With the dough it takes to make one of the rehashed gazillion dollar shoot ‘em ups that flopped at the box office this summer (it was nicer outside anyway), Gregg Araki could theoretically make Three Bewildered People In The Night several thousand times, even if you adjust for 1987 money. As it turns out once was enough. His no-budget portrait of three West Village artists was as refreshingly open in its fluid sexuality as claustrophobically confined by its murky lighting and landscapes. The film slow-launched Araki to a pioneer role in the New Queer Cinema. And though his films probably cost more now than a single sequence of a muscle car exploding in flames, he still keeps it weird and candidly queer. The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) is screening a retrospective of Araki’s career that kicks off [next] Thursday and Friday, respectively, with The Living End and Three Bewildered People In The Night. On September 28, Araki his bad self will lead an intimate master class. We’ll be partnering with MAD to curate some music and other happenings at Ace Hotel New York soon. More on that later. 

With the dough it takes to make one of the rehashed gazillion dollar shoot ‘em ups that flopped at the box office this summer (it was nicer outside anyway), Gregg Araki could theoretically make Three Bewildered People In The Night several thousand times, even if you adjust for 1987 money. As it turns out once was enough. His no-budget portrait of three West Village artists was as refreshingly open in its fluid sexuality as claustrophobically confined by its murky lighting and landscapes. The film slow-launched Araki to a pioneer role in the New Queer Cinema. And though his films probably cost more now than a single sequence of a muscle car exploding in flames, he still keeps it weird and candidly queer. The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) is screening a retrospective of Araki’s career that kicks off [next] Thursday and Friday, respectively, with The Living End and Three Bewildered People In The Night. On September 28, Araki his bad self will lead an intimate master class. We’ll be partnering with MAD to curate some music and other happenings at Ace Hotel New York soon. More on that later. 


After the Museum: The Home Front 2013 at New York’s Museum of Arts & Design brings together new works by more than thirty designers and collaboratives from the US to examine the interplay between cultural institutions and the design community, and propose forward-looking approaches to the post-millennial museum. The exhibition encourages audiences to reconsider traditional notions surrounding the structure and role of a design museum through a series of installations, digital initiatives, lectures, and publications. 
Interdisciplinary in scope, works will include Project Projects’ experimentation with prototyping art collections from major museums to democratize the acquisition of masterworks; The LAB at Rockwell Group’s software toolkit for choreographing interactive spaces; and Aaron Anderson and Eric Timothy Carlson’s installation of the museum director’s office chair in the gallery space. Each element of After the Museum examines the dynamic relationship between design and the museum experience, highlighting its influence on product development, information sharing, and interactive programming.   
On view through this Sunday, June 9.

After the Museum: The Home Front 2013 at New York’s Museum of Arts & Design brings together new works by more than thirty designers and collaboratives from the US to examine the interplay between cultural institutions and the design community, and propose forward-looking approaches to the post-millennial museum. The exhibition encourages audiences to reconsider traditional notions surrounding the structure and role of a design museum through a series of installations, digital initiatives, lectures, and publications. 

Interdisciplinary in scope, works will include Project Projects’ experimentation with prototyping art collections from major museums to democratize the acquisition of masterworks; The LAB at Rockwell Group’s software toolkit for choreographing interactive spaces; and Aaron Anderson and Eric Timothy Carlson’s installation of the museum director’s office chair in the gallery space. Each element of After the Museum examines the dynamic relationship between design and the museum experience, highlighting its influence on product development, information sharing, and interactive programming.   

On view through this Sunday, June 9.


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