Downtown Los Angeles, California

We spent the morning with Kristen Shaw and Joseph Mandelbaum of Cabin 207, a rare book store and hair salon in Downtown LA. Kristen opened a cozy three chair salon here in the summer of 2013, met Mandelbaum soon after, and the rest is history. In spirit, Cabin is like the original salons. The haircuts lead to talking, the books lead to ideas and the mixture is what makes sense.

Kristen began her career almost a decade ago in NYC at the Chelsea Hotel’s Suite 303. She’d leave work in the evening and bring scissors with her everywhere, telling people what she wanted to do with their hair and cutting it on the spot. Over the years she spent working in editorial and advertising with Jed Root Agency and doing housecalls between NYC and LA, she built up a loyal clientele. She’s been in LA for five years now and continues to do the same, but now you can come to her “home.” 

She met rare book dealer Joseph in NYC, where he was selling books out of his apartment to a dedicated clientele. It didn’t take long for them to hit on the idea on the idea of combining forces, and after building the bookstore together, he relocated with his wife to Los Angeles.
He’s now Cabin’s Creative Director, curating the killer rare book selection and organizing cultural events. Joseph’s approach to book selection is simple: ”If I just couldn’t live without it, I buy it.” Right now the shelves are stocked with about 300 rare books, can’t-live-without art books, and new magazines including, Marfa Journal and Viviane Sassen’s “Die Son Sien Alles.” Every book is displayed face out museum style, that the rule.

Joseph and Kristen love being in downtown LA, and we’re pretty excited to be sharing the neighborhood with them. They’ll be hosting lectures, readings, cultural events, and book launches each month beginning with Graham Walzer in February. To book in the salon call 213.687.7420

Photos by Jessica Comingore






Santa Fe rare book shop Photo-Eye is among dozens of jewels gathering at this weekend’s Art Book Fair at PS1 in Queens. Their books light a flame of book greed in our hearts so strong it hurts. This specimen from their shelves, Shuji Terayama’s Photothèque imaginaire, was designed and handbound in Tokyo, 1975, and belly-bound in an original printed obi.
"Playwright, poet, photographer, filmmaker and all-around provacateur Shuji Terayama is one of the most important figures in the Japanese counter-culture of the sixties and seventies. He produced over 200 literary works and over 20 shorts and full-length films as well as untold works of theater with Tenjo Sajiki and others. Like his films, the photomontages in Photothèque imaginaire… are self-consciously experimental, often surreal, and frequently confounding. And, like the Parisian Surrealists of the 1920s and 30s, he was a great fan of Lautréamont’s Les Chants de Maldoror. He vehemently opposed the protection of the status quo and attacked the righteousness of the Japanese family system and any vestiges of nationalism."
Suzanne Feld, Between Two Worlds: Selected Postwar Japanese Films, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Santa Fe rare book shop Photo-Eye is among dozens of jewels gathering at this weekend’s Art Book Fair at PS1 in Queens. Their books light a flame of book greed in our hearts so strong it hurts. This specimen from their shelves, Shuji Terayama’s Photothèque imaginaire, was designed and handbound in Tokyo, 1975, and belly-bound in an original printed obi.

"Playwright, poet, photographer, filmmaker and all-around provacateur Shuji Terayama is one of the most important figures in the Japanese counter-culture of the sixties and seventies. He produced over 200 literary works and over 20 shorts and full-length films as well as untold works of theater with Tenjo Sajiki and others. Like his films, the photomontages in Photothèque imaginaire… are self-consciously experimental, often surreal, and frequently confounding. And, like the Parisian Surrealists of the 1920s and 30s, he was a great fan of Lautréamont’s Les Chants de Maldoror. He vehemently opposed the protection of the status quo and attacked the righteousness of the Japanese family system and any vestiges of nationalism."

Suzanne Feld, Between Two Worlds: Selected Postwar Japanese Films, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art


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