I’VE GOT A HOLE IN MY SOUL : BEYONDADOUBT
BOBBY “BLUE” BLAND, RIP 23 JUNE 2013

Bobby Blue Bland was one of the great great great voices to come out of Memphis, Tennessee. My favorite quote from his interview with my friend Andria Lisle for Mojo Magazine: “The things I did have staying power. There’s a certain way you say ‘baby.’ You don’t just say it – you have to make somebody feel it.”

My first introduction to Bobby Blue Bland was a high priced LP on the wall of a Memphis record store where I worked for several years. At $100 it was far out of my price range. When I moved to Portland years ago and helped open a new record shop on Mississippi Street, I found a copy of the original 1961 album “Two Steps From The Blues” in the dollar bin. It has since remained one of my favorite long-players of all time — beautiful and haunting. Bobby goes from blues to soul to big band without ever losing genuineness.

Last night, hearing of his death, I lit a candle & listened in the dark. Tonight I would recommend you do the same.

Bobby Blue Bland

The first in our new rare vinyl feature with Beyondadoubt. Keep an eye out for new installations.


He who learns must sufferAnd even in our sleep pain that cannot forgetFalls drop by drop upon the heart,And in our own despite, against our will,Comes wisdom to us by the awful grace of God.
Robert F. Kennedy recited his version of this Aeschylus poem April 4, 1968 at his announcement of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. that evening at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. King was in Memphis to generate empowerment and involvement among poor people of all races, and to demand of the US government a transfer from military spending to human services for the poor. The Poor People’s Campaign was his most controversial to date, and after his assassination, support poured in from around the country. The action commenced this day in 1968 with his organizers in the “King-Abernathy” suite at the Lorraine Motel where King was slain, and in Washington DC.
Five years earlier on May 2, 1963, African American children marched independently in Birmingham, Alabama to protest segregation. Some were as young as six. They were set upon by white police officers and adult citizens with fire hoses, dogs, and batons. They returned each day to march. Their movement became known as The Children’s Crusade. King was jailed in the city less than a month prior, during which time he had written his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” He referred to these protesters as “the disinherited children of God.”
You can visit the Lorraine Motel in Memphis — it is now called the National Civil Rights Museum. A full renovation and strengthening of the museum will be unveiled in summer 2014.

He who learns must suffer
And even in our sleep pain that cannot forget
Falls drop by drop upon the heart,
And in our own despite, against our will,
Comes wisdom to us by the awful grace of God.

Robert F. Kennedy recited his version of this Aeschylus poem April 4, 1968 at his announcement of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. that evening at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. King was in Memphis to generate empowerment and involvement among poor people of all races, and to demand of the US government a transfer from military spending to human services for the poor. The Poor People’s Campaign was his most controversial to date, and after his assassination, support poured in from around the country. The action commenced this day in 1968 with his organizers in the “King-Abernathy” suite at the Lorraine Motel where King was slain, and in Washington DC.

Five years earlier on May 2, 1963, African American children marched independently in Birmingham, Alabama to protest segregation. Some were as young as six. They were set upon by white police officers and adult citizens with fire hoses, dogs, and batons. They returned each day to march. Their movement became known as The Children’s Crusade. King was jailed in the city less than a month prior, during which time he had written his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” He referred to these protesters as “the disinherited children of God.”

You can visit the Lorraine Motel in Memphis — it is now called the National Civil Rights Museum. A full renovation and strengthening of the museum will be unveiled in summer 2014.


A lot of people think places like Detroit and Memphis are lost — that the radical openness and innocence and obsessiveness that flourished there can’t exist next to the internet, MP3s and — well, and crack. In 1960s Detroit, you could walk from the Brewster-Douglass Projects to Fortune and cut a record after school. Wendy Rene cruised in the door at Stax in 1964 and just sang a song that changed everything. In some ways, the internet and the digitization of music have allowed this same level access, but most of us will agree there’s some soul lost there… Why are real records important in this light? What likeness does holding a 45 bear to holding a real book? Why does it matter to touch and smell and hear something real?
Jack White is a crooner, a picker, an upholsterer, co-founder of Third Man Records and 2013’s Official Record Store Day Ambassador. In honor of the occasion, we’re hosting Third Man in Palm Springs at Ace Hotel & Swim Club during Desert Gold — they’re popping-up in the Clubhouse with the one and only currently functioning record shop in Palm Springs. It matters a lot to us. Third Man is really good at this shit. We can’t explain the ineffable importance of vinyl, of paper and ink, and of real people instead of Twitter handles. But come hang out with us today and we can just not explain it together. Bring your record bag.

A lot of people think places like Detroit and Memphis are lost — that the radical openness and innocence and obsessiveness that flourished there can’t exist next to the internet, MP3s and — well, and crack. In 1960s Detroit, you could walk from the Brewster-Douglass Projects to Fortune and cut a record after school. Wendy Rene cruised in the door at Stax in 1964 and just sang a song that changed everything. In some ways, the internet and the digitization of music have allowed this same level access, but most of us will agree there’s some soul lost there… Why are real records important in this light? What likeness does holding a 45 bear to holding a real book? Why does it matter to touch and smell and hear something real?

Jack White is a crooner, a picker, an upholsterer, co-founder of Third Man Records and 2013’s Official Record Store Day Ambassador. In honor of the occasion, we’re hosting Third Man in Palm Springs at Ace Hotel & Swim Club during Desert Gold — they’re popping-up in the Clubhouse with the one and only currently functioning record shop in Palm Springs. It matters a lot to us. Third Man is really good at this shit. We can’t explain the ineffable importance of vinyl, of paper and ink, and of real people instead of Twitter handles. But come hang out with us today and we can just not explain it together. Bring your record bag.


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