Tonight, Know Your City, the aptly-named non-profit dedicated to connecting people to place —  and formerly the Dill Pickle Club, who we’ve long known and loved and learned from — is making moves. 
On a day-to-day basis, they organize tours, lectures and youth programs and preach the gospel of the Pacific Northwest come rain or, occasionally, shine. 
Now, they’re getting ready to mobilize their message — literally, they want to buy a kiosk on wheels and bike it around town — but need a little help from their friends. Join them tonight for A Night in the Alley as they promote “Kiosk Awareness,” or do their best to gather support for their latest and greatest initiative. If you can’t make it, their Kickstarter campaign has more information on their mission and message, and it’s the place to go to pitch in. Make haste though, Internet friends, as this golden opportunity to lend a hand to professional lend-a-handers ends on Kickstarter November 28. And perhaps most importantly, you could get pickles. 

Tonight, Know Your City, the aptly-named non-profit dedicated to connecting people to place —  and formerly the Dill Pickle Club, who we’ve long known and loved and learned from — is making moves. 

On a day-to-day basis, they organize tours, lectures and youth programs and preach the gospel of the Pacific Northwest come rain or, occasionally, shine. 

Now, they’re getting ready to mobilize their message — literally, they want to buy a kiosk on wheels and bike it around town — but need a little help from their friends. Join them tonight for A Night in the Alley as they promote “Kiosk Awareness,” or do their best to gather support for their latest and greatest initiative. If you can’t make it, their Kickstarter campaign has more information on their mission and message, and it’s the place to go to pitch in. Make haste though, Internet friends, as this golden opportunity to lend a hand to professional lend-a-handers ends on Kickstarter November 28. And perhaps most importantly, you could get pickles. 


The team at LODOWN Magazine in Berlin are resurrecting an old prototype for an electric car from the 70s, the Electro Lotus E-Spirit. Their project is remarkable and inspiring. Check it out and support their Kickstarter.
LODOWN also just announced a new app — you can download it for free.

The team at LODOWN Magazine in Berlin are resurrecting an old prototype for an electric car from the 70s, the Electro Lotus E-Spirit. Their project is remarkable and inspiring. Check it out and support their Kickstarter.

LODOWN also just announced a new app — you can download it for free.


BALTIMORE : ARABBER MURAL PROJECT

Gaia is a right-on dude who’s working with Mata Ruda, LNY and Nanook on this important mural project in Baltimore in support of the local arabber community. This project builds off of the mural produced by Gaia last fall for the arabbers on Fremont Avenue and will serve as a segue into transforming the yard into historic preservation site.

Arabbing as a practice began in the 19th century in Baltimore when easy access to stables and the shipyards of the inner harbor made selling fruit with horse drawn carriages an attainable entrepreneurial enterprise for African Americans in Baltimore. During the war effort and after WWII arabbing became an almost entirely African American trade. Competition from supermarkets and restrictions from modern zoning laws have endangered this heritage. Today there are only a couple sites left that serve as arabbing stables, with the Fremont Avenue location being one of the most prominent in the city. Today, arabbing serves as a viable living for a handful of men and their families whilst also serving a variety of communities including neighborhoods that do not have easy access to produce and whole foods.

Mata Ruda, Gaia, Nanook and LNY will use the story and experience of Baltimore’s fruit sellers to produce murals that will span the entirety of inside and exterior of the Fremont stables. The paintings are apart of a larger plan that will be implemented on behalf of the Arabber Preservation Society in the near future to make the site into a visitor center and provide the necessary renovations to the preexisting stable.

Kick down if you can to help them realize this project.


Thomas Callahan of Horse Cycles built the bicycle fleet that docks at Ace Hotel New York. You can take one for a spin when you stay with us or get your own. Thomas crafts these two-wheeled vessels from durable lugged steel with his own two hands and other tools in his Williamsburg, Brooklyn shop.

He’s the kind of self-taught artisan born with the itch to build beautiful things that fetch you over bridges and down rush hour streams through ravines of office tower and tenement as you peddle your way, wind-in-your-hair and glad. We’re glad each time we set eyes or ass upon any of the fine steeds in our fleet. 

Thomas’s latest venture is the Urban Tour Project, a new production line of wheel-to-frame-to-wheel all made in America bikes, because eventually we might need to get back to making things. He’s trying to get the training wheels off this new line with a Kickstarter. That’s something we can pledge allegiance to, and a couple duckets.

Thomas Callahan of Horse Cycles built the bicycle fleet that docks at Ace Hotel New York. You can take one for a spin when you stay with us or get your own. Thomas crafts these two-wheeled vessels from durable lugged steel with his own two hands and other tools in his Williamsburg, Brooklyn shop.

He’s the kind of self-taught artisan born with the itch to build beautiful things that fetch you over bridges and down rush hour streams through ravines of office tower and tenement as you peddle your way, wind-in-your-hair and glad. We’re glad each time we set eyes or ass upon any of the fine steeds in our fleet. 

Thomas’s latest venture is the Urban Tour Project, a new production line of wheel-to-frame-to-wheel all made in America bikes, because eventually we might need to get back to making things. He’s trying to get the training wheels off this new line with a Kickstarter. That’s something we can pledge allegiance to, and a couple duckets.


We really love Reading Frenzy in Portland. It’s where we first read Doris and Burn Collector and everything by sts and got vintage postcards to send to our penpals before email shrunk our brains. RF lost their lease a few months ago and they’re looking for a new space. Hopefully you can kick down a little coin to help them make it happen — viva la real books!


In 1970, President Richard Nixon was scheduled at an American Legion convention in Portland, Oregon, in order to promote the continuation of the Vietnam War. A Portland-based anti-Vietnam War group, called the People’s Army Jamboree, planned a series of demonstrations to be held at the same time as the convention. Law enforcement, expecting massive numbers of protesters on both sides, were concerned about large-scale violence—an FBI report estimated a potential crowd of 25,000 Legionnaires and 50,000 anti-war protestors, and suggested that the result could be worse than the protests at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago.
In order to keep the peace, Republican Oregon Governor Tom McCall made an agreement with representatives of local anti-war factions to permit a rock festival to be held in a state park at the same time as Nixon’s scheduled visit, and to turn a blind eye toward behavior that had been widespread at the Woodstock Festival, like nudity and use of marijuana. McCall has been heard to remark that by making this agreement—less than three months before the upcoming November vote, in which he was running for re-election—he had “committed political suicide.” The festival was often called “The Governor’s Pot Party” by many Oregonians. McCall won re-election that November, defeating opponent Robert W. Straub handily.
- Mike Meacham, barefooted attendee of Vortex I
Our neighbor in Portland, the Dill Pickle Club —- Oregon’s most esteemed grassroots cultural history crew — is creating a comic about this strange and hardly believable tale of a Republican Governor, a bunch of hippies and the complicated sculpting of Oregon’s liberal reputation. The comic will be distributed for free at Tom McCall’s 100th birthday party in Portland this spring — help make it happen on their Kickstarter.

In 1970, President Richard Nixon was scheduled at an American Legion convention in Portland, Oregon, in order to promote the continuation of the Vietnam War. A Portland-based anti-Vietnam War group, called the People’s Army Jamboree, planned a series of demonstrations to be held at the same time as the convention. Law enforcement, expecting massive numbers of protesters on both sides, were concerned about large-scale violence—an FBI report estimated a potential crowd of 25,000 Legionnaires and 50,000 anti-war protestors, and suggested that the result could be worse than the protests at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago.

In order to keep the peace, Republican Oregon Governor Tom McCall made an agreement with representatives of local anti-war factions to permit a rock festival to be held in a state park at the same time as Nixon’s scheduled visit, and to turn a blind eye toward behavior that had been widespread at the Woodstock Festival, like nudity and use of marijuana. McCall has been heard to remark that by making this agreement—less than three months before the upcoming November vote, in which he was running for re-election—he had “committed political suicide.” The festival was often called “The Governor’s Pot Party” by many Oregonians. McCall won re-election that November, defeating opponent Robert W. Straub handily.

- Mike Meacham, barefooted attendee of Vortex I


Our neighbor in Portland, the Dill Pickle Club —- Oregon’s most esteemed grassroots cultural history crew — is creating a comic about this strange and hardly believable tale of a Republican Governor, a bunch of hippies and the complicated sculpting of Oregon’s liberal reputation. The comic will be distributed for free at Tom McCall’s 100th birthday party in Portland this spring — help make it happen on their Kickstarter.


Watch this, and take action.


Fig. 1
Roy Hudgins was an extraordinary person from Delhi, Louisiana. Our friend Aubree Bernier-Clarke, of Portlandia and Where the Wild Things Are, is making a documentary about this gender outlaw, songwriter (see Fig. 1), musician and individual of mysterious origin. She and her team have five days to raise money to finish the film — chip in if you can so we can all behold the resulting glory. Read all about it.

Fig. 1

Roy Hudgins was an extraordinary person from Delhi, Louisiana. Our friend Aubree Bernier-Clarke, of Portlandia and Where the Wild Things Are, is making a documentary about this gender outlaw, songwriter (see Fig. 1), musician and individual of mysterious origin. She and her team have five days to raise money to finish the film — chip in if you can so we can all behold the resulting glory. Read all about it.


Sonic Trace is the brainchild of radio producer Anayansi Diaz-Cortes — working with the LocaLore Initiative, she and her team are gathering stories from Latin American communities in and around Los Angeles in public (noisy) places about their experiences coming to, going from, staying in and returning to the US. They sent a call out to designers to pitch a portable sound booth and the winners, La Burbuja, have been working with Mat-ter to build this shiny, hypnotic orb pictured above — an illustration Mat-ter made of the booth at Plaza Mexico in LA. They have 48 hours to finish raising money for the project on Kickstarter so give them some strong love. We’re captivated, and very excited to see what’s on the horizon for this team.

Sonic Trace is the brainchild of radio producer Anayansi Diaz-Cortes — working with the LocaLore Initiative, she and her team are gathering stories from Latin American communities in and around Los Angeles in public (noisy) places about their experiences coming to, going from, staying in and returning to the US. They sent a call out to designers to pitch a portable sound booth and the winners, La Burbuja, have been working with Mat-ter to build this shiny, hypnotic orb pictured above — an illustration Mat-ter made of the booth at Plaza Mexico in LA. They have 48 hours to finish raising money for the project on Kickstarter so give them some strong love. We’re captivated, and very excited to see what’s on the horizon for this team.


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