The story and art of Moondog née Louis Thomas Hardin, born in Kansas in 1916, embodies the radical possibilities in the exchange between a person and their environment. “The Viking of 6th Avenue,” just like the streets of the New York where he made his home in boxes, basements and borrowed crannies for three decades, was unexpected, anti-conformist, multicultural and modernist. Often cited as a predecessor to the minimalist movement by fellow New Yorkers Phillip Glass and Steve Reich, he astounded, and continues to inspire awe, by embracing his blindness and deeply rooted idiosyncrasies — composing vocals and song direction in Braille and creating his own instruments from scraps — with nearly unprecedented creative output. This is a man who was true to his inner creative and spiritual compass to the extent that he was entirely unemployable by the capitalist world. Not only is it remarkable that Moondog music is the work of one individual, but also that his songs still read as wildly inventive and inspiring today as they ever were, originating from one very beautiful mind more than six decades ago.

This year marks the 60th anniversary of the release of Moondog and His Friends on Epic, and above is one of our favorite tracks. Godspeed, and to your own brain be true.


One of our favorite dudes in the world, Joe Garvey, painted a new mural in room 1216 at Ace Hotel New York, and then his friend Jonny Baskin took pictures.

One of our favorite dudes in the world, Joe Garvey, painted a new mural in room 1216 at Ace Hotel New York, and then his friend Jonny Baskin took pictures.



Blinky Palermo
"Peter Heisterkamp"Stadtisches Kunstmuseum, Bonn, 198110.5 x 8 inches (26.67 x 20.32 cm)

Blinky Palermo

"Peter Heisterkamp"
Stadtisches Kunstmuseum, Bonn, 1981
10.5 x 8 inches (26.67 x 20.32 cm)

Cite Arrow via karmakarmanyc

Kim Ann Foxman performs this weekend at MoMA PS1 Warm Up 2013 in Queens, NY. Keep an eye out for our interview with Kim — for now, enter to win a pair of passes to Warm Up as quick as you can. They’re gettin’ snapped up.

KIM ANN FOXMAN “CREATURE” from KIM ANN FOXMAN on Vimeo.

Kim Ann Foxman performs this weekend at MoMA PS1 Warm Up 2013 in Queens, NY. Keep an eye out for our interview with Kim — for now, enter to win a pair of passes to Warm Up as quick as you can. They’re gettin’ snapped up.

KIM ANN FOXMAN “CREATURE” from KIM ANN FOXMAN on Vimeo.


The Party Wall at MoMA PS1 weaves together the ‘bones’ and ‘blanks’ —  bi-products of skateboard manufacture, subverting the drab conformism of Big Skateboarding to help people party. CODA, the project’s creators, won this year’s Young Architects’ Program with this post-industrial shade source and slip n’ slide, up at PS1 in the wilds of Long Island City throughout Warm Up season. PS1 comrades stopped by to dress our gallery space at Ace Hotel New York with some party wall paraphernalia — stop by if you’re in the neighborhood.

The Party Wall at MoMA PS1 weaves together the ‘bones’ and ‘blanks’ —  bi-products of skateboard manufacture, subverting the drab conformism of Big Skateboarding to help people party. CODA, the project’s creators, won this year’s Young Architects’ Program with this post-industrial shade source and slip n’ slide, up at PS1 in the wilds of Long Island City throughout Warm Up season. PS1 comrades stopped by to dress our gallery space at Ace Hotel New York with some party wall paraphernalia — stop by if you’re in the neighborhood.


MoMA PS1's annual music Queens, NY music festival Warm Up kicks off this weekend. We’re proud to be a sponsor of this platform for emerging and experimental artists, and we want you to go find out about all your new favorite musicians. As tradition foretells, we’re giving away three pairs of passes every weekend through early September — go get em, tiger.

Photo of PS1 by Nat Ma

MoMA PS1's annual music Queens, NY music festival Warm Up kicks off this weekend. We’re proud to be a sponsor of this platform for emerging and experimental artists, and we want you to go find out about all your new favorite musicians. As tradition foretells, we’re giving away three pairs of passes every weekend through early September — go get em, tiger.

Photo of PS1 by Nat Ma


Ace Hotel New York artist Greg Lamarche created this huge collage-based mural with our other friends at Colossal Media.


Drag sisterhood and performance art collective Chez Deep kick off Pride Weekend in New York with a performance of Common Visions — a ritual drag transformation and live talk show with special guests Domonique Echeverria, Linda Simpson and Mss Vee. A narrative framed within a classical drag revue, Common Visions reaffirms the drag performer as spiritual guide to interpret and celebrate the psycho-spiritual and pop-culture myths that make each of us diverse and divine. 
Chez Deep is the New York City-based drag sisterhood of performers Alexis Blair Penney, Sam Banks, Hari Nef, Colin Self and Bailey Stiles. Common Visions goes down this Friday evening at Ace Hotel New York — RSVP here.

Drag sisterhood and performance art collective Chez Deep kick off Pride Weekend in New York with a performance of Common Visions — a ritual drag transformation and live talk show with special guests Domonique Echeverria, Linda Simpson and Mss VeeA narrative framed within a classical drag revue, Common Visions reaffirms the drag performer as spiritual guide to interpret and celebrate the psycho-spiritual and pop-culture myths that make each of us diverse and divine. 

Chez Deep is the New York City-based drag sisterhood of performers Alexis Blair PenneySam Banks, Hari NefColin Self and Bailey Stiles. Common Visions goes down this Friday evening at Ace Hotel New York — RSVP here.

Chez Deep

Chez Deep


A gifted sculptor, Florida-born Augusta Savage fought poverty, racism and sexism to become a prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance, the period of African-American cultural outpouring in New York City during the 1920s and ’30s. Her extraordinary talent opened many doors that led to her becoming one of the most influential teachers of her time and a strong voice for civil rights for African-Americans.
Born in Florida in 1892, she was the seventh of fourteen children born to Edward and Cornelia Fells. As a child, Fells exhibited a talent and a passion for sculpting small objects using red clay she found in her neighborhood. The habit often got her into trouble with her father, a part-time minister, who regarded his child’s handiwork as “graven images” outlawed by the Bible’s 10 Commandments.
Pictured here, The Harp, Ms. Savage’s legendary sculpture based on Lift Every Voice and Sing by James Weldon Johnson.
Read more about Augusta on this incredible blog about the history of slavery in the US, and watch a stock footage clip of Ms. Savage working in her studio.

A gifted sculptor, Florida-born Augusta Savage fought poverty, racism and sexism to become a prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance, the period of African-American cultural outpouring in New York City during the 1920s and ’30s. Her extraordinary talent opened many doors that led to her becoming one of the most influential teachers of her time and a strong voice for civil rights for African-Americans.

Born in Florida in 1892, she was the seventh of fourteen children born to Edward and Cornelia Fells. As a child, Fells exhibited a talent and a passion for sculpting small objects using red clay she found in her neighborhood. The habit often got her into trouble with her father, a part-time minister, who regarded his child’s handiwork as “graven images” outlawed by the Bible’s 10 Commandments.

Pictured here, The Harp, Ms. Savage’s legendary sculpture based on Lift Every Voice and Sing by James Weldon Johnson.

Read more about Augusta on this incredible blog about the history of slavery in the US, and watch a stock footage clip of Ms. Savage working in her studio.


Water Spray by Weegee, 1940.

Water Spray by Weegee, 1940.


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