Sir New York show at the Out Hotel — batter up.

Sir New York show at the Out Hotel — batter up.


INTERVIEW : TAVI GEVINSON

Tavi Gevinson is starting to become just Tavi — like Cher. She could be a Bob and would still be THE Bob. She’s just insanely special, and we were head over heels honored to collaborate again with Tavi and her team at Rookie for Fashion Week this year to celebrate Rookie’s one year anniversary and the launch of their new book, Rookie Yearbook One, at Ace Hotel New York. Bob took some time out of her creative hurricane to talk to us about what Rookie means to her, trying to relax and what the future holds.

You’re living an unconventional life for a teenager — absorbing and experiencing stuff way beyond the confines of what high school can offer. If you were to invent a Rookie school, what would the curriculum be like? How do you think elements of that could be imbued into normal, every day high schools to change the lives of teenage girls, boys and everyone else?

I’m not comfortable even theorizing about How to Change the Schools of America, but Freaks and Geeks and Daniel Clowes’ work each blessed me with a sense of appreciation for human misery, and that outlook certainly changed what I get out of my school experience. Also, one of my teachers once told a story about his dad taking him shopping at Wal-Mart when everyone else in his school wore Ralph Lauren polos. He was horrified by the prospect of someone from his school seeing him there and him feeling embarrassed, but realized that in order for one of his peers to see him at Wal-Mart, they, too, would have to be at Wal-Mart. High school is terrible but learning is good and people are interesting and we’re all in Wal-Mart together.

Rookie has had a couple of articles that mention transgender, gay, lesbian and queer folks, but not a huge amount of content. The magazine is “for teenage girls” — does this ever feel clunky or ill-fitting when you think about reaching a trans, queer or gender variant audience of young people?

We’re always looking to expand the definitions of what girls can do and be, and looking for readers to share their stories through Rookie as well, so while our first year has meant a lot of figuring out who our audience is and what they would like to see from us, it doesn’t feel clunky at all to welcome all kinds of people into Rookie. Supporting girls also means sometimes questioning what it means to be a girl (or a boy), and we’ll keep on doing that.

How do you make time to daydream, create, space out and do nothing/everything with such an insane schedule? A lot of people don’t have to learn that skill until they’re much older, and most of us still struggle to figure it out, present company included. Do you think “success” ever takes a toll on your creative life or your psyche?

For each day I have different time units, like Hugh Grant in About a Boy: school, Rookie, friends, relaxing, my own creative projects, etc. I usually have to sacrifice at least one of these units on a regular school day. I’ve learned that I prefer the stress of trying to do everything I want, to the stress of wondering if I should do everything I want. I’ve also learned that it’s better to just do things all the time than sit around and think about how much shit I have to do and what to do next.

I asked S.E. Hinton a similar question when I interviewed her for Lula, not about her schedule specifically, but about the downsides of success in general. She said simply that success didn’t feel like as big a burden as no success would feel. My life is very stressful, but a lot of it comes from expectations I have for myself. I don’t feel like I got talked into anything or signed up for something I didn’t know I couldn’t handle. The fact that I even get to do all this and people will look at it is an extreme privilege, so it’s stressful, but I’m not complaining. I don’t really feel like my “success” takes a toll on my creative life or my psyche because all the projects I do that technically make me successful are my creative life and psyche — they’re creative outlets and places for me to express myself.

Tell us about some of your hopes and dreams for Rookie in year two.

I always want us to be bigger and better and all of that stuff, but it’s too scary to delve into the details right now.

Photograph of Tavi by Emily Berl for The New York Times


A stack of vintage fabrics at Andrea Aranow's archives — Andrea has been collecting fabrics all over the world for six decades, providing inspiration to every fashion house on god's green earth, and building a truly stunning wealth of textiles. We have spent many hours softly patting stacks of perfectly folded fabric squares and gazing into the eyes of vintage Japanese futon fabric swatches as their hues shifted almost imperceptibly in the thin light allowed into Andrea's studio. Stay tuned for an interview with Andrea about her life, the fashion world and her very beautiful obsession, coming soon.

A stack of vintage fabrics at Andrea Aranow's archives — Andrea has been collecting fabrics all over the world for six decades, providing inspiration to every fashion house on god's green earth, and building a truly stunning wealth of textiles. We have spent many hours softly patting stacks of perfectly folded fabric squares and gazing into the eyes of vintage Japanese futon fabric swatches as their hues shifted almost imperceptibly in the thin light allowed into Andrea's studio. Stay tuned for an interview with Andrea about her life, the fashion world and her very beautiful obsession, coming soon.


Let bitchface reign supreme tonight.


Bill Cunningham shines on at the SUNO show at Milk Studios in New York last night.

Bill Cunningham shines on at the SUNO show at Milk Studios in New York last night.


Spike Jonze and Carol and Humberto’s moms joined us in the lobby for a special Opening Ceremony Q&A yesterday at Ace New York. Humberto and Carol answered the inquiries of fashion and design students with stories about building what has become an indisputable icon in the fashion world by sharing what they discover and feeding their friendships all over the globe with enthusiasm and fierce love — “Our store is here for people to discover things, and we never want to lose that.”




The evening gave way to a bacchanalia of K-Pop makeovers, draconian up-do’s, 42Below Vodka-induced karaoke and delicious Korean desserts and street food, as well as a book signing for OC’s commemorative ten year anniversary tome.





Keep an eye out here as our Fashion Week adventures continue to unfold.

Spike Jonze and Carol and Humberto’s moms joined us in the lobby for a special Opening Ceremony Q&A yesterday at Ace New York. Humberto and Carol answered the inquiries of fashion and design students with stories about building what has become an indisputable icon in the fashion world by sharing what they discover and feeding their friendships all over the globe with enthusiasm and fierce love — “Our store is here for people to discover things, and we never want to lose that.”

The evening gave way to a bacchanalia of K-Pop makeovers, draconian up-do’s, 42Below Vodka-induced karaoke and delicious Korean desserts and street food, as well as a book signing for OC’s commemorative ten year anniversary tome.

Keep an eye out here as our Fashion Week adventures continue to unfold.


Today at a Q&A for fashion and design students with Opening Ceremony founders Carol and Humberto and filmmaker Spike Jonze in the Ace New York lobby, we learned that Carol and Humberto first forged their lifelong friendship on their way to a Weird Al Yankovich concert — that is, Carol caved after a strong campaign from Humberto convinced her it would be great. For ten years, they’ve been doing the same for us — finding cool shit, loving it hard and sharing it with the world, no matter how weird or off-beat it may at first appear (and remain). They are both human fountains of joy and openness and being their friend and neighbor is beyond inspiring.

We’re very honored to host the Opening Ceremony team again tonight in the lobby for Fashion’s Night Out in honor of a full decade of effervescent brilliance and beauty from Carol, Humberto and their best friends, as they sign their new book and oversee a few hours of K-Pop-inspired chaos including makeovers, karaoke hosted by Solange Knowles and high concept manicures to celebrate their new country of the year. See you tonight.


Rest in peace, Anna Piaggi.

Photo by Carla Coulson

Rest in peace, Anna Piaggi.


Photo by Carla Coulson


gqfashion:

Your Morning Shot: Keith Haring
“Nothing is important… so everything is important.”

gqfashion:

Your Morning Shot: Keith Haring

“Nothing is important… so everything is important.”

Cite Arrow via genericsurplus

For February Fashion Week 2012, Ace Hotel New York will partner with Martin Greenfield Clothiers to present a pop-up tailoring studio in The Boardroom of Ace where visitors, guests and friends can be fitted for bespoke suits and garments by tailors from Martin Greenfield, including the master tailor, Mr. Greenfield himself. Martin Greenfield is the standard setter in the fashion world for designers and clients with an appreciation for the classic art of tailoring. The hand-tailored garments, painstakingly measured, cut and stitched by hand at his East Williamsburg, Brooklyn shop, are sought after by designers, pop stars, politicians and film directors who seek sartorial perfection.

Mr. Greenfield has been making fine hand-tailored suits for well over 60 years. Born in Czechoslovakia, his first experience stitching garments was as a young prisoner at Auschwitz. He survived, and with the help of his uncle emigrated to Brooklyn and got a job in the factory of GGG Clothing. Thirty years later, he bought the factory from his employer. He kept the sewing machines humming through the 1977 black-out and riots, and through the lean times and break-ins of the following decades, while many factories shut their doors. Today, over 130 craftspersons work the tables in the loft-style factory of Greenfield Clothiers, still using the time-honored techniques Mr. Greenfield learned as an apprentice. They still use antique machines and irons no longer in production, still hand-sew 50 stitches for every button hole. A finished suit still takes 108 operations by 80 or more artisans and six weeks to complete.

Martin Greenfield’s reputation for attention to detail and outstanding custom made suits has earned him an iconic status in the fashion world — GQ Magazine has called him “America’s greatest living tailor.” His work has been commissioned by designers at Rag & Bone, Freeman’s Sporting Club, Band of Outsiders, Donna Karan and more. Recently, his shop hand-tailored the 1920’s-era garments for the HBO series, Boardwalk Empire. His client list includes the likes of Martin Scorsese, Bill Clinton, Paul Newman, Michael Jackson and Patrick Ewing. We are inspired by Martin Greenfield’s dedication to his craft and honored to bring a true legend from Brooklyn’s heritage of artisanal fashion to Ace.

Exclusively for Fashion Week at Ace Hotel New York, tailors from Greenfield Clothiers, including Martin Greenfield himself, will conduct personal fittings in The Boardroom, February 10-12, by appointment only. Greenfield tailors will have extensive fabric books and a wide range of linings to choose from. Whiskey, beers, coffee and comestibles provided by our friends at The Breslin, Stumptown and Heineken. An RSVP is required to schedule a fitting — please do so at acehotel.com/greenfield, where you can also find information about payment and fittings.

Heineken and Martin Greenfield will be awarding a complimentary fitting and suit to one lucky winner. The contestant will be fitted for a made-to-measure suit in The Boardroom at Ace Hotel New York during February Fashion Week 2012. Open to New York residents 21 and over. To enter, send your name and birthdate here — the winner will be notified by email.

Film by Matt Jay


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