Downtown LA
The gesamtkunstwerk is alive and thriving. LA Chapter’s Exquisite Surfaces x Commune tiles honor the Viennese secession and issue a loving send-up to the Modernists who forever altered Los Angeles in the ‘20s. They function as angle-driven visual consorts rather than adornments, suggesting you follow their broken lines from the restaurant’s floor, across its walls to the ceiling and back down again. Like petroglyphs from a history that’s yet to be written.  

Downtown LA

The gesamtkunstwerk is alive and thriving. LA Chapter’s Exquisite Surfaces x Commune tiles honor the Viennese secession and issue a loving send-up to the Modernists who forever altered Los Angeles in the ‘20s. They function as angle-driven visual consorts rather than adornments, suggesting you follow their broken lines from the restaurant’s floor, across its walls to the ceiling and back down again. Like petroglyphs from a history that’s yet to be written.  


Downtown LA
Claire L. Evans looking like a million bucks in Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles’ photo booth.
Claire’s CV runneth over: she fronts utopia-pop outfit YACHT, is the editor-in-chief of the recent reboot of beloved science journal OMNI, and — along with YACHT co-hort/life-partner Jona Bechtolt — recently introduced the nimble, L.A.-centric events app 5 Every Day. Happy she was able to sit still for a few minutes.

Downtown LA

Claire L. Evans looking like a million bucks in Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles’ photo booth.

Claire’s CV runneth over: she fronts utopia-pop outfit YACHT, is the editor-in-chief of the recent reboot of beloved science journal OMNI, and — along with YACHT co-hort/life-partner Jona Bechtolt — recently introduced the nimble, L.A.-centric events app 5 Every Day. Happy she was able to sit still for a few minutes.


Downtown Los Angeles

"Love Me Like I’m Not Made Of Stone," from Lykke Li’s forthcoming I Never Learn.

Tickets for Lykke’s May 19 show at The Theatre at Ace Hotel, sponsored by Martin Guitar, go on sale tomorrow morning at 10am PST.


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Downtown Los Angeles

Simon and Lukas. The Haas Brothers. These true LA darlings and dear, new friends evidently didn’t get enough of us while outfitting LA Chapter and our mezzanine bar with smart pencil drawings of deeply-plumbed references to LA’s social history. Here’s some evidence of their enduring and inspirational presence. If you see them, say hello.


Downtown Los Angeles
In a recess of the rooftop lounge at Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles that once served as a transmitter tower for late-night devotional radio broadcasts, we now find this candelabra, brass-lined and gleaming by night over cocktailers and their companions.
Lux perpetua luceat eis.

Downtown Los Angeles

In a recess of the rooftop lounge at Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles that once served as a transmitter tower for late-night devotional radio broadcasts, we now find this candelabra, brass-lined and gleaming by night over cocktailers and their companions.

Lux perpetua luceat eis.


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Downtown Los Angeles

Kevin Willis is a journeyman. He’s an admirer of the ‘camp’ in antiquity and seems always to extract the eerie, underlying purpose from a thing where others see only pulp. Kevin is also a closely-kept member of our family and a contributor to Ace culture in ways that outmeasure just his physical work for us.

In the lobby at the Theater at Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles resides his Cathedral of Our Ladyfingers. She’s something of a sentry at the mouth of the Gothic grandeur that lies just beyond, taking IDs, looking like Mother Superior clipped from the celluloid of a Buñuel film. Her making was entirely in the clay-caked hands and mind of Kevin, but the inspiration was divine.


Downtown Los Angeles, California
The second edition of Printed Matter’s LA Art Book Fair kicked off last night in The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA as the fledgling of the famed NY Art Book Fair.  
Over 250 international outfits are taking part in the assembly, and the range of offerings is highly impressive. Everything is egalitarian, sharply presented and extremely tempting.
Hometown heroes Ooga Booga, KesselsKramer, and Arcana — who are making waves on the international scene — are paired with their out-of-town peers, simultaneously repping their work and acting as ambassadors.
The fair is going on until Sunday and is free to enter and enjoy, thanks to the selfless contributions of many. For more information and for the full schedule for screenings, panels, lectures and special events visit laartbookfair.net.

Downtown Los Angeles, California

The second edition of Printed Matter’s LA Art Book Fair kicked off last night in The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA as the fledgling of the famed NY Art Book Fair.  

Over 250 international outfits are taking part in the assembly, and the range of offerings is highly impressive. Everything is egalitarian, sharply presented and extremely tempting.

Hometown heroes Ooga BoogaKesselsKramer, and Arcana — who are making waves on the international scene — are paired with their out-of-town peers, simultaneously repping their work and acting as ambassadors.

The fair is going on until Sunday and is free to enter and enjoy, thanks to the selfless contributions of many. For more information and for the full schedule for screenings, panels, lectures and special events visit laartbookfair.net.


Los Angeles, California
Dave Hickey wrote and sent this over before his book signing yesterday. 
I am interested in the survival of the art world now that the distinction between the fine arts and popular arts has dissolved — now that the one-time congeniality of the cottage industry that created most of the great art of the twentieth century has been infected by the relentless, aggressive habits of corporate and institutional culture — now that the underground which once provided a home for cultural rebels has been obliterated. For the past one hundred and fifty years, the marketplace has censored popular art. What is popular is popular art. During the same period, high art has been defined by its ability to censor its audience to a knowledgeable and sophisticated audience defined by its ability to tolerate difficulty and dissonance.
During this period, popular art was always more popular than high art. Peter Max was always more popular than Andy Warhol. Andrew Wyeth was always more popular that Alex Katz. Salvador Dali was always more popular than Georges Braque. So how does high art survive when it can be censored by its “popularity.” In this new art world, difficulty and dissonance are routinely suppressed. Writers like myself whose livelihood has been grounded in the interpretation of difficult art are rendered obsolete. Scholars devoted to assessing the historical impact and viability of difficult art are rendered obsolete. The small contingent of dealers and collectors who take chances on behalf of difficult art are rendered inconsequent. Artist devoted to pushing the envelope are de-prioritized.
So what becomes of the tradition of dissonance and difficulty? It survives, I think, but nobody thinks about it. Art is simply defined by its opacity and left opaque, so there are no historical consequences to work that might be difficult to understand. It simply dwells in the tides of fashion as the sort of thing we don’t understand and don’t care to. So, difficult art will continue to be made but no one will notice. This leaves a space for a new underground where people might pay art more careful attention to the world before their eyes.
Photo by Toby Kamps.

Los Angeles, California

Dave Hickey wrote and sent this over before his book signing yesterday. 

I am interested in the survival of the art world now that the distinction between the fine arts and popular arts has dissolved — now that the one-time congeniality of the cottage industry that created most of the great art of the twentieth century has been infected by the relentless, aggressive habits of corporate and institutional culture — now that the underground which once provided a home for cultural rebels has been obliterated. For the past one hundred and fifty years, the marketplace has censored popular art. What is popular is popular art. During the same period, high art has been defined by its ability to censor its audience to a knowledgeable and sophisticated audience defined by its ability to tolerate difficulty and dissonance.

During this period, popular art was always more popular than high art. Peter Max was always more popular than Andy Warhol. Andrew Wyeth was always more popular that Alex Katz. Salvador Dali was always more popular than Georges Braque. So how does high art survive when it can be censored by its “popularity.” In this new art world, difficulty and dissonance are routinely suppressed. Writers like myself whose livelihood has been grounded in the interpretation of difficult art are rendered obsolete. Scholars devoted to assessing the historical impact and viability of difficult art are rendered obsolete. The small contingent of dealers and collectors who take chances on behalf of difficult art are rendered inconsequent. Artist devoted to pushing the envelope are de-prioritized.

So what becomes of the tradition of dissonance and difficulty?
It survives, I think, but nobody thinks about it. Art is simply defined by its opacity and left opaque, so there are no historical consequences to work that might be difficult to understand. It simply dwells in the tides of fashion as the sort of thing we don’t understand and don’t care to. So, difficult art will continue to be made but no one will notice. This leaves a space for a new underground where people might pay art more careful attention to the world before their eyes.


Photo by Toby Kamps.


Downtown Los Angeles, California
LA Chapter is celebrating its second week of existence. The new restaurant at Ace DTLA is helmed by Five Leaves Chef Ken Addington and restaurateur Jud Mongell.
Expect some of the same iconic dishes from the Brooklyn restaurant but with a truly LA spin.
Open daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner. To make a reservation call 213-623-3233.

Downtown Los Angeles, California

LA Chapter is celebrating its second week of existence. The new restaurant at Ace DTLA is helmed by Five Leaves Chef Ken Addington and restaurateur Jud Mongell.

Expect some of the same iconic dishes from the Brooklyn restaurant but with a truly LA spin.

Open daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
To make a reservation call 213-623-3233.


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