Dear mother nature. We really love you — it’s an unabashed, corny kind of love. We are in it for life. And we know that, as a species, we’ve been and continue to be a dense band of jackasses regarding your health. We ask, however, that you might take it a little easy on fair Gotham for a bit. They’ve taken a harsh blow. They walk everywhere and ride the train more than any other city in the nation — they really are trying. For now, we’ve made a poster, postcard and tote bag to help out. 100% of proceeds go to New York Cares to aid them in their Hurricane Sandy relief efforts — because it’s really one borough and we’re all in this together. Tally ho!

Dear mother nature. We really love you — it’s an unabashed, corny kind of love. We are in it for life. And we know that, as a species, we’ve been and continue to be a dense band of jackasses regarding your health. We ask, however, that you might take it a little easy on fair Gotham for a bit. They’ve taken a harsh blow. They walk everywhere and ride the train more than any other city in the nation — they really are trying. For now, we’ve made a poster, postcard and tote bag to help out. 100% of proceeds go to New York Cares to aid them in their Hurricane Sandy relief efforts — because it’s really one borough and we’re all in this together. Tally ho!


Rudy’s are good people. They’re our neighbor in Manhattan and Seattle (and elsewhere) and now they have a new outpost in Williamsburg — a mercantile for which 100% of profits are going to support Waves for Water's Hurricane Sandy relief efforts. Stop by for a haircut, some Stumptown Coffee and good, upstanding holiday gifts for your loved ones and yourself. If you’re staying with us at Ace, flash your room key for 10% off everything in the shop.









All snapshots from Rudy’s Facebook page.

Rudy’s are good people. They’re our neighbor in Manhattan and Seattle (and elsewhere) and now they have a new outpost in Williamsburg — a mercantile for which 100% of profits are going to support Waves for Water's Hurricane Sandy relief efforts. Stop by for a haircut, some Stumptown Coffee and good, upstanding holiday gifts for your loved ones and yourself. If you’re staying with us at Ace, flash your room key for 10% off everything in the shop.

All snapshots from Rudy’s Facebook page.


This is a Jean-Georges Vongerichten crunchy chicken sub from No. 7 at Ace Hotel New York, lounging over Manhattan, luxuriating in its Asian pear, pickled chili and shiso self. Proceeds from this beauty, available through Saturday, are donated to Hurricane Sandy relief efforts by the St. Jacobi Lutheran Church in Brooklyn, a major hub for volunteer efforts by Occupy Sandy since almost before the winds were gone. Impressions at the Ace blog secret tasting headquarters ran from epiphanic to “like experiencing Alice Coltrane’s Universal Consciousness in flavor.” 

This is a Jean-Georges Vongerichten crunchy chicken sub from No. 7 at Ace Hotel New York, lounging over Manhattan, luxuriating in its Asian pear, pickled chili and shiso self. Proceeds from this beauty, available through Saturday, are donated to Hurricane Sandy relief efforts by the St. Jacobi Lutheran Church in Brooklyn, a major hub for volunteer efforts by Occupy Sandy since almost before the winds were gone. Impressions at the Ace blog secret tasting headquarters ran from epiphanic to “like experiencing Alice Coltrane’s Universal Consciousness in flavor.” 


WFMU out of Jersey City is like a shining tower on a hill broadcasting the amazing creative potential of free form listener-supported radio to the world. Sandy opened up some kick-ass on them as she was passing through, taking down both of their FM transmitters and frying a bunch of computers and equipment. They were down for a couple days but didn’t take long to brush their shoulders off and get back on air.

Unfortunately, their annual Record Fair was canceled since the venue where it was scheduled was without power, meaning one of their biggest funding sources for the year was gone, like the dough they laid out in advance to organize and promote it.

But listeners have rallied to help out and it could have been worse. Some kind of aural providence kept these blessed stacks good and dry.

Even their collection of glitterized album cover art was spared.

Photos by Brianna Wilson

And, thank heavens, their cassette copy of The Rudy Schwartz Project’s Yodelin’ Satan. Still, the months ahead at WFMU won’t be easy without a little help from their friends. Good thing they’ve built quite the cache of goodwill with all the weirdness they’ve infused into the airwaves lo these many years.  


Our fair Gotham took a few hits recently but New York can get down without ever being out. As New Yorkers go, we can’t complain. Our extended Ace Hotel New York family came through the way they always do for each other and so did our guests and friends. Not all of New York was so fortunate though. Some New Yorkers could use a hand to get back their NYC swagger and keep keeping on. 
We’re donating 10% of all proceeds on the online shop to New York Cares for the next week starting now. In the meanwhile, we’re working on some special wares to benefit recovery efforts with some artists we know and our in-house design team. Until all of NYC is back on its feet, we’re just going to act like this whole archipelago is one big borough and we’ll be looking out for ways to help those in need and ways our friends around here and around the world can plug in to volunteer their time, donations and creativity. We’ll keep you posted.

Our fair Gotham took a few hits recently but New York can get down without ever being out. As New Yorkers go, we can’t complain. Our extended Ace Hotel New York family came through the way they always do for each other and so did our guests and friends. Not all of New York was so fortunate though. Some New Yorkers could use a hand to get back their NYC swagger and keep keeping on. 

We’re donating 10% of all proceeds on the online shop to New York Cares for the next week starting now. In the meanwhile, we’re working on some special wares to benefit recovery efforts with some artists we know and our in-house design team. Until all of NYC is back on its feet, we’re just going to act like this whole archipelago is one big borough and we’ll be looking out for ways to help those in need and ways our friends around here and around the world can plug in to volunteer their time, donations and creativity. We’ll keep you posted.


INTERVIEW : BIG FREEDIA THE QUEEN DIVA SENDS HER BEST WISHES TO NY

It’s not quite clear if New York will have to weather the Sandy aftermath with or without Big Freedia — who we realize needs no introduction here. The Nola Bounce Queen Diva’s scheduled Halloween show at Brooklyn Bowl is looking likely — but nobody can make any promises. We got in touch with her Monday in the Crescent City via phone, where she chatted with us about the music and politics of bounce and sent her prayers from storm country.

There’s been a couple darker records to come out of New Orleans post-Katrina — like Juvenile’s Reality Check comes to mind. But overall New Orleans music is pretty joyful — especially for having been through something like that. Why is that? What makes it so resilient?

Well, definitely Bounce music is more of a happy music, and then you know we have all other other types of music here in New Orleans — the Jazz and Brass bands and even the Hip Hop, some of them keep it positive. We have a lot of versatility here and we use that. 

Yeah, it seems like that can’t-keep-it-down energy is just engrained in the musical culture, sort of like a jazz funeral. How do you feel about the term “Sissy Bounce”? The piece in the New York Times a couple years ago said the artists didn’t really like it — not because of the word ‘sissy’ but because they just didn’t want to be separated from Bounce music in general. 

Right, we don’t separate it here in New Orleans. It’s all bounce music. There’s no such thing as Sissy Bounce. We have some gay artists who do this music but we don’t separate it. There’s a lot of straight artists, [many who came before] the gay artists who feel offended when people be saying Sissy Bounce because it’s not Sissy Bounce, it’s Bounce music in general — New Orleans is really open to all artists.

Does it ever get competitive in Bounce? Are there battles like there are in other genres of Hip Hop?

Oh definitely (Laughs). We get competitive in many ways. When there’s a hottest artist all the other artists are trying to get to that point and they’re definitely gunning for that artist. 

Any battles you’ve had you want to talk about?

No, but I’m always battling. That’s why I’m always on stage. 

Are you still doing interior decorating?

Yeah, every chance I get I am.

As you tour more does it get harder to do that?

Yeah, it does. I’m touring a whole lot more and it’s been a challenge to try to decorate and perform at the same time. When I’m not here though I send out my staff and they go take care of it. 

The more you tour and do shows around the country, is the vibe at a Bounce show becoming more similar to the way it is in New Orleans?

Yeah, it’s changing a lot. They’re learning the music. They’re jamming even more. They’re learning the dances. It’s feeling more and more like home everywhere I go.  

How do you feel the rebuilding effort in New Orleans is going at this point? 

I’m very excited with the way that the city’s coming back. It’s amazing what they’re doing. It’s an uplift on the whole city — it’s a slow process but it’s definitely changing.  

Do you feel like the music scene is back in full swing?

I would say yes. It’s gotten back to where it needs to be at. It can always get stronger and bigger and better.

Quintron mentioned you in his shortlist of New Orleans artists when we interviewed him a few weeks back. Have you played with Quintron and Miss Pussycat?   

Oh yeah, definitely. We’ve performed together before. When I first started touring a lot, Quintron was a big help with that. Yeah, he’s very familiar with me and I’m very familiar with him.

We have our own storm situation here as you know. 

Yes and I’m very disappointed. I’m praying for you guys that the best happens, that God takes control over the whole situation. We’re a storm city here so we’re definitely praying that you guys will be safe.

Photo by Bon Duke for The Block Magazine


Fortunately, Sandy never hit Ace Hotel New York hard enough to make us crank up the back-up generator on the roof. Danny and the other guys at the Ace Engineering Department were ready though, just in case she did. Thanks guys.

Fortunately, Sandy never hit Ace Hotel New York hard enough to make us crank up the back-up generator on the roof. Danny and the other guys at the Ace Engineering Department were ready though, just in case she did. Thanks guys.


Charging up outside the hotel to stay in touch with family and friends — photo by Christine Roberts. Look out for each other out there.

Charging up outside the hotel to stay in touch with family and friends — photo by Christine Roberts. Look out for each other out there.


Wise and timely words from Nick van Woert, spelled out in found steel, polyurethane adhesive, plexiglass, hair gel and chlorine. Stay safe, New York.

Wise and timely words from Nick van Woert, spelled out in found steel, polyurethane adhesive, plexiglass, hair gel and chlorine. Stay safe, New York.


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