We debuted our custom Ace radios with Scotland-based Revo today when we swung the doors open at Ace Hotel London Shoreditch. Each radio in-room boasts a curated set of hot buttons that act as a portal to our favorite new discoveries and classic standbys, including independent radio, soundscapes and Monocle's round-the-clock coverage of everything on the planet. We want to treat your ears as well as we can, and the planet, too. These radios feature a digital amplifier that reduces power consumption but increases the amount of creative power in your own mind.
We’ll be changing stations and sounds on the hot buttons over time. You can keep track of them all hear, just kidding here, and we’ll be posting more about the waves in the air over time right here.
1 : KEXPBorn in Seattle, KEXP is our #1 homie. But we share so much beyond a hometown. Our love of music, discovery and community have made us steadfast friends and long-time collaborators. On the air for over four decades, this tiny radio-station-that-could started as a 10-watt transmitter is located on top of McMahon Hall on the University of Washington campus. It’s since grown to one of the most celebrated and respected independent, community-driven radio stations on the planet. It won a Webby for Best Radio Website when the internet was just a wee baby in 2004, and even opened a branch in New York City, serving all five boroughs. For a few years, we’ve collaborated with KEXP to broadcast live from the lobby at Ace Hotel New York during CMJ, and we’ve made some really good friends along the way.
2 : NTS RadioWith their first radio broadcast just months behind them, London’s NTS was born, in a sort of KEXP reversal, from the blog nutstosoup.com (now laid to rest). NTS aims to fill a void in the community of musically and progressively minded Londoners (and citizens of the world). A unique platform for inspired people to present their findings, passions and obsessions, NTS draws on local wisdom of the young and old in London from label founders to magazine editors to style icons to musical discoverers sailing the rocky seas of basement shows and pirate internet stations and tape deck-only road trips to bring the best and brightest to your ears day and night.
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3 : Monocle 24Monocle is a global briefing on international affairs, business, culture and design headquartered in London. In print Monocle’s 10 issues a year are dense, book-ish and collectable, and call on a global team of staff editors and over thirty correspondents from Beirut to Milan, Washington to Singapore. Monocle 24, their round-the-clock radio station launched its first broadcast a couple autumns ago from Midori House in Marylebone. Delivering news and comment, plus magazine shows covering a range of topics including food and drink, urbanism, design and print media, their newsgathering operation will soon stretch to new bureaux in São Paulo and across Asia, as well as more correspondents in emerging and established territories. Monocle, with a sharp ear and astute eye on the world, are old friends of the Ace family and some of our favorite armchair and expert thinkers on everything from straight-lined to particulate and curvaceous topics of conversation.
4 : Resonance FMResonance FM celebrates the ‘art’ of radio and music, and tends toward programming that pushes the status quo for what radio can be. Framework is one of our favorite shows dedicated to soundscapes and field recording. The more London-local shows like The Hooting Yard (an hour of field-recorded sounds from the speaker’s point in Hyde Park) and The Pensioner’s Show (an hour of one, gruff fellow ranting about the current state of pensioners rights and news) get our hearts racing.
We actually learned about Resonance while listening to Do or DIY with Vicki Bennett of People Like Us on WFMU (Ace Revo Broadcast Two). Vicki was doing some collaborations with Ergo Phizmiz and, at the time, guest shows from the Resonance studios in London. There’s a really great show of Christian Marclay performing live at the London Tate near Christmas from about 2005. It’s an hour-long, sprawling mix of sounds and song and it’s wonderful. Resonance is an audio volcano of things you never knew how badly you wanted to listen to until you do and then you feel like your brain is bigger. That’s what they do.
5 : WFMUWFMU is like the radical big-brother of free-form stations across the country. They’re not tied to any university or college, they have little rules to follow and they been at it for decades. They have a ridiculously diverse range of shows and hosts. And their library! It can make a grown man cry. You can listen to a dedicated rap show for three hours and then go right into a bad talk/call-in for an hour, and then into a show dedicated to antique phonographs. And they do it all with volunteers, few paid staff and membership drives that defy the boring, disenchanting norm. Long live the Woof Moo.

We debuted our custom Ace radios with Scotland-based Revo today when we swung the doors open at Ace Hotel London Shoreditch. Each radio in-room boasts a curated set of hot buttons that act as a portal to our favorite new discoveries and classic standbys, including independent radio, soundscapes and Monocle's round-the-clock coverage of everything on the planet. We want to treat your ears as well as we can, and the planet, too. These radios feature a digital amplifier that reduces power consumption but increases the amount of creative power in your own mind.

We’ll be changing stations and sounds on the hot buttons over time. You can keep track of them all hear, just kidding here, and we’ll be posting more about the waves in the air over time right here.

1 : KEXP
Born in Seattle, KEXP is our #1 homie. But we share so much beyond a hometown. Our love of music, discovery and community have made us steadfast friends and long-time collaborators. On the air for over four decades, this tiny radio-station-that-could started as a 10-watt transmitter is located on top of McMahon Hall on the University of Washington campus. It’s since grown to one of the most celebrated and respected independent, community-driven radio stations on the planet. It won a Webby for Best Radio Website when the internet was just a wee baby in 2004, and even opened a branch in New York City, serving all five boroughs. For a few years, we’ve collaborated with KEXP to broadcast live from the lobby at Ace Hotel New York during CMJ, and we’ve made some really good friends along the way.

2 : NTS Radio
With their first radio broadcast just months behind them, London’s NTS was born, in a sort of KEXP reversal, from the blog nutstosoup.com (now laid to rest). NTS aims to fill a void in the community of musically and progressively minded Londoners (and citizens of the world). A unique platform for inspired people to present their findings, passions and obsessions, NTS draws on local wisdom of the young and old in London from label founders to magazine editors to style icons to musical discoverers sailing the rocky seas of basement shows and pirate internet stations and tape deck-only road trips to bring the best and brightest to your ears day and night.

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MusicFest NW rolls around every year when the leaves start to turn. This year, it brings Larry Crane and Jackpot! Recording to the mezzanine at Ace Hotel Portland for a series of live sessions, September 6 and 7 from noon to 4pm.
Lay down some tracks of your own in the recording area on the mezzanine of the hotel, or lurk and listen downstairs while bands record live tracks against the hustle and bustle of the hotel and coffee shop downstairs. Equipment and sound engineering provided by Jackpot!, music provided by whoever emails larry@tapeop.com to set up a recording time. Performances include Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy (Will Oldham of Palace Music), Hutch of The Thermals and Red Fang.

MusicFest NW rolls around every year when the leaves start to turn. This year, it brings Larry Crane and Jackpot! Recording to the mezzanine at Ace Hotel Portland for a series of live sessions, September 6 and 7 from noon to 4pm.

Lay down some tracks of your own in the recording area on the mezzanine of the hotel, or lurk and listen downstairs while bands record live tracks against the hustle and bustle of the hotel and coffee shop downstairs. Equipment and sound engineering provided by Jackpot!, music provided by whoever emails larry@tapeop.com to set up a recording time. Performances include Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy (Will Oldham of Palace Music), Hutch of The Thermals and Red Fang.


Brooklyn’s Bird Courage make their own (see figures above and below for evidence of off-duty making). The trio bring their gracefully crafted ballads and hymnals to Ace New York with a September-long residency at Sunday Night Live, curated by Chris Tucci. With new accompanying guests every weekend including Morgan O’Kane, Meaner Pencil, Streets of Laredo, Ricci Swift (of Gondola) and Wilder Maker, their lobby reign begins tomorrow night.

Brooklyn’s Bird Courage make their own (see figures above and below for evidence of off-duty making). The trio bring their gracefully crafted ballads and hymnals to Ace New York with a September-long residency at Sunday Night Live, curated by Chris Tucci. With new accompanying guests every weekend including Morgan O’Kane, Meaner Pencil, Streets of Laredo, Ricci Swift (of Gondola) and Wilder Maker, their lobby reign begins tomorrow night.


Silence has a lot to tell us. Even the sounds we forget to hear are always narrating the world. Few humans really know how to slow down and tune in as well as the once and future king John Cage, maestro of underdog aural landscapes and forgotten frequencies. His particular magic was a balm, koan and sigh for a natural and unnatural world that does its best, frequently fails and always tells a good story. Born in Los Angeles September 5, 1912, his compositions are being celebrated just in time by the LA-based Society for the Activation of Social Space through Art and Sound (SASSAS) with a series of classes for kids September 3-5, Kids Play Cage, with three foci: What is Music?, Silence and Chance, culminating in a free performance by the students September 8. The class costs nothing and is open to the public —- register your small person as soon as you can, though, and get a spot at the performance.

Silence has a lot to tell us. Even the sounds we forget to hear are always narrating the world. Few humans really know how to slow down and tune in as well as the once and future king John Cage, maestro of underdog aural landscapes and forgotten frequencies. His particular magic was a balm, koan and sigh for a natural and unnatural world that does its best, frequently fails and always tells a good story. Born in Los Angeles September 5, 1912, his compositions are being celebrated just in time by the LA-based Society for the Activation of Social Space through Art and Sound (SASSAS) with a series of classes for kids September 3-5, Kids Play Cage, with three foci: What is Music?, Silence and Chance, culminating in a free performance by the students September 8. The class costs nothing and is open to the public —- register your small person as soon as you can, though, and get a spot at the performance.


Just a few…… We met this gentleman, Richard Murrain, on the train yesterday morning.


Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.

Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.


I’VE GOT A HOLE IN MY SOUL : BEYONDADOUBTRON BUFORD & URAL THOMAS : DEEP SOUL PT. I
About ten years ago, there was a very well put together woman selling a few 45s out of a plastic bag on street in Portland. She said they had been her father’s but that she had no turntable. She only wanted what seemed like a few bucks for the whole tattered bodega bag. In it I found some of Seattle’s holy grail, hard soul gems, namely, both Ron Buford on Camelot.
The singer on the stand-out track is Ural Thomas, who she said still lived in the neighborhood. Deep Soul Part 1 is still one of the greatest, high-energy tracks of the era, and to our amazement Ural Thomas is still performing it around PDX. This Saturday he’s headlining Downtown at Star Theater and the platters will be turned with the assistance of me, Danny Dodge (No Tomorrow Boys) and DJ HWY7. And I’ll be getting my record signed at long last.

This is the second chapter in our new rare vinyl series with Beyondadoubt, a Portland-based producer, beatmaker, DJ and collector.

I’VE GOT A HOLE IN MY SOUL : BEYONDADOUBT
RON BUFORD & URAL THOMAS : DEEP SOUL PT. I

About ten years ago, there was a very well put together woman selling a few 45s out of a plastic bag on street in Portland. She said they had been her father’s but that she had no turntable. She only wanted what seemed like a few bucks for the whole tattered bodega bag. In it I found some of Seattle’s holy grail, hard soul gems, namely, both Ron Buford on Camelot.

The singer on the stand-out track is Ural Thomas, who she said still lived in the neighborhood. Deep Soul Part 1 is still one of the greatest, high-energy tracks of the era, and to our amazement Ural Thomas is still performing it around PDX. This Saturday he’s headlining Downtown at Star Theater and the platters will be turned with the assistance of me, Danny Dodge (No Tomorrow Boys) and DJ HWY7. And I’ll be getting my record signed at long last.

This is the second chapter in our new rare vinyl series with Beyondadoubt, a Portland-based producer, beatmaker, DJ and collector.


Sexiest man of the year and friend to animals Chris Johanson is also an artist. Meet him and some friends to celebrate his new Phaidon Contemporary Artists’ Monograph at Monograph Bookwerks on Alberta in Northeast Portland tonight. Chris says: “Jonathan Raymond the Portland writer who is a contributor to the book will be there. Sun Foot will play 3 songs. And we are going to have a really good time.” You can see all the details on Monograph’s blog.

Sexiest man of the year and friend to animals Chris Johanson is also an artist. Meet him and some friends to celebrate his new Phaidon Contemporary Artists’ Monograph at Monograph Bookwerks on Alberta in Northeast Portland tonight. Chris says: “Jonathan Raymond the Portland writer who is a contributor to the book will be there. Sun Foot will play 3 songs. And we are going to have a really good time.” You can see all the details on Monograph’s blog.


Later this afternoon, the sixth annual Doe Bay Festival kicks off. One of the Pacific Northwest’s best-kept secrets, less than a thousand tickets to this damn-near-perfect little gathering sell out in a few short minutes each year. Just a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our front door in Seattle (or a quick drive, a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our home in Portland), we can almost see it from here. And to the lucky souls chugging westward across the water to Orcas Island today, we wish you the best of times— and the best of luck next year. We’re officially in the competition for a couple of those tickets, and we’re not afraid to throw an elbow or two.
Photo by Jason Neuerburg.

Later this afternoon, the sixth annual Doe Bay Festival kicks off. One of the Pacific Northwest’s best-kept secrets, less than a thousand tickets to this damn-near-perfect little gathering sell out in a few short minutes each year. Just a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our front door in Seattle (or a quick drive, a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our home in Portland), we can almost see it from here. And to the lucky souls chugging westward across the water to Orcas Island today, we wish you the best of times— and the best of luck next year. We’re officially in the competition for a couple of those tickets, and we’re not afraid to throw an elbow or two.

Photo by Jason Neuerburg.


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