London, UK
A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.
How do you see yourself?
I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)
How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.
What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…
What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.
A secret power you would like to have?
              
To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…
All photos by Cheryl Dunn.

London, UK

A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.

How do you see yourself?

I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)

How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.

What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…

What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.

A secret power you would like to have?

              

To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…

All photos by Cheryl Dunn.


London, United Kingdom
"In 1950 out of sheer necessity, my husband Mr. Harold Morris and myself went into business as Industrial Clothing Specialists. 
Gloverall of London were the first clothiers to make the traditional Military and Naval Duffle coats available to civilians … In the 1950-60’s the Gloverall Duffle became a sartorial Symbol of Social Renegades. Angry young men, art students, and Beatniks favoured the Duffle coat.” — Excerpt from the Gloverall Story.
We had the honor of collaborating with the eternal English clothier for our Ace x Gloverall Duffle Coat — an update on a true British classic. It’s a thing of beauty, and you can find it here. 

London, United Kingdom

"In 1950 out of sheer necessity, my husband Mr. Harold Morris and myself went into business as Industrial Clothing Specialists. 

Gloverall of London were the first clothiers to make the traditional Military and Naval Duffle coats available to civilians … In the 1950-60’s the Gloverall Duffle became a sartorial Symbol of Social Renegades. Angry young men, art students, and Beatniks favoured the Duffle coat.” — Excerpt from the Gloverall Story.

We had the honor of collaborating with the eternal English clothier for our Ace x Gloverall Duffle Coat — an update on a true British classic. It’s a thing of beauty, and you can find it here


According to English folklore, the first person to enter the home on New Year’s Day will bring good fortune. Especially if it’s a tall dark-haired man, accompanied by a handful of coal, some good bread and a bottle of whiskey.
Happy NYE England!

According to English folklore, the first person to enter the home on New Year’s Day will bring good fortune. Especially if it’s a tall dark-haired man, accompanied by a handful of coal, some good bread and a bottle of whiskey.

Happy NYE England!


Merry Crimbo from the front desk in Shoreditch.

Merry Crimbo from the front desk in Shoreditch.


Hattie Fox’s winter arrangements, keeping Shoreditch tangly and wild. 

Hattie Fox’s winter arrangements, keeping Shoreditch tangly and wild. 


Friend and fashion luminary Louise Gray took on the task of trimming Hoi Polloi’s Christmas tree this year, and she’s once again outdone herself. What appears from a distance to be a neon-lit take on the traditional tree reveals itself on closer inspection to be densely arranged with decorative detritus from the pound-shop. Cheese graters, footballs, paper money, rubber gloves, fun fur handcuffs, a tutu, take-away cups and wire wool all sparkle with glitter and Sharpie graffiti. 
Gray’s garish delight will be on display at Hoi Polloi through New Year’s, lighting the dinner and day after for all the revelers taking in Ace’s festive Time Travel package. 

Friend and fashion luminary Louise Gray took on the task of trimming Hoi Polloi’s Christmas tree this year, and she’s once again outdone herself. What appears from a distance to be a neon-lit take on the traditional tree reveals itself on closer inspection to be densely arranged with decorative detritus from the pound-shop. Cheese graters, footballs, paper money, rubber gloves, fun fur handcuffs, a tutu, take-away cups and wire wool all sparkle with glitter and Sharpie graffiti. 

Gray’s garish delight will be on display at Hoi Polloi through New Year’s, lighting the dinner and day after for all the revelers taking in Ace’s festive Time Travel package



Because Cambridge University had a rule forbidding dogs, Lord Byron kept a pet bear while he was a student there. 

Because Cambridge University had a rule forbidding dogs, Lord Byron kept a pet bear while he was a student there. 


This summer we worked with A.P.C. to create custom quilts for our rooms in London — designer Jessica Ogden and founder Jean Touitou created a patchwork masterpiece out of fabrics from past A.P.C. collections.
Now that the quilts are in our rooms, on our beds, and quickly capturing the hearts of our travel-weary and comfort-seeking visitors, we asked Jessica to share her thoughts on the process, and some of the things inspiring her work right now. 

"As a child my mum made my brother and I quilts for our bed, she was the one who taught me how to sew, so the process is in her spirit.
It was amazing to then have Jean propose this idea to work on A.P.C. Quilts as it is also through his mum he has the love for this work.
We have our Mums to be thankful for to learn this beautiful craft.”
—Jessica Ogden

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Antique quilt reference with beautiful flowers and color.
 

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My Auntie Rosie, a beautiful lady, and a letter from her, my drawings of my cat and the sun reminding me of Jamaica where I was born.
 

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Sonia Delaunay, my all-time favorite textile artist.
 

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A page from my scrapbook: A Jessica Ogden dress 
next to a piece of Odette Touitou, Jean’s mum, patchwork.
 

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A page from The Quilts of Gee’s Bend. This is one of my favorite books, all homemade quilts made from what was on hand. The pieces made from work clothes are some of the highlights for me, as the clothes already have wear and tear, aged and patched, and then to be made into an object that also has age is beautiful to me. It’s history is visual and you feel they are made with love.
 

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Exhibition I saw in London on my last trip: Madge Gill, Outsider Artist.
 

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My family “Love” wall at home in Paris.
 

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Fabrics we used for the Ace x A.P.C. quilt.

Jessica would like to dedicate this piece to the memory of Alex Calderwood.

London-based poet, model and Ace friend Jack Royle recently released his first video, Chicken Town. This homage to John Cooper Clarke’s 1980’s "Evidently Chickentown" not only honors the English punk-poet but first and foremost resonates as the vivid testimony of a young lad in the jungle of the city, striving to speak up for himself.
Time has passed but the feelings remain unchanged.


London’s soft, loveworn damask underbelly is one of the things we love dearly about this place. One of the most forward-thinking spots in the multiverse, it is deeply rooted in its history via some very beautiful, threadbare stretches of brocade, porcelain and thrice-used linen teabags. This weekend will find us at Judy’s Vintage Furniture Flea, which celebrates midcentury british furniture and design, in Spitalfields just a few blocks from our Shoreditch outpost.

If you see us carting off with a donkeyload of fragile wicker picnic baskets, throne chairs and handsomely-aged sterling napkin rings, you’ll see that our reputation for minimalism is only part of the story.

London’s soft, loveworn damask underbelly is one of the things we love dearly about this place. One of the most forward-thinking spots in the multiverse, it is deeply rooted in its history via some very beautiful, threadbare stretches of brocade, porcelain and thrice-used linen teabags. This weekend will find us at Judy’s Vintage Furniture Flea, which celebrates midcentury british furniture and design, in Spitalfields just a few blocks from our Shoreditch outpost.

If you see us carting off with a donkeyload of fragile wicker picnic baskets, throne chairs and handsomely-aged sterling napkin rings, you’ll see that our reputation for minimalism is only part of the story.


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