Brooklyn’s Bird Courage make their own (see figures above and below for evidence of off-duty making). The trio bring their gracefully crafted ballads and hymnals to Ace New York with a September-long residency at Sunday Night Live, curated by Chris Tucci. With new accompanying guests every weekend including Morgan O’Kane, Meaner Pencil, Streets of Laredo, Ricci Swift (of Gondola) and Wilder Maker, their lobby reign begins tomorrow night.

Brooklyn’s Bird Courage make their own (see figures above and below for evidence of off-duty making). The trio bring their gracefully crafted ballads and hymnals to Ace New York with a September-long residency at Sunday Night Live, curated by Chris Tucci. With new accompanying guests every weekend including Morgan O’Kane, Meaner Pencil, Streets of Laredo, Ricci Swift (of Gondola) and Wilder Maker, their lobby reign begins tomorrow night.


Ace friend Thomas Callahan is the master builder and founder of Brooklyn’s Horse Cycles. If you’ve stayed with us at Ace New York chances are you’ve cruised the bike-laned blacktop on a steed of his making. He recently Kickstarted his Urban Tour project, a plucky attempt to grow his little corner of the Brooklyn bicycle industry by putting more asses on handbuilt beasts of burden. This Labor Day weekend you can see what Thomas, and a couple dozen other makers, have been up to at Bike Cult, a Hand-Built Bicycle Show at the Warsaw Concert Hall in Williamsburg. It’s something like the Let Me Ride video off The Chronic, but with bikes and more East Coast flavor.

Ace friend Thomas Callahan is the master builder and founder of Brooklyn’s Horse Cycles. If you’ve stayed with us at Ace New York chances are you’ve cruised the bike-laned blacktop on a steed of his making. He recently Kickstarted his Urban Tour project, a plucky attempt to grow his little corner of the Brooklyn bicycle industry by putting more asses on handbuilt beasts of burden. This Labor Day weekend you can see what Thomas, and a couple dozen other makers, have been up to at Bike Cult, a Hand-Built Bicycle Show at the Warsaw Concert Hall in Williamsburg. It’s something like the Let Me Ride video off The Chronic, but with bikes and more East Coast flavor.


A few rough-and-tumble coding gangs from our Clinton Health Initiative code-a-thon with Tumblr at Ace Hotel New York. FastCo. confetti’ed us, and Chelsea released balloons.

A few rough-and-tumble coding gangs from our Clinton Health Initiative code-a-thon with Tumblr at Ace Hotel New York. FastCo. confetti’ed us, and Chelsea released balloons.


Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.

Thirty years ago Wild Style gave a world stage to New York City’s burgeoning hip hop culture while deftly skating the chasm between its subject — young graffiti writers, break dancers, MCs and DJs making something from nothing — and the Manhattan elite that had begun to take notice. So much has happened since. Hip hop would soon bypass the cultural elite with no regard to established rules of etiquette and make its appeal direct to youth worldwide. The graffiti styles documented in Wild Style inspired a generation of street artists who have now thoroughly infiltrated the overground art world. Stateside, hip hop eventually surpassed country as the number one music-of-choice for working and middle class America, and continues to thrive in the post-record sales music business. And though the Manhattan elite has to some extent re-established its dominance as an arbiter of culture, young hip hop artists from the Bronx to Meridian still insist on ignoring its conventions. NYC Parks SummerStage is celebrating the 30th anniversary of Wild Style Monday with a free outdoor screening at the East River Bandshell with live performances by Chief Rocker Busy Bee, Grand Wizard Theodore, the Cold Crush Brothers and Rodney C, and appearances by director Charlie Ahearn and stars Fab 5 Freddy, Lady Pink, Lee Quinones and Patti Astor.


Faythe Levine and Sam Macon set out to document the diminished but resurgent craft of hand-painted sign making in The Sign Painters. The documentary’s New York premier, tomorrow and Thursday night at Nitehawk Cinema, is sold out. But New Yorkers can meet the authors and scoop a signed copy of the book tonight at Strand. In its pages you’ll meet the unsung artists who hand-lettered the American landscape, like Clark Byers. His “See Rock City” on the roofs of myriad barns throughout the Southeast is familiar to anyone who hails from or has traveled through the region. Or Ernie Gosnell, who was tutored in the trade by a lady wrestler who “tattooed a little bit on the side,” before lugging his brushes from Atlanta to Seattle, ladeling lovin’ spoonfuls of alphabet soup along the way. 




Brooklyn photographer Brian Vu made these photos. His brother Chris helped with the last one.

Brooklyn photographer Brian Vu made these photos. His brother Chris helped with the last one.


Because travel is a question. Courtesy of Niko Skourtis, Jesse Reed and Hamish Smyth, who have archived online the entire New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual designed in 1970 by Massimo Vignelli. 

Because travel is a question. Courtesy of Niko Skourtis, Jesse Reed and Hamish Smyth, who have archived online the entire New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual designed in 1970 by Massimo Vignelli. 


MisterWives brings their human pyramid game and a song or two to 5 At 5 this coming Tuesday July 30 in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York, presented by Martin Guitar and Bowery Presents. Catch them on their way to indie-big and lose yourself in their vibes, 5pm Tuesday.
Photo by Matthew Phillips.

MisterWives brings their human pyramid game and a song or two to 5 At 5 this coming Tuesday July 30 in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York, presented by Martin Guitar and Bowery Presents. Catch them on their way to indie-big and lose yourself in their vibes, 5pm Tuesday.

Photo by Matthew Phillips.


Brice Marden from Karma BooksSolomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 19757.5 x 8.5 inches (19.2 x 21.5 cm)

Brice Marden from Karma Books
Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 1975
7.5 x 8.5 inches (19.2 x 21.5 cm)

Cite Arrow via karmakarmanyc

LONDON // NEW YORK
Pond-hopping street art bible VNA is celebrating the release of their 23rd issue with limited edition screenprinted versions by the omnipresent-here-lately local duo Faile, whose recent collabo with the NYC Ballet led many to discover the place called Lincoln Center. The issue is stuffed like an olive with inspiration, including pictures and words by Morning Breath, Eelus, PeachBeach, Moose & Yeti and Agostino Iacurci among others. You can cop one of your very own at the New York launch party next Wednesday at Reed Space, or the London bashment on August 8th at Lazarides Gallery on Rathbone. 

LONDON // NEW YORK

Pond-hopping street art bible VNA is celebrating the release of their 23rd issue with limited edition screenprinted versions by the omnipresent-here-lately local duo Faile, whose recent collabo with the NYC Ballet led many to discover the place called Lincoln Center. The issue is stuffed like an olive with inspiration, including pictures and words by Morning Breath, Eelus, PeachBeach, Moose & Yeti and Agostino Iacurci among others. You can cop one of your very own at the New York launch party next Wednesday at Reed Space, or the London bashment on August 8th at Lazarides Gallery on Rathbone. 


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