The house known as The Castle doesn’t haunt Downtown LA in corporeal form these days, but if you look up, and you’re prone to daydream, maybe you’ll see a faint outline through the summer haze. The sprawling Victorian mansion — a backdrop for noir films like Kiss Me Deadly and Criss Cross — was one of the last holdouts of the fated Bunker Hill neighborhood that disappeared in the 60s, when the Hill was flattened so the saw teeth of progress could jut skyward from the urban plain. But long before the Community Redevelopment Agency doomed Bunker Hill the Castle was believed to be haunted, possibly by one of several residents that met untimely ends. Scheduled at one point for demolition, the Castle was saved by public outcry, and moved whole, only to be destroyed by arson. Our theory is that the ghosts of Bunker Hill still wander the corridors of Downtown LA. 

The house known as The Castle doesn’t haunt Downtown LA in corporeal form these days, but if you look up, and you’re prone to daydream, maybe you’ll see a faint outline through the summer haze. The sprawling Victorian mansion — a backdrop for noir films like Kiss Me Deadly and Criss Cross — was one of the last holdouts of the fated Bunker Hill neighborhood that disappeared in the 60s, when the Hill was flattened so the saw teeth of progress could jut skyward from the urban plain. But long before the Community Redevelopment Agency doomed Bunker Hill the Castle was believed to be haunted, possibly by one of several residents that met untimely ends. Scheduled at one point for demolition, the Castle was saved by public outcry, and moved whole, only to be destroyed by arson. Our theory is that the ghosts of Bunker Hill still wander the corridors of Downtown LA. 


We lift our mugs to Johnie’s Coffee Shop on Wilshire and Fairfax in the heart of LA on being nominated as a local landmark by the Los Angeles Conservancy. With your sloping, candy-striped roof, rock columns and miles of neon, you’re already a landmark in our moonage daydreams. Hey, is that Andre the Giant?

We lift our mugs to Johnie’s Coffee Shop on Wilshire and Fairfax in the heart of LA on being nominated as a local landmark by the Los Angeles Conservancy. With your sloping, candy-striped roof, rock columns and miles of neon, you’re already a landmark in our moonage daydreams. Hey, is that Andre the Giant?


LOS ANGELES
LA-based photographer Peter Bohler captured stills from one of our favorite earthbound fantasias, Arcosanti — the living dream of late Italian-American architect Paolo Soleri who passed this spring at age 93. Some of Peter’s thoughts on Paolo’s invention:


Arcosanti was conceived by Paolo Soleri as a new form of city—one that would exist in harmony with nature and promote community by being free of cars. He called his philosophy arcology, a merging of architecture and ecology. He found a home for his city in Arizona on the edge of a canyon an hour north of Phoenix.
Construction began in 1970, with a crew of volunteers casting Soleri’s sweeping concrete forms in the desert sand. Thirteen buildings were built this way through the 70’s and 80’s, but construction stalled because of a lack of funding. Originally intended to hold 5,000 people, today Arcosanti is home to a transient population of just 50 to 100 people.
Arcosanti supports itself through the creation of bronze and ceramic bells based on Soleri’s design. The residents first complete a five-week workshop on Soleri’s ideas, and then are employed either in the workshops or in the daily operation of the city. They comprise a community of idealists as Arcosanti slips from dream to relic.

LOS ANGELES

LA-based photographer Peter Bohler captured stills from one of our favorite earthbound fantasias, Arcosanti — the living dream of late Italian-American architect Paolo Soleri who passed this spring at age 93. Some of Peter’s thoughts on Paolo’s invention:

Arcosanti was conceived by Paolo Soleri as a new form of city—one that would exist in harmony with nature and promote community by being free of cars. He called his philosophy arcology, a merging of architecture and ecology. He found a home for his city in Arizona on the edge of a canyon an hour north of Phoenix.

Construction began in 1970, with a crew of volunteers casting Soleri’s sweeping concrete forms in the desert sand. Thirteen buildings were built this way through the 70’s and 80’s, but construction stalled because of a lack of funding. Originally intended to hold 5,000 people, today Arcosanti is home to a transient population of just 50 to 100 people.

Arcosanti supports itself through the creation of bronze and ceramic bells based on Soleri’s design. The residents first complete a five-week workshop on Soleri’s ideas, and then are employed either in the workshops or in the daily operation of the city. They comprise a community of idealists as Arcosanti slips from dream to relic.

Arcosanti

Arcosanti

Arcosanti


Ace Hotel #DTLA marquee baby steps.

Ace Hotel #DTLA marquee baby steps.


Shepard Fairey and some other people you may have heard of are looking for a logo for their campaign to re-awaken the latent beauty of the LA River. The Greenway 2020 project by the LA River Corp aims to create a continuous Greenway along the LA River by the year 2020, revitalizing an artery of the city as a linear hub for nature and recreation. As Shepard puts it, “I’ve always enjoyed the graffiti as a bit of flavor along the river, but few would call the LA River a scenic destination. That is about to change!” This is where you come in — they need a logo. But the deadline for submissions is today at 5pm Pacific. So drop everything, look at the specifications and signify. If your logo is chosen by Shepard and friends you score 2020 bones and get to be the proud creator of a symbol for change. 

Shepard Fairey and some other people you may have heard of are looking for a logo for their campaign to re-awaken the latent beauty of the LA River. The Greenway 2020 project by the LA River Corp aims to create a continuous Greenway along the LA River by the year 2020, revitalizing an artery of the city as a linear hub for nature and recreation. As Shepard puts it, “I’ve always enjoyed the graffiti as a bit of flavor along the river, but few would call the LA River a scenic destination. That is about to change!” This is where you come in — they need a logo. But the deadline for submissions is today at 5pm Pacific. So drop everything, look at the specifications and signify. If your logo is chosen by Shepard and friends you score 2020 bones and get to be the proud creator of a symbol for change. 


RARE VINYL SERIES: ORIGAMI VINYL, DTLANeil Schield : The Jacks, Vacant World
About five years back I was trolling the internet for Japanese Rock and stumbled upon some outdated website documenting the lost sounds of Japanese Garage Rock from the 60’s. Many of the bands were influenced by the sounds of The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Beach Boys. The Jacks were Japan’s most interesting and creative answer to that sound. Their album “Vacant World” displayed the most awesome heavy fuzz sound that spun my head around. I’ve been rocking this album ever since. Sadly the thing is so rare, I haven’t been able to get my hands on a copy. You can get a fix of The Jacks here, and read more about their releases on Garage Hangover.
We’re featuring rare vinyl profiles by some of our favorite record labels and shops around the world. Keep an eye out for more.

RARE VINYL SERIES: ORIGAMI VINYL, DTLA
Neil Schield : The Jacks, Vacant World

About five years back I was trolling the internet for Japanese Rock and stumbled upon some outdated website documenting the lost sounds of Japanese Garage Rock from the 60’s. Many of the bands were influenced by the sounds of The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Beach Boys. The Jacks were Japan’s most interesting and creative answer to that sound. Their album “Vacant World” displayed the most awesome heavy fuzz sound that spun my head around. I’ve been rocking this album ever since. Sadly the thing is so rare, I haven’t been able to get my hands on a copy. You can get a fix of The Jacks here, and read more about their releases on Garage Hangover.

We’re featuring rare vinyl profiles by some of our favorite record labels and shops around the world. Keep an eye out for more.


DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
Légumes printaniers spring green vegetables, red quinoa and garlic chips at Church & State in Downtown LA. Communion, in our book.

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES

Légumes printaniers spring green vegetables, red quinoa and garlic chips at Church & State in Downtown LA. Communion, in our book.


Isamu Noguchi was a dreamer, a renegade and a sort of self-ordained formalist, following the idiosyncratic logic of the physical poetry to which he devoted his life and mind. Born in Los Angeles to a poet and an editor, his inspiration came from the spaces between meaning — using his formidable talent and his willingness to risk, he created a new bone structure for the physical and emotional atmospheres in which we live. Pictured here, the artist as a young man (and a crush-worthy one at that), and his sketches, Worksheets for Sculpture, 1945. Noguchi’s We are the Landscape of All We Know has migrated west temporarily from the Noguchi Museum in Long Island to the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon, on view through July 21.

Isamu Noguchi was a dreamer, a renegade and a sort of self-ordained formalist, following the idiosyncratic logic of the physical poetry to which he devoted his life and mind. Born in Los Angeles to a poet and an editor, his inspiration came from the spaces between meaning — using his formidable talent and his willingness to risk, he created a new bone structure for the physical and emotional atmospheres in which we live. Pictured here, the artist as a young man (and a crush-worthy one at that), and his sketches, Worksheets for Sculpture, 1945. Noguchi’s We are the Landscape of All We Know has migrated west temporarily from the Noguchi Museum in Long Island to the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon, on view through July 21.

Isamu Noguchi Ace Hotel Japanese Garden Portland


The third annual LA Street Food Fest hits the Arcadian lanes at the Rose Bowl this weekend. Come break bread with fellow real food enthusiasts as we celebrate the continued world resurgence of bringing good handmade stuff to the masses by cart, truck or wheelbarrow. A ticket gets you unlimited goodness, so once you’re in you can eat like the Fat Boys in ‘85. We’re particularly looking forward to musubi by Mama Musubi, ceviche by Coni’Seafood, Pig ear chicharrones by Lazy Ox Canteen, sliders by Vagabond Grillyard, handmade dumplings by Bling Bling Dumpling and dragon’s beard candy by Dragon’s Beard and Whisker. Proceeds from the fest are donated to St. Vincent Meals On Wheels and Woolly School Garden.

The third annual LA Street Food Fest hits the Arcadian lanes at the Rose Bowl this weekend. Come break bread with fellow real food enthusiasts as we celebrate the continued world resurgence of bringing good handmade stuff to the masses by cart, truck or wheelbarrow. A ticket gets you unlimited goodness, so once you’re in you can eat like the Fat Boys in ‘85. We’re particularly looking forward to musubi by Mama Musubi, ceviche by Coni’SeafoodPig ear chicharrones by Lazy Ox Canteen, sliders by Vagabond Grillyard, handmade dumplings by Bling Bling Dumpling and dragon’s beard candy by Dragon’s Beard and Whisker. Proceeds from the fest are donated to St. Vincent Meals On Wheels and Woolly School Garden.


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