MusicFest NW rolls around every year when the leaves start to turn. This year, it brings Larry Crane and Jackpot! Recording to the mezzanine at Ace Hotel Portland for a series of live sessions, September 6 and 7 from noon to 4pm.
Lay down some tracks of your own in the recording area on the mezzanine of the hotel, or lurk and listen downstairs while bands record live tracks against the hustle and bustle of the hotel and coffee shop downstairs. Equipment and sound engineering provided by Jackpot!, music provided by whoever emails larry@tapeop.com to set up a recording time. Performances include Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy (Will Oldham of Palace Music), Hutch of The Thermals and Red Fang.

MusicFest NW rolls around every year when the leaves start to turn. This year, it brings Larry Crane and Jackpot! Recording to the mezzanine at Ace Hotel Portland for a series of live sessions, September 6 and 7 from noon to 4pm.

Lay down some tracks of your own in the recording area on the mezzanine of the hotel, or lurk and listen downstairs while bands record live tracks against the hustle and bustle of the hotel and coffee shop downstairs. Equipment and sound engineering provided by Jackpot!, music provided by whoever emails larry@tapeop.com to set up a recording time. Performances include Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy (Will Oldham of Palace Music), Hutch of The Thermals and Red Fang.


Brooklyn’s Bird Courage make their own (see figures above and below for evidence of off-duty making). The trio bring their gracefully crafted ballads and hymnals to Ace New York with a September-long residency at Sunday Night Live, curated by Chris Tucci. With new accompanying guests every weekend including Morgan O’Kane, Meaner Pencil, Streets of Laredo, Ricci Swift (of Gondola) and Wilder Maker, their lobby reign begins tomorrow night.

Brooklyn’s Bird Courage make their own (see figures above and below for evidence of off-duty making). The trio bring their gracefully crafted ballads and hymnals to Ace New York with a September-long residency at Sunday Night Live, curated by Chris Tucci. With new accompanying guests every weekend including Morgan O’Kane, Meaner Pencil, Streets of Laredo, Ricci Swift (of Gondola) and Wilder Maker, their lobby reign begins tomorrow night.


Silence has a lot to tell us. Even the sounds we forget to hear are always narrating the world. Few humans really know how to slow down and tune in as well as the once and future king John Cage, maestro of underdog aural landscapes and forgotten frequencies. His particular magic was a balm, koan and sigh for a natural and unnatural world that does its best, frequently fails and always tells a good story. Born in Los Angeles September 5, 1912, his compositions are being celebrated just in time by the LA-based Society for the Activation of Social Space through Art and Sound (SASSAS) with a series of classes for kids September 3-5, Kids Play Cage, with three foci: What is Music?, Silence and Chance, culminating in a free performance by the students September 8. The class costs nothing and is open to the public —- register your small person as soon as you can, though, and get a spot at the performance.

Silence has a lot to tell us. Even the sounds we forget to hear are always narrating the world. Few humans really know how to slow down and tune in as well as the once and future king John Cage, maestro of underdog aural landscapes and forgotten frequencies. His particular magic was a balm, koan and sigh for a natural and unnatural world that does its best, frequently fails and always tells a good story. Born in Los Angeles September 5, 1912, his compositions are being celebrated just in time by the LA-based Society for the Activation of Social Space through Art and Sound (SASSAS) with a series of classes for kids September 3-5, Kids Play Cage, with three foci: What is Music?, Silence and Chance, culminating in a free performance by the students September 8. The class costs nothing and is open to the public —- register your small person as soon as you can, though, and get a spot at the performance.


Just a few…… We met this gentleman, Richard Murrain, on the train yesterday morning.


Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.

Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.


I’VE GOT A HOLE IN MY SOUL : BEYONDADOUBTRON BUFORD & URAL THOMAS : DEEP SOUL PT. I
About ten years ago, there was a very well put together woman selling a few 45s out of a plastic bag on street in Portland. She said they had been her father’s but that she had no turntable. She only wanted what seemed like a few bucks for the whole tattered bodega bag. In it I found some of Seattle’s holy grail, hard soul gems, namely, both Ron Buford on Camelot.
The singer on the stand-out track is Ural Thomas, who she said still lived in the neighborhood. Deep Soul Part 1 is still one of the greatest, high-energy tracks of the era, and to our amazement Ural Thomas is still performing it around PDX. This Saturday he’s headlining Downtown at Star Theater and the platters will be turned with the assistance of me, Danny Dodge (No Tomorrow Boys) and DJ HWY7. And I’ll be getting my record signed at long last.

This is the second chapter in our new rare vinyl series with Beyondadoubt, a Portland-based producer, beatmaker, DJ and collector.

I’VE GOT A HOLE IN MY SOUL : BEYONDADOUBT
RON BUFORD & URAL THOMAS : DEEP SOUL PT. I

About ten years ago, there was a very well put together woman selling a few 45s out of a plastic bag on street in Portland. She said they had been her father’s but that she had no turntable. She only wanted what seemed like a few bucks for the whole tattered bodega bag. In it I found some of Seattle’s holy grail, hard soul gems, namely, both Ron Buford on Camelot.

The singer on the stand-out track is Ural Thomas, who she said still lived in the neighborhood. Deep Soul Part 1 is still one of the greatest, high-energy tracks of the era, and to our amazement Ural Thomas is still performing it around PDX. This Saturday he’s headlining Downtown at Star Theater and the platters will be turned with the assistance of me, Danny Dodge (No Tomorrow Boys) and DJ HWY7. And I’ll be getting my record signed at long last.

This is the second chapter in our new rare vinyl series with Beyondadoubt, a Portland-based producer, beatmaker, DJ and collector.


Sexiest man of the year and friend to animals Chris Johanson is also an artist. Meet him and some friends to celebrate his new Phaidon Contemporary Artists’ Monograph at Monograph Bookwerks on Alberta in Northeast Portland tonight. Chris says: “Jonathan Raymond the Portland writer who is a contributor to the book will be there. Sun Foot will play 3 songs. And we are going to have a really good time.” You can see all the details on Monograph’s blog.

Sexiest man of the year and friend to animals Chris Johanson is also an artist. Meet him and some friends to celebrate his new Phaidon Contemporary Artists’ Monograph at Monograph Bookwerks on Alberta in Northeast Portland tonight. Chris says: “Jonathan Raymond the Portland writer who is a contributor to the book will be there. Sun Foot will play 3 songs. And we are going to have a really good time.” You can see all the details on Monograph’s blog.


Later this afternoon, the sixth annual Doe Bay Festival kicks off. One of the Pacific Northwest’s best-kept secrets, less than a thousand tickets to this damn-near-perfect little gathering sell out in a few short minutes each year. Just a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our front door in Seattle (or a quick drive, a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our home in Portland), we can almost see it from here. And to the lucky souls chugging westward across the water to Orcas Island today, we wish you the best of times— and the best of luck next year. We’re officially in the competition for a couple of those tickets, and we’re not afraid to throw an elbow or two.
Photo by Jason Neuerburg.

Later this afternoon, the sixth annual Doe Bay Festival kicks off. One of the Pacific Northwest’s best-kept secrets, less than a thousand tickets to this damn-near-perfect little gathering sell out in a few short minutes each year. Just a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our front door in Seattle (or a quick drive, a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our home in Portland), we can almost see it from here. And to the lucky souls chugging westward across the water to Orcas Island today, we wish you the best of times— and the best of luck next year. We’re officially in the competition for a couple of those tickets, and we’re not afraid to throw an elbow or two.

Photo by Jason Neuerburg.


MisterWives brings their human pyramid game and a song or two to 5 At 5 this coming Tuesday July 30 in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York, presented by Martin Guitar and Bowery Presents. Catch them on their way to indie-big and lose yourself in their vibes, 5pm Tuesday.
Photo by Matthew Phillips.

MisterWives brings their human pyramid game and a song or two to 5 At 5 this coming Tuesday July 30 in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York, presented by Martin Guitar and Bowery Presents. Catch them on their way to indie-big and lose yourself in their vibes, 5pm Tuesday.

Photo by Matthew Phillips.


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