From the New York Public Library, a stereoscope of the Fireman’s Parade on Labor Day, 1887 in Union Square. The first Labor Day celebration in New York took place in the square 5 years earlier when a parade of more than 10,000 workers marched up Broadway and past a reviewing stand in Union Square. Not only is it the last day you can tastefully wear white or seersucker (but we don’t care), but Labor Day gives us occasion to honor the contributions to American labor rights and culture by slaves, indentured servants, union activists, women in the workplace, migrant workers and everybody who’s driven a nail into our tallest buildings and soundest bungalows. Labor Day in stereoscope aptly reminds us of the many versions of truth, justice and liberty (and eight hours for what they will) inherent in our national, and now multi-national, dialogue about labor. Remember not to step on anyone’s head on the way up, and always remember where you come from. And enjoy your weekend, courtesy of the labor movement.

From the New York Public Library, a stereoscope of the Fireman’s Parade on Labor Day, 1887 in Union Square. The first Labor Day celebration in New York took place in the square 5 years earlier when a parade of more than 10,000 workers marched up Broadway and past a reviewing stand in Union Square. Not only is it the last day you can tastefully wear white or seersucker (but we don’t care), but Labor Day gives us occasion to honor the contributions to American labor rights and culture by slaves, indentured servants, union activists, women in the workplace, migrant workers and everybody who’s driven a nail into our tallest buildings and soundest bungalows. Labor Day in stereoscope aptly reminds us of the many versions of truth, justice and liberty (and eight hours for what they will) inherent in our national, and now multi-national, dialogue about labor. Remember not to step on anyone’s head on the way up, and always remember where you come from. And enjoy your weekend, courtesy of the labor movement.


Brooklyn’s Bird Courage make their own (see figures above and below for evidence of off-duty making). The trio bring their gracefully crafted ballads and hymnals to Ace New York with a September-long residency at Sunday Night Live, curated by Chris Tucci. With new accompanying guests every weekend including Morgan O’Kane, Meaner Pencil, Streets of Laredo, Ricci Swift (of Gondola) and Wilder Maker, their lobby reign begins tomorrow night.

Brooklyn’s Bird Courage make their own (see figures above and below for evidence of off-duty making). The trio bring their gracefully crafted ballads and hymnals to Ace New York with a September-long residency at Sunday Night Live, curated by Chris Tucci. With new accompanying guests every weekend including Morgan O’Kane, Meaner Pencil, Streets of Laredo, Ricci Swift (of Gondola) and Wilder Maker, their lobby reign begins tomorrow night.


Ace friend Thomas Callahan is the master builder and founder of Brooklyn’s Horse Cycles. If you’ve stayed with us at Ace New York chances are you’ve cruised the bike-laned blacktop on a steed of his making. He recently Kickstarted his Urban Tour project, a plucky attempt to grow his little corner of the Brooklyn bicycle industry by putting more asses on handbuilt beasts of burden. This Labor Day weekend you can see what Thomas, and a couple dozen other makers, have been up to at Bike Cult, a Hand-Built Bicycle Show at the Warsaw Concert Hall in Williamsburg. It’s something like the Let Me Ride video off The Chronic, but with bikes and more East Coast flavor.

Ace friend Thomas Callahan is the master builder and founder of Brooklyn’s Horse Cycles. If you’ve stayed with us at Ace New York chances are you’ve cruised the bike-laned blacktop on a steed of his making. He recently Kickstarted his Urban Tour project, a plucky attempt to grow his little corner of the Brooklyn bicycle industry by putting more asses on handbuilt beasts of burden. This Labor Day weekend you can see what Thomas, and a couple dozen other makers, have been up to at Bike Cult, a Hand-Built Bicycle Show at the Warsaw Concert Hall in Williamsburg. It’s something like the Let Me Ride video off The Chronic, but with bikes and more East Coast flavor.


A few rough-and-tumble coding gangs from our Clinton Health Initiative code-a-thon with Tumblr at Ace Hotel New York. FastCo. confetti’ed us, and Chelsea released balloons.

A few rough-and-tumble coding gangs from our Clinton Health Initiative code-a-thon with Tumblr at Ace Hotel New York. FastCo. confetti’ed us, and Chelsea released balloons.


Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.

Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.




Brooklyn photographer Brian Vu made these photos. His brother Chris helped with the last one.

Brooklyn photographer Brian Vu made these photos. His brother Chris helped with the last one.


Brice Marden from Karma BooksSolomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 19757.5 x 8.5 inches (19.2 x 21.5 cm)

Brice Marden from Karma Books
Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 1975
7.5 x 8.5 inches (19.2 x 21.5 cm)

Cite Arrow via karmakarmanyc

WARM UP INTERVIEW : TWO QUESTIONS FOR KELELA
Fade to Mind’s Kelela performed with Kingdom and Gas Lamp Killer at Ace Hotel Palm Springs during this year’s Desert Gold — where she ended up on a poolside circle bed serenading a man in shades with “Bank Head.” This weekend, she’s wooing the crowd at MoMA PS1’s 2013 Warm Up in Queens, NY. Must be her magic hands. If you’d like to try your magic hands at a pair of tickets to this weekend’s Warm Up, you can enter our contest. And by all means, go down an internet rabbit hole about Kelela — she’s a bright comet.
What’s been inspiring you lately?
Girl Unit.
What three pieces of equipment could you not live without?
My iMac, voice note feature in my phone, and my VoiceLive Touch.

WARM UP INTERVIEW : TWO QUESTIONS FOR KELELA

Fade to Mind’s Kelela performed with Kingdom and Gas Lamp Killer at Ace Hotel Palm Springs during this year’s Desert Gold — where she ended up on a poolside circle bed serenading a man in shades with “Bank Head.” This weekend, she’s wooing the crowd at MoMA PS1’s 2013 Warm Up in Queens, NY. Must be her magic hands. If you’d like to try your magic hands at a pair of tickets to this weekend’s Warm Up, you can enter our contest. And by all means, go down an internet rabbit hole about Kelela — she’s a bright comet.

What’s been inspiring you lately?

Girl Unit.

What three pieces of equipment could you not live without?

My iMac, voice note feature in my phone, and my VoiceLive Touch.


“There were many patients in these asylums who were probably not unlike friends you and I have now.”
Time capsules in the form of forgotten suitcases from the Willard Asylum for the Chronic Insane in New York State from 1910 to 1960, photographed by Jon Crispin. The mysteries therein illustrate the neglected and essentially denied humanity of many of that era’s (and sadly this era’s) mentally ill. Of course, in the early, mid and even late 20th century, you could be deemed mentally ill if you were gay, politically dissident, a midwife, an herbalist, or just unusual — and who isn’t at least one of those things? For now, their identities are concealed by the state even from living relatives, but we have bobbins and photobooth pictures and guns and pills and bells to which to listen carefully.
You can see more photos and stories about patients at Collector’s Weekly. The full collection is preserved in the New York State Museum's permanent collection, and is currently on view at San Francisco’s Exploratorium through April 2014, in an installation that explores the ‘changing face of normal.’

“There were many patients in these asylums who were probably not unlike friends you and I have now.”

Time capsules in the form of forgotten suitcases from the Willard Asylum for the Chronic Insane in New York State from 1910 to 1960, photographed by Jon Crispin. The mysteries therein illustrate the neglected and essentially denied humanity of many of that era’s (and sadly this era’s) mentally ill. Of course, in the early, mid and even late 20th century, you could be deemed mentally ill if you were gay, politically dissident, a midwife, an herbalist, or just unusual — and who isn’t at least one of those things? For now, their identities are concealed by the state even from living relatives, but we have bobbins and photobooth pictures and guns and pills and bells to which to listen carefully.

You can see more photos and stories about patients at Collector’s Weekly. The full collection is preserved in the New York State Museum's permanent collection, and is currently on view at San Francisco’s Exploratorium through April 2014, in an installation that explores the ‘changing face of normal.’


Ace NYC artist and good pal Timothy Goodman created a project with his partner in crime and good friend Jessica Walsh to address their mutually gnarly dating issues. The project is complete, but you have to wait as long as they did to figure out how it ends up. See a new post daily at 40 Days of Dating.


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