Passwords, watchwords, secrets, The Fine Print — access to ideas more than might and more than money is the origin of power, as the saying goes-ish. Sometimes it’s almost batfuck loco how much power information contains. Kierkegaard: People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for freedom of thought, which they seldom use. 
The ability to think what you want, to share ideas with other people is freedom encompassed. It’s also sexy and exciting to hear and see and read different people’s takes on the ticks and clicks of life functioning all around us.
Maybe nothing feels so chest-burstingly beautiful as making sure we all have access to the knowledge and tools to control our own thoughts and lives and educations and spirits and voices.
The two biggest public expansions of information in human history, the printed word and the internet, need some love. In the US, the internet’s under siege right now, and right now it’s also Banned Books Week. If you have a nice library or a superfast friendly phone, all the more reason to help extend those rights to folks who don’t. 

Passwords, watchwords, secrets, The Fine Print — access to ideas more than might and more than money is the origin of power, as the saying goes-ish. Sometimes it’s almost batfuck loco how much power information contains. Kierkegaard: People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for freedom of thought, which they seldom use. 

The ability to think what you want, to share ideas with other people is freedom encompassed. It’s also sexy and exciting to hear and see and read different people’s takes on the ticks and clicks of life functioning all around us.

Maybe nothing feels so chest-burstingly beautiful as making sure we all have access to the knowledge and tools to control our own thoughts and lives and educations and spirits and voices.

The two biggest public expansions of information in human history, the printed word and the internet, need some love. In the US, the internet’s under siege right now, and right now it’s also Banned Books Week. If you have a nice library or a superfast friendly phone, all the more reason to help extend those rights to folks who don’t. 


Today is a very, very good birthday.

Today is a very, very good birthday.


“I really sing songs that move me. I’m not in show business; I’m in the communications business. That’s what it’s about for me.”

On August 15th, 1969, Richie Havens opened Woodstock — birthplace of the sort of magic we have come to seek from music festivals. After three (yes three!) hours of performing, having been called back several times and having ran out of songs, Richie improvised a song based on the old gospel “Motherless Child.” His version, “Freedom,” instantly became — and remains 44 years later — a hymn for generations of people actively hoping and working to make our world a better place.

Although he was more of a discrete figure of the Village, Havens never gave up militantism through his humanist music, and his legacy of over 25 albums is often cited as a major influence for younger musicians.

Richie passed away at age 72 on Earth Day. Because we too are hopers, we like to think of this coincidence as one last message from the artist to us.

Rest in peace.


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