Colombia’s Paradero Paralibros Para Parques program has given birth to one hundred miniature libraries all over the South American republic, the majority of which are in Bogotá, Colombia’s main metropolis. The petite libraries are open a scant twelve hours a week, mostly on weekends, and are run by volunteers who also create events for kids and the community and help with homework assignments. Long live print, and long live Colombia’s national literacy organization, Fundalectura, who are responsible for these tiny monuments to the shared power and joy of knowledge.

Colombia’s Paradero Paralibros Para Parques program has given birth to one hundred miniature libraries all over the South American republic, the majority of which are in Bogotá, Colombia’s main metropolis. The petite libraries are open a scant twelve hours a week, mostly on weekends, and are run by volunteers who also create events for kids and the community and help with homework assignments. Long live print, and long live Colombia’s national literacy organization, Fundalectura, who are responsible for these tiny monuments to the shared power and joy of knowledge.


Tennis Courts IIGiasco Bertoli, Paris
“I like to photograph tennis courts when they’re empty, deserted, abandoned, or in disrepair, and sometimes simply when it’s raining and no one’s around and they can’t be used. Seeing them in such a state has, for me, a special kind of eroticism, like the memory of a former lover one still feels for. Each court is in the midst of a landscape, near homes, among trees, or next to streets or buildings. Some are like the ghosts of a tennis court, with faded markings and sagging nets, where too many seasons have passed and not enough care has been given to them. Gathered together, these unoccupied tennis courts engender a special kind of metaphysic, one that relates to the ceremonial combat of an organized competition; the aesthetic atmosphere in which freedom and struggle flourish. Seeing courts in such varied states as these is like coming upon a memory, a new beginning, and another possibility all at once.”
Out this month from Nieves.

Tennis Courts II
Giasco Bertoli, Paris

“I like to photograph tennis courts when they’re empty, deserted, abandoned, or in disrepair, and sometimes simply when it’s raining and no one’s around and they can’t be used. Seeing them in such a state has, for me, a special kind of eroticism, like the memory of a former lover one still feels for. Each court is in the midst of a landscape, near homes, among trees, or next to streets or buildings. Some are like the ghosts of a tennis court, with faded markings and sagging nets, where too many seasons have passed and not enough care has been given to them. Gathered together, these unoccupied tennis courts engender a special kind of metaphysic, one that relates to the ceremonial combat of an organized competition; the aesthetic atmosphere in which freedom and struggle flourish. Seeing courts in such varied states as these is like coming upon a memory, a new beginning, and another possibility all at once.”

Out this month from Nieves.


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