New Windsor, NY
About an hour north of the George Washington Bridge, near the mountain that serves as its mega-apocalyptic namesake, Storm King Art Center is dotted with monuments and reminders of virtually every post-WWII name in large-scale, site-specific sculptural work. The landscape’s 500-acres are fittingly dramatic and alive — woodlands and farm fields where structural pieces share quarters with red fox, wild turkey, groundhogs, red-tail hawks, turtles. 
Storm King’s sharing a peek at a pair of their special exhibitions on view this year with the Gallery at Ace Hotel New York this month — Zhang Huan: Evoking Tradition and Outlooks: Virginia Overton — plus free admission to the center for guests.
photo of Alexander Calder’s “Black Flag,” via @meltingbutterdotcom

New Windsor, NY

About an hour north of the George Washington Bridge, near the mountain that serves as its mega-apocalyptic namesake, Storm King Art Center is dotted with monuments and reminders of virtually every post-WWII name in large-scale, site-specific sculptural work. The landscape’s 500-acres are fittingly dramatic and alive — woodlands and farm fields where structural pieces share quarters with red fox, wild turkey, groundhogs, red-tail hawks, turtles. 

Storm King’s sharing a peek at a pair of their special exhibitions on view this year with the Gallery at Ace Hotel New York this month — Zhang Huan: Evoking Tradition and Outlooks: Virginia Overton — plus free admission to the center for guests.

photo of Alexander Calder’s “Black Flag,” via @meltingbutterdotcom


Isamu Noguchi was a dreamer, a renegade and a sort of self-ordained formalist, following the idiosyncratic logic of the physical poetry to which he devoted his life and mind. Born in Los Angeles to a poet and an editor, his inspiration came from the spaces between meaning — using his formidable talent and his willingness to risk, he created a new bone structure for the physical and emotional atmospheres in which we live. Pictured here, the artist as a young man (and a crush-worthy one at that), and his sketches, Worksheets for Sculpture, 1945. Noguchi’s We are the Landscape of All We Know has migrated west temporarily from the Noguchi Museum in Long Island to the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon, on view through July 21.

Isamu Noguchi was a dreamer, a renegade and a sort of self-ordained formalist, following the idiosyncratic logic of the physical poetry to which he devoted his life and mind. Born in Los Angeles to a poet and an editor, his inspiration came from the spaces between meaning — using his formidable talent and his willingness to risk, he created a new bone structure for the physical and emotional atmospheres in which we live. Pictured here, the artist as a young man (and a crush-worthy one at that), and his sketches, Worksheets for Sculpture, 1945. Noguchi’s We are the Landscape of All We Know has migrated west temporarily from the Noguchi Museum in Long Island to the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon, on view through July 21.

Isamu Noguchi Ace Hotel Japanese Garden Portland


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