Santa Fe rare book shop Photo-Eye is among dozens of jewels gathering at this weekend’s Art Book Fair at PS1 in Queens. Their books light a flame of book greed in our hearts so strong it hurts. This specimen from their shelves, Shuji Terayama’s Photothèque imaginaire, was designed and handbound in Tokyo, 1975, and belly-bound in an original printed obi.
"Playwright, poet, photographer, filmmaker and all-around provacateur Shuji Terayama is one of the most important figures in the Japanese counter-culture of the sixties and seventies. He produced over 200 literary works and over 20 shorts and full-length films as well as untold works of theater with Tenjo Sajiki and others. Like his films, the photomontages in Photothèque imaginaire… are self-consciously experimental, often surreal, and frequently confounding. And, like the Parisian Surrealists of the 1920s and 30s, he was a great fan of Lautréamont’s Les Chants de Maldoror. He vehemently opposed the protection of the status quo and attacked the righteousness of the Japanese family system and any vestiges of nationalism."
Suzanne Feld, Between Two Worlds: Selected Postwar Japanese Films, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Santa Fe rare book shop Photo-Eye is among dozens of jewels gathering at this weekend’s Art Book Fair at PS1 in Queens. Their books light a flame of book greed in our hearts so strong it hurts. This specimen from their shelves, Shuji Terayama’s Photothèque imaginaire, was designed and handbound in Tokyo, 1975, and belly-bound in an original printed obi.

"Playwright, poet, photographer, filmmaker and all-around provacateur Shuji Terayama is one of the most important figures in the Japanese counter-culture of the sixties and seventies. He produced over 200 literary works and over 20 shorts and full-length films as well as untold works of theater with Tenjo Sajiki and others. Like his films, the photomontages in Photothèque imaginaire… are self-consciously experimental, often surreal, and frequently confounding. And, like the Parisian Surrealists of the 1920s and 30s, he was a great fan of Lautréamont’s Les Chants de Maldoror. He vehemently opposed the protection of the status quo and attacked the righteousness of the Japanese family system and any vestiges of nationalism."

Suzanne Feld, Between Two Worlds: Selected Postwar Japanese Films, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art


With the dough it takes to make one of the rehashed gazillion dollar shoot ‘em ups that flopped at the box office this summer (it was nicer outside anyway), Gregg Araki could theoretically make Three Bewildered People In The Night several thousand times, even if you adjust for 1987 money. As it turns out once was enough. His no-budget portrait of three West Village artists was as refreshingly open in its fluid sexuality as claustrophobically confined by its murky lighting and landscapes. The film slow-launched Araki to a pioneer role in the New Queer Cinema. And though his films probably cost more now than a single sequence of a muscle car exploding in flames, he still keeps it weird and candidly queer. The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) is screening a retrospective of Araki’s career that kicks off [next] Thursday and Friday, respectively, with The Living End and Three Bewildered People In The Night. On September 28, Araki his bad self will lead an intimate master class. We’ll be partnering with MAD to curate some music and other happenings at Ace Hotel New York soon. More on that later. 

With the dough it takes to make one of the rehashed gazillion dollar shoot ‘em ups that flopped at the box office this summer (it was nicer outside anyway), Gregg Araki could theoretically make Three Bewildered People In The Night several thousand times, even if you adjust for 1987 money. As it turns out once was enough. His no-budget portrait of three West Village artists was as refreshingly open in its fluid sexuality as claustrophobically confined by its murky lighting and landscapes. The film slow-launched Araki to a pioneer role in the New Queer Cinema. And though his films probably cost more now than a single sequence of a muscle car exploding in flames, he still keeps it weird and candidly queer. The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) is screening a retrospective of Araki’s career that kicks off [next] Thursday and Friday, respectively, with The Living End and Three Bewildered People In The Night. On September 28, Araki his bad self will lead an intimate master class. We’ll be partnering with MAD to curate some music and other happenings at Ace Hotel New York soon. More on that later. 


Interior. Leather Bar. opens Saturday at the Film Society of Lincoln Center as part of NewFest: The NYC LGBT Film Festival. The new film by James Franco and Travis Mathews is inspired by the ‘lost’ (or legendary) 40 minutes of the infamous 1980 leather exploitation film Cruising, starring Al Pacino, a film that captures what the New York Times today called the “eroticized outlaw mystique” of an era in queer culture.

Interior. Leather Bar. opens Saturday at the Film Society of Lincoln Center as part of NewFest: The NYC LGBT Film Festival. The new film by James Franco and Travis Mathews is inspired by the ‘lost’ (or legendary) 40 minutes of the infamous 1980 leather exploitation film Cruising, starring Al Pacino, a film that captures what the New York Times today called the “eroticized outlaw mystique” of an era in queer culture.


From the New York Public Library, a stereoscope of the Fireman’s Parade on Labor Day, 1887 in Union Square. The first Labor Day celebration in New York took place in the square 5 years earlier when a parade of more than 10,000 workers marched up Broadway and past a reviewing stand in Union Square. Not only is it the last day you can tastefully wear white or seersucker (but we don’t care), but Labor Day gives us occasion to honor the contributions to American labor rights and culture by slaves, indentured servants, union activists, women in the workplace, migrant workers and everybody who’s driven a nail into our tallest buildings and soundest bungalows. Labor Day in stereoscope aptly reminds us of the many versions of truth, justice and liberty (and eight hours for what they will) inherent in our national, and now multi-national, dialogue about labor. Remember not to step on anyone’s head on the way up, and always remember where you come from. And enjoy your weekend, courtesy of the labor movement.

From the New York Public Library, a stereoscope of the Fireman’s Parade on Labor Day, 1887 in Union Square. The first Labor Day celebration in New York took place in the square 5 years earlier when a parade of more than 10,000 workers marched up Broadway and past a reviewing stand in Union Square. Not only is it the last day you can tastefully wear white or seersucker (but we don’t care), but Labor Day gives us occasion to honor the contributions to American labor rights and culture by slaves, indentured servants, union activists, women in the workplace, migrant workers and everybody who’s driven a nail into our tallest buildings and soundest bungalows. Labor Day in stereoscope aptly reminds us of the many versions of truth, justice and liberty (and eight hours for what they will) inherent in our national, and now multi-national, dialogue about labor. Remember not to step on anyone’s head on the way up, and always remember where you come from. And enjoy your weekend, courtesy of the labor movement.


Brooklyn’s Bird Courage make their own (see figures above and below for evidence of off-duty making). The trio bring their gracefully crafted ballads and hymnals to Ace New York with a September-long residency at Sunday Night Live, curated by Chris Tucci. With new accompanying guests every weekend including Morgan O’Kane, Meaner Pencil, Streets of Laredo, Ricci Swift (of Gondola) and Wilder Maker, their lobby reign begins tomorrow night.

Brooklyn’s Bird Courage make their own (see figures above and below for evidence of off-duty making). The trio bring their gracefully crafted ballads and hymnals to Ace New York with a September-long residency at Sunday Night Live, curated by Chris Tucci. With new accompanying guests every weekend including Morgan O’Kane, Meaner Pencil, Streets of Laredo, Ricci Swift (of Gondola) and Wilder Maker, their lobby reign begins tomorrow night.


Ace friend Thomas Callahan is the master builder and founder of Brooklyn’s Horse Cycles. If you’ve stayed with us at Ace New York chances are you’ve cruised the bike-laned blacktop on a steed of his making. He recently Kickstarted his Urban Tour project, a plucky attempt to grow his little corner of the Brooklyn bicycle industry by putting more asses on handbuilt beasts of burden. This Labor Day weekend you can see what Thomas, and a couple dozen other makers, have been up to at Bike Cult, a Hand-Built Bicycle Show at the Warsaw Concert Hall in Williamsburg. It’s something like the Let Me Ride video off The Chronic, but with bikes and more East Coast flavor.

Ace friend Thomas Callahan is the master builder and founder of Brooklyn’s Horse Cycles. If you’ve stayed with us at Ace New York chances are you’ve cruised the bike-laned blacktop on a steed of his making. He recently Kickstarted his Urban Tour project, a plucky attempt to grow his little corner of the Brooklyn bicycle industry by putting more asses on handbuilt beasts of burden. This Labor Day weekend you can see what Thomas, and a couple dozen other makers, have been up to at Bike Cult, a Hand-Built Bicycle Show at the Warsaw Concert Hall in Williamsburg. It’s something like the Let Me Ride video off The Chronic, but with bikes and more East Coast flavor.


A few rough-and-tumble coding gangs from our Clinton Health Initiative code-a-thon with Tumblr at Ace Hotel New York. FastCo. confetti’ed us, and Chelsea released balloons.

A few rough-and-tumble coding gangs from our Clinton Health Initiative code-a-thon with Tumblr at Ace Hotel New York. FastCo. confetti’ed us, and Chelsea released balloons.


Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.

Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.


Faythe Levine and Sam Macon set out to document the diminished but resurgent craft of hand-painted sign making in The Sign Painters. The documentary’s New York premier, tomorrow and Thursday night at Nitehawk Cinema, is sold out. But New Yorkers can meet the authors and scoop a signed copy of the book tonight at Strand. In its pages you’ll meet the unsung artists who hand-lettered the American landscape, like Clark Byers. His “See Rock City” on the roofs of myriad barns throughout the Southeast is familiar to anyone who hails from or has traveled through the region. Or Ernie Gosnell, who was tutored in the trade by a lady wrestler who “tattooed a little bit on the side,” before lugging his brushes from Atlanta to Seattle, ladeling lovin’ spoonfuls of alphabet soup along the way. 




Brooklyn photographer Brian Vu made these photos. His brother Chris helped with the last one.

Brooklyn photographer Brian Vu made these photos. His brother Chris helped with the last one.


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