In honor of Go Skateboarding Day and all its concomitant glory — legal, illegal and otherwise — we’re hosting Skate Related in the Ace New York Gallery space through July 7. The show features prints and designs — by rad folk like Mr. Mike Burrill —  inspired by life on the deck, as well as our Shut x Ace Excelsior skate deck. And yes, that is Justin Beiber. 


Photos by Can’t Stop Won’t Stop

In honor of Go Skateboarding Day and all its concomitant glory — legal, illegal and otherwise — we’re hosting Skate Related in the Ace New York Gallery space through July 7. The show features prints and designs — by rad folk like Mr. Mike Burrill —  inspired by life on the deck, as well as our Shut x Ace Excelsior skate deck. And yes, that is Justin Beiber. 

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Photos by Can’t Stop Won’t Stop


INTERVIEW : WENDY MACNAUGHTON BY JOCELYN K. GLEI
San Francisco-based illustrator and artist Wendy MacNaughton’s illustrations have the improvisational quality of an observer, a lone wolf. She uses illustration to weave a facetious and compassionate homage to the mundanities and Seinfeldesque neuroses that tie us all together. As a sort of visual afterparty to Behance’s 99% Conference, Wendy’s collection Guts, Grit and Getting *%!# Done will be up in the gallery space at Ace Hotel New York May 9 - June 8. It’s an illustrated inventory of making ideas happen based on Wendy’s observations, insights and takeaways from the conference.
Jocelyn K. Glei, Director of the 99% Think Tank and Conference, interviewed Wendy about how to change your life by not doing yoga.
How would you describe your work to, say, my grandmother?
First I’d apologize. Then I’d tell her I draw from observation — of people, circumstances, places, life — and tell stories through pictures and words. And no, sorry Nana, not like Norman Rockwell.
You seem to have a particular fascination with pointing out the details — half-empty whiskey glasses, lonely sandwiches, etc. Why?
The little things tell the story — we get swept up by the big picture but I think the little unnoticed details tell us more about what’s really going on.
There are also quite a few pieces related to thinking too much and procrastinating… What’s your preferred mode of procrastination? 
Let me think on that and get back to you. But really, folks. I know if I overthink an idea, it ends up spoiling it. Knowing that, the risk is over thinking not thinking about it. I guess I catch myself coming and going. It’s a challenge to put things aside and just have fun with an idea. That’s what drawing does for me. It clears my head out and I get to play — ideas come on their own.  
You have a lot of sketches from attending book readings… what was the last great book you read?
I beg everyone to read Miranda July’s It Chooses You. Not only is she a great writer, but this true story is super relevant to people working in, on and around technology and who are interested in human connection and storytelling.  
A lot of your illustrations seem to happen in transit (airports, events, street corners) — is there something in particular that’s appealing about transitional spaces and moments?
When in transit, people reflect, mull, worry, remember, sleep… These are all very intimate acts to be doing in a public space. And I love to eavesdrop. So I guess drawing in public is like visual eavesdropping on someone’s private time. It’s also very mediative for me. Drawing allows my brain to stop moving (see question above). Kind of like putting a baby to sleep in a moving car. 
Who or what recently inspired you to do something differently?
At a conference recently a friend asked me what I was going to do the next morning. I said, yoga. He said, do you always go to yoga at home? I said, yes. He said, well since you’re not at home, why not do something you can’t do at home? And i did. And it ended up being a profound, life-altering experience.
(And sorry, I am not telling you what it was.)

INTERVIEW : WENDY MACNAUGHTON BY JOCELYN K. GLEI

San Francisco-based illustrator and artist Wendy MacNaughton’s illustrations have the improvisational quality of an observer, a lone wolf. She uses illustration to weave a facetious and compassionate homage to the mundanities and Seinfeldesque neuroses that tie us all together. As a sort of visual afterparty to Behance’s 99% Conference, Wendy’s collection Guts, Grit and Getting *%!# Done will be up in the gallery space at Ace Hotel New York May 9 - June 8. It’s an illustrated inventory of making ideas happen based on Wendy’s observations, insights and takeaways from the conference.

Jocelyn K. Glei, Director of the 99% Think Tank and Conference, interviewed Wendy about how to change your life by not doing yoga.

How would you describe your work to, say, my grandmother?

First I’d apologize. Then I’d tell her I draw from observation — of people, circumstances, places, life — and tell stories through pictures and words. And no, sorry Nana, not like Norman Rockwell.

You seem to have a particular fascination with pointing out the details — half-empty whiskey glasses, lonely sandwiches, etc. Why?

The little things tell the story — we get swept up by the big picture but I think the little unnoticed details tell us more about what’s really going on.

There are also quite a few pieces related to thinking too much and procrastinating… What’s your preferred mode of procrastination? 

Let me think on that and get back to you. But really, folks. I know if I overthink an idea, it ends up spoiling it. Knowing that, the risk is over thinking not thinking about it. I guess I catch myself coming and going. It’s a challenge to put things aside and just have fun with an idea. That’s what drawing does for me. It clears my head out and I get to play — ideas come on their own.  

You have a lot of sketches from attending book readings… what was the last great book you read?

I beg everyone to read Miranda July’s It Chooses You. Not only is she a great writer, but this true story is super relevant to people working in, on and around technology and who are interested in human connection and storytelling.  

A lot of your illustrations seem to happen in transit (airports, events, street corners) — is there something in particular that’s appealing about transitional spaces and moments?

When in transit, people reflect, mull, worry, remember, sleep… These are all very intimate acts to be doing in a public space. And I love to eavesdrop. So I guess drawing in public is like visual eavesdropping on someone’s private time. It’s also very mediative for me. Drawing allows my brain to stop moving (see question above). Kind of like putting a baby to sleep in a moving car. 

Who or what recently inspired you to do something differently?

At a conference recently a friend asked me what I was going to do the next morning. I said, yoga. He said, do you always go to yoga at home? I said, yes. He said, well since you’re not at home, why not do something you can’t do at home? And i did. And it ended up being a profound, life-altering experience.

(And sorry, I am not telling you what it was.)

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Matt Black is showing Something Black through January 5 in the gallery space at Ace Hotel New York.

Matt Black is showing Something Black through January 5 in the gallery space at Ace Hotel New York.

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INTERVIEW : MATT BLACK

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Matt Black is a director, image-maker and old friend born in Paris, now based in NYC, who has been crafting images on the streets, for high fashion, in film and for some of our favorite publications in the world for decades. He’s presenting Something Black, his first solo show, in the gallery space at Ace Hotel New York through January 5. The exhibition is a visually arresting collection of his work exploring American iconography, and features nine new original pieces including a collaboration with tattoo artist Mike Rubendall. A limited selection of prints are available at Ace Hotel New York and on our online shop.

Matt grew up in Paris and became inspired at a young age by American culture, moving to New York City in 1998. His style fuses the cinematics of high fashion with the urgency of street art. He’s directed short films with the like of Paz de la Huerta and Rinko Kikuchi, and has created work for Dior, Louis Vuitton, Jil Sander, Porter and Joseph. He also shot our Beams Japan x Wings + Horns boxing collection at Gleason’s Gym in Manhattan. As the worlds of art and street culture become more intertwined, we love that Matt retains his eye for the authentic and the visionary. He shared with us a little bit about what makes him tick.

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I AM WORKING MAINLY WITH A BLACK AND WHITE PALETTE. IN FLATTENING THE COLOR, I CAN FOCUS ON TEXTURE THROUGH DIFFERENT MEDIUMS, BUILDING ON CONTRAST AND TONE TO CREATE A BALANCED AND LAYERED IMAGE.

AS WE ARE NOW SO IMMERSED IN A DIGITAL AGE, I HAVE BEEN PLAYING WITH THE IDEA OF MIXING THESE DIGITALLY REORGANIZED IMAGES WITH UNTAMPERED PHOTOGRAPHS, CUTTING AND PASTING THE TWO TOGETHER IN AN ATTEMPT TO KEEP A HUMAN TOUCH AND SENSE OF ACCIDENT IN MY WORK.

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I HAVE IN MY STUDIO A COLLECTION OF VARIOUS OBJECTS, BOOKS AND IMAGES, SOME OF WHICH HAVE BEEN HERE FOR A WHILE SOME OF WHICH REFLECT MY CURRENT MOOD AND INSPIRATIONS…

I LIKE THE IDEA OF CURATING MY SURROUNDING ON IMPULSE WITHIN THE GUIDELINES OF MY AESTHETIC.

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I’M INSPIRED BY ARAKI NOBUYOSHI, HELMUT NEWTON, ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE, LARRY CLARK…

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I HAVE TWO WAYS THAT I LIKE TO MAKE IMAGES. ONE IS SPONTANEOUS, WHERE I SIMPLY CAPTURE A MOMENT. THE OTHER IS DELIBERATE, WHERE I STAGE THE SUBJECT OR SCENE IN A FRAME I CREATE. I HAVE BEEN PLAYING WITH THE IDEA OF MIXING THE TWO TO GIVE A SENSE OF REALITY WHILE EXPLORING ICONS THAT CONTINUALLY APPEALE TO ME ON A PERSONAL LEVEL. THE LANDSCAPES AND BACKGROUNDS WORK EITHER AS STAGES OR BRIDGES TO THE REAL WORLD.

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Prints top to bottom are Werewolf (with Mike Rubendall), South of No North and Totem.


THIS LA is a gallery we like. We invited them to traverse the nation and a show in our gallery space at Ace Hotel New York, and they took us up on our dare. Enjoy some shots from opening night, and stop by to see the show — it’s up through the end of the month, and all prints are for sale. See more about taking the work home here.

THIS LA is a gallery we like. We invited them to traverse the nation and a show in our gallery space at Ace Hotel New York, and they took us up on our dare. Enjoy some shots from opening night, and stop by to see the show — it’s up through the end of the month, and all prints are for sale. See more about taking the work home here.

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Levi’s and Urban Outfitters present shorts from the Bicycle Film Festival, as curated by festival founder and director, Brendt Barbur, this Sunday at Ace Hotel New York. After being hit by a bus while riding his bike in NYC, Brendt felt compelled to start the festival as a platform to celebrate bicycles through music, art and film. He’ll be at the screening and staying after for a Q&A.

The screening is part of a whole weekend celebrating the saddle and wheel at Ace New York, and a larger cross-country tour with Levi’s beginning at Ace NYC and ending at Ace Portland, including a mobile, pop-up bike shop where you can tune up your bike with the best of them — the shop appears at Ace NYC this weekend on Friday and Sunday.

While you’re here, check out our gallery show with New York-based artist Michael Kim, Bicycles, up today through August 9, presented by Levi’s. For several years, Michael has collected photographs of bicycles from daily newspapers around the world being put to use for work and play by everybody under the sun. The images remind us that bicycles are inextricably part of our daily lives — pulled out of context, they’re highlighted as almost extra appendages in the machinations of our lives, and as a symbol of commonality among all people.

As part of the project, we’re happy to announce that Ace NYC and Ace PDX will be receiving four custom, hand-built bikes by Thomas Callahan of Brooklyn’s Horse Cycles and Jordan Hufnagel of Portland’s Hufnagel Cycles, respectively. These fine steeds are being crafted exclusively for Ace and will be available for guests to use. Stay tuned for more.

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All images collected in Michael Kim’s Bicycles exhibition in our gallery.


Another shot from Dasein: Invitation to Hang at Ace Hotel New York.

Another shot from Dasein: Invitation to Hang at Ace Hotel New York.


A nice shot of Chase Jarvis in the Dasein : Invitation to Hang gallery at Ace New York. Be sure to visit his site to submit, or on Twitter with #Dasein. As you know, Mister Reggie Watts dropped in on our Live Music Series on Sunday night and Chase got some riveting footage of him in room 408.

A nice shot of Chase Jarvis in the Dasein : Invitation to Hang gallery at Ace New York. Be sure to visit his site to submit, or on Twitter with #Dasein. As you know, Mister Reggie Watts dropped in on our Live Music Series on Sunday night and Chase got some riveting footage of him in room 408.


Some images from the Exhibition A MONOCHROME SET show in the gallery space at Ace Hotel New York, up now through April 8. Special for St Paddy’s Day: a signed, limited edition of 10 prints by Leo Fitzpatrick’s “KILL ME I’M IRISH” for $250. Only available through today at the hotel and on Exhibition A.

Other prints in the show are by Terence Koh, Hanna Liden, Nate Lowman, Josephine Meckseper, Olympia Scarry, Peter Sutherland and Olivier Zahm. And go read about Exhibition A if you’re bored at work today — they’re awesome.


Ace Hotel New York is the official hotel partner of Armory Focus: Latin America, taking place Thursday through Sunday at Piers 92 & 94. We’re highlighting the exhibition by showcasing Brazilian Artist Thiago Rocha Pitta in our gallery from today through March 8, curated by Rita Pinto. His watercolor “Project for a pating with storm and urban (triptych),” 2009, is above.
Stop by and check it out, and stay tuned for more in the gallery space later this month.

Ace Hotel New York is the official hotel partner of Armory Focus: Latin America, taking place Thursday through Sunday at Piers 92 & 94. We’re highlighting the exhibition by showcasing Brazilian Artist Thiago Rocha Pitta in our gallery from today through March 8, curated by Rita Pinto. His watercolor “Project for a pating with storm and urban (triptych),” 2009, is above.

Stop by and check it out, and stay tuned for more in the gallery space later this month.


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