporary music, performance and visual art, the spirit of Naked Eye Cinema lives in new and ‘used’ videos that belie genre classification…Using the Lower East Side art center ABC No Rio as home base, they showed Super 8, 16mm and video in galleries, theaters, lofts, salons, nightclubs, street corners — wherever you could fit a projector – all over Manhattan, the States…the world.”

Works championed by the Naked Eye Cinema group in 1980s New York City play tonight at the New Museum free of charge. As described by The New York Film Makers’ Co-Op, the Naked Eye group (now living on as Allied Productions) “was the only venue of its era that consistently showed film and video by women, gay men, lesbians and novice makers on the margins of culture. A center of the newest and most challenging spheres in contemporary music, performance and visual art, the spirit of Naked Eye Cinema lives in new and ‘used’ videos that belie genre classification…Using the Lower East Side art center ABC No Rio as home base, they showed Super 8, 16mm and video in galleries, theaters, lofts, salons, nightclubs, street corners — wherever you could fit a projector – all over Manhattan, the States…the world.”


Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.

Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.


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