Hear, hear.
It’s International Record Store Day, and we’ve been thinking a lot lately about how the things we see and hear, and the people we share it all with, profoundly shape our experience. We’re familiar with the pictorial record of the things that get our hearts pounding, the neighborhoods and buildings and people we fall in love with. But what of the everyday music, the ambient temporal and temporary audioscapes, the ephemeral pings and silences that punctuate every day? In celebration of the ineffable particulates that make up our love of place – the roots of our spots in Seattle, Portland, Palm Springs, New York and now LA, London and Panama – we’re tuning our antennae and putting our ear to the ground…
We enlisted the help of our friends Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck of Lucky Dragons to document the audible life of Downtown Los Angeles, and Aino Tytti to capture the uncageable energy of Shoreditch. Lucky Dragons create some of the most interesting sound experiences out there – engaging their physical surroundings, their audience and handmade electronic thingamajigs to create aural snapshots of time and place. Aino Tytti deconstructs and stitches back together the unique harmonies of the shared communal life of sidewalks and cities. In your hands, you hold the fruits of their labors. We also asked artists in every city where we hang our hat to create soundscapes that embody the spirit of each place (or a moment in the space-time continuum). You can read about these noise elves below.
So for now, take a listen. And then if you can, share what you hear when you walk out the door. Send us the early morning sounds of your walk to the train station or the bus stop, or your bike, or to the mailbox at the end of the driveway. Capture the high or the ebb tides of a city alive when you open your windows or walk down an out-of-way lane or stairway into the deep. Also, no one here will protest if you just send a 9 minute recording of your cat purring. We’ll put it all together at our little branch of the Sound Library and share alike.
Using the SoundCloud app on your phone, or any other app for that matter, record audio and then share it on any hashtag-friendly social platform using #acebroadcast and be sure to tag us as well: @acehotel​ on Twitter and Ace Hotel on Facebook. We’re listening, and it’s never too late to share. We’ll pick a few favorites and be in touch.
LUCKY DRAGONS : DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES

Lucky Dragons is an ongoing collaboration between Los Angeles-based artists Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck. Active as a band since 2000, they are known for their participatory approach to making music, radically inclusive live shows, and playful, humanistic use of digital tools.
Fischbeck and Rara have presented collaborative work in a wide variety of contexts, including the Whitney Museum of American Art (as part of the 2008 Whitney Biennial), the Centre Georges Pompidou, Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, London’s Institute for Contemporary Art, The Kitchen in New York, REDCAT and LACMA in Los Angeles, MOCA Los Angeles, the 54th Venice Biennale, and the Smithsonian’s Hirshorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, among others. The name “lucky dragons” is borrowed from a fishing vessel that was caught in the fallout from h-bomb tests in the mid-1950′s, an incident which sparked international outcry and gave birth to the worldwide anti-nuclear movement.
luckydragons.orgacehotel.com/losangeles
AINO TYTTI : SHOREDITCH

Drawing from a palette of processed field recordings, home made synthesizers and distant vocals, Aino Tytti creates shimmering, ethereal drones; fusing interlocking spirals of static and warm distortion into widescreen harmonic backdrops and intricately layered micro structures.
Abandoning conventional tuning scales, sounds are recorded and deconstructed to reveal hidden accents and textures. The results are then layered and expanded using uniquely defined harmonic ratios, realised through custom made synthesizers and digital processing. Part decaying and arresting, part hypnotic yet cerebral, influences from experimentalists such as Popul Vuh, Arvo Part and Throbbing Gristle are smeared alongside contemporary futurists such as Alva Noto and William Basinski.
ainotytti.comacehotel.com/london
FARMER DAVE : PALM SPRINGS

Farmer Dave Scher is an artist from Southern California whose work encompasses music, sound design, DJing and visual art. In addition to his involvement with Beachwood Sparks, All Night Radio and his self-titled work, Scher has worked as a producer and touring/session musician with Animal Collective, Elvis Costello, Interpol, Jenny Lewis, Johnathan Rice, Kurt Vile, Will Oldham, Vetiver and many others. 
A multi-instrumentalist, Scher is known for his textural steel guitar playing and creative use of waveform editing, deriving themes and inspiration from forms and patterns existing in Nature.  He has a particular love for the ocean and its creatures, and often emulates the sound and feel of the Sea with his music. In 2010, Scher launched his multipurpose sound design and composing enterprise Scher Sound, which offers a wide variety of audio-related creative services.
Scher is also the man behind Farmer Dave’s Hot Nuts, a habanero-roasted almond snack based on a family recipe. Mr. Scher lives and works in Venice, CA.
farmerdavescher.comacehotel.com/palmsprings
DIAMOND TERRIFIER : NOMAD DISTRICT, NYC

Diamond Terrifier is musician, DJ, artist, curator Sam Hillmer. Diamond Terrifier is Sam’s saxophone and electronics solo incarnation which sits at the intersection of ambient drone, world bass and sound system music, and the many great non-western saxophone traditions.
Sam Hillmer is the mind behind seminal Brooklyn noise band/chamber ensemble ZS, the You Are Here Festival (aka The Maze) which he conceives and produces with his visual art duo Trouble, and Representing NYC, the youth hip hop moniker that has released records for The Fly Girlz and Nine 11 Thesaurus on True Panther Sounds and The Social Registry respectively.
diamondterrifier.comacehotel.com/newyork
WORLD GANG : PDX + SEA


World Gang is a sound collaborative showcasing the work of Jeremiah Green and Darrin Wiener, two of the most enduring threads in the fabric of the Pacific Northwest’s music scene. Producer Darrin Wiener’s amalgam of synths and field recordings have shaped the sound of the Northwest’s IDM community since the turn of the century — the wizard behind the elegant curtains of Plastiq Phantom, DJs On Strike!, and the imputor? label, Wiener’s textural, humane approach to synthetic sounds has left an indelible stamp on the region’s overcast expanse. And the syncopated pulse of collaborator Jeremiah Green, best known as the unfaltering beat behind Modest Mouse, has been upsetting Cascadia’s rhythm for over 20 years. 
With an enviable résumé in film music, sound installation, and commercial work, World Gang has applied their nimble synthesis of organic sound and roiling electronics to a wide range of collaborative projects since 2006. 
music.world-gang.comacehotel.com/portlandacehotel.com/seattle
INGMAR HERRERA : PANAMA

Panamanian sound artist Ingmar Herrera presents an evocative street collage from busy avenues of Casco Viejo, near our latest portfolio project, American Trade Hotel.
acehotel.com/panama

Hear, hear.

It’s International Record Store Day, and we’ve been thinking a lot lately about how the things we see and hear, and the people we share it all with, profoundly shape our experience. We’re familiar with the pictorial record of the things that get our hearts pounding, the neighborhoods and buildings and people we fall in love with. But what of the everyday music, the ambient temporal and temporary audioscapes, the ephemeral pings and silences that punctuate every day? In celebration of the ineffable particulates that make up our love of place – the roots of our spots in Seattle, Portland, Palm Springs, New York and now LA, London and Panama – we’re tuning our antennae and putting our ear to the ground…

We enlisted the help of our friends Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck of Lucky Dragons to document the audible life of Downtown Los Angeles, and Aino Tytti to capture the uncageable energy of Shoreditch. Lucky Dragons create some of the most interesting sound experiences out there – engaging their physical surroundings, their audience and handmade electronic thingamajigs to create aural snapshots of time and place. Aino Tytti deconstructs and stitches back together the unique harmonies of the shared communal life of sidewalks and cities. In your hands, you hold the fruits of their labors. We also asked artists in every city where we hang our hat to create soundscapes that embody the spirit of each place (or a moment in the space-time continuum). You can read about these noise elves below.

So for now, take a listen. And then if you can, share what you hear when you walk out the door. Send us the early morning sounds of your walk to the train station or the bus stop, or your bike, or to the mailbox at the end of the driveway. Capture the high or the ebb tides of a city alive when you open your windows or walk down an out-of-way lane or stairway into the deep. Also, no one here will protest if you just send a 9 minute recording of your cat purring. We’ll put it all together at our little branch of the Sound Library and share alike.

Using the SoundCloud app on your phone, or any other app for that matter, record audio and then share it on any hashtag-friendly social platform using #acebroadcast and be sure to tag us as well: @acehotel on Twitter and Ace Hotel on Facebook. We’re listening, and it’s never too late to share. We’ll pick a few favorites and be in touch.


LUCKY DRAGONS : DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES


Lucky Dragons is an ongoing collaboration between Los Angeles-based artists Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck. Active as a band since 2000, they are known for their participatory approach to making music, radically inclusive live shows, and playful, humanistic use of digital tools.

Fischbeck and Rara have presented collaborative work in a wide variety of contexts, including the Whitney Museum of American Art (as part of the 2008 Whitney Biennial), the Centre Georges Pompidou, Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, London’s Institute for Contemporary Art, The Kitchen in New York, REDCAT and LACMA in Los Angeles, MOCA Los Angeles, the 54th Venice Biennale, and the Smithsonian’s Hirshorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, among others. The name “lucky dragons” is borrowed from a fishing vessel that was caught in the fallout from h-bomb tests in the mid-1950′s, an incident which sparked international outcry and gave birth to the worldwide anti-nuclear movement.

luckydragons.org
acehotel.com/losangeles


AINO TYTTI : SHOREDITCH

Drawing from a palette of processed field recordings, home made synthesizers and distant vocals, Aino Tytti creates shimmering, ethereal drones; fusing interlocking spirals of static and warm distortion into widescreen harmonic backdrops and intricately layered micro structures.

Abandoning conventional tuning scales, sounds are recorded and deconstructed to reveal hidden accents and textures. The results are then layered and expanded using uniquely defined harmonic ratios, realised through custom made synthesizers and digital processing. Part decaying and arresting, part hypnotic yet cerebral, influences from experimentalists such as Popul Vuh, Arvo Part and Throbbing Gristle are smeared alongside contemporary futurists such as Alva Noto and William Basinski.

ainotytti.com
acehotel.com/london


FARMER DAVE : PALM SPRINGS

Farmer Dave Scher is an artist from Southern California whose work encompasses music, sound design, DJing and visual art. In addition to his involvement with Beachwood Sparks, All Night Radio and his self-titled work, Scher has worked as a producer and touring/session musician with Animal Collective, Elvis Costello, Interpol, Jenny Lewis, Johnathan Rice, Kurt Vile, Will Oldham, Vetiver and many others. 

A multi-instrumentalist, Scher is known for his textural steel guitar playing and creative use of waveform editing, deriving themes and inspiration from forms and patterns existing in Nature.  He has a particular love for the ocean and its creatures, and often emulates the sound and feel of the Sea with his music. In 2010, Scher launched his multipurpose sound design and composing enterprise Scher Sound, which offers a wide variety of audio-related creative services.

Scher is also the man behind Farmer Dave’s Hot Nuts, a habanero-roasted almond snack based on a family recipe. Mr. Scher lives and works in Venice, CA.

farmerdavescher.com
acehotel.com/palmsprings

DIAMOND TERRIFIER : NOMAD DISTRICT, NYC

Diamond Terrifier is musician, DJ, artist, curator Sam Hillmer. Diamond Terrifier is Sam’s saxophone and electronics solo incarnation which sits at the intersection of ambient drone, world bass and sound system music, and the many great non-western saxophone traditions.

Sam Hillmer is the mind behind seminal Brooklyn noise band/chamber ensemble ZS, the You Are Here Festival (aka The Maze) which he conceives and produces with his visual art duo Trouble, and Representing NYC, the youth hip hop moniker that has released records for The Fly Girlz and Nine 11 Thesaurus on True Panther Sounds and The Social Registry respectively.

diamondterrifier.com
acehotel.com/newyork

WORLD GANG : PDX + SEA

World Gang is a sound collaborative showcasing the work of Jeremiah Green and Darrin Wiener, two of the most enduring threads in the fabric of the Pacific Northwest’s music scene. Producer Darrin Wiener’s amalgam of synths and field recordings have shaped the sound of the Northwest’s IDM community since the turn of the century — the wizard behind the elegant curtains of Plastiq Phantom, DJs On Strike!, and the imputor? label, Wiener’s textural, humane approach to synthetic sounds has left an indelible stamp on the region’s overcast expanse. And the syncopated pulse of collaborator Jeremiah Green, best known as the unfaltering beat behind Modest Mouse, has been upsetting Cascadia’s rhythm for over 20 years. 

With an enviable résumé in film music, sound installation, and commercial work, World Gang has applied their nimble synthesis of organic sound and roiling electronics to a wide range of collaborative projects since 2006. 

music.world-gang.com
acehotel.com/portland
acehotel.com/seattle

INGMAR HERRERA : PANAMA

Panamanian sound artist Ingmar Herrera presents an evocative street collage from busy avenues of Casco Viejo, near our latest portfolio project, American Trade Hotel.

acehotel.com/panama


Seattle, WA
“It was a pity that there was no radar to guide one across the trackless seas of life. Every man had to find his own way, steered by some secret compass of the soul.” — Arthur C. Clarke
Holcombe Waller's mind wanders. He's been producing and releasing albums on his own since, well, since there was no other choice — his sweet, dulcet voice trickling out like God's gift to song. He's spent the last seven-or-so years of his life in Portland flirting with theater —producing a handful of elaborate conceptual performance pieces for stages around the country.
His latest work is “Wayfarers” — a lurching meditation on navigation, orientation, technology and self-identity — premieres tonight at On The Boards in Seattle, and continues through Saturday.

Seattle, WA

“It was a pity that there was no radar to guide one across the trackless seas of life. Every man had to find his own way, steered by some secret compass of the soul.” — Arthur C. Clarke

Holcombe Waller's mind wanders. He's been producing and releasing albums on his own since, well, since there was no other choice — his sweet, dulcet voice trickling out like God's gift to song. He's spent the last seven-or-so years of his life in Portland flirting with theater —producing a handful of elaborate conceptual performance pieces for stages around the country.

His latest work is “Wayfarers” — a lurching meditation on navigation, orientation, technology and self-identity — premieres tonight at On The Boards in Seattle, and continues through Saturday.


Seattle, WA

Seattle, WA


Fortune isn’t nearly as fragile as the haters would have us think. Alexsandra Pollner created these porcelain fortune cookies with Object, crushable by the truly committed, and populated by smoke signals from Seattle psychic Darleen Christopher. These appear to be very addictive. Possibly unseating bubble wrap of its nervous habit throne. But like most fortune cookies, you shouldn’t actually eat one — you could chip a tooth.

Fortune isn’t nearly as fragile as the haters would have us think. Alexsandra Pollner created these porcelain fortune cookies with Object, crushable by the truly committed, and populated by smoke signals from Seattle psychic Darleen Christopher. These appear to be very addictive. Possibly unseating bubble wrap of its nervous habit throne. But like most fortune cookies, you shouldn’t actually eat one — you could chip a tooth.

image

image


We debuted our custom Ace radios with Scotland-based Revo today when we swung the doors open at Ace Hotel London Shoreditch. Each radio in-room boasts a curated set of hot buttons that act as a portal to our favorite new discoveries and classic standbys, including independent radio, soundscapes and Monocle's round-the-clock coverage of everything on the planet. We want to treat your ears as well as we can, and the planet, too. These radios feature a digital amplifier that reduces power consumption but increases the amount of creative power in your own mind.
We’ll be changing stations and sounds on the hot buttons over time. You can keep track of them all hear, just kidding here, and we’ll be posting more about the waves in the air over time right here.
1 : KEXPBorn in Seattle, KEXP is our #1 homie. But we share so much beyond a hometown. Our love of music, discovery and community have made us steadfast friends and long-time collaborators. On the air for over four decades, this tiny radio-station-that-could started as a 10-watt transmitter is located on top of McMahon Hall on the University of Washington campus. It’s since grown to one of the most celebrated and respected independent, community-driven radio stations on the planet. It won a Webby for Best Radio Website when the internet was just a wee baby in 2004, and even opened a branch in New York City, serving all five boroughs. For a few years, we’ve collaborated with KEXP to broadcast live from the lobby at Ace Hotel New York during CMJ, and we’ve made some really good friends along the way.
2 : NTS RadioWith their first radio broadcast just months behind them, London’s NTS was born, in a sort of KEXP reversal, from the blog nutstosoup.com (now laid to rest). NTS aims to fill a void in the community of musically and progressively minded Londoners (and citizens of the world). A unique platform for inspired people to present their findings, passions and obsessions, NTS draws on local wisdom of the young and old in London from label founders to magazine editors to style icons to musical discoverers sailing the rocky seas of basement shows and pirate internet stations and tape deck-only road trips to bring the best and brightest to your ears day and night.
[[MORE]]
3 : Monocle 24Monocle is a global briefing on international affairs, business, culture and design headquartered in London. In print Monocle’s 10 issues a year are dense, book-ish and collectable, and call on a global team of staff editors and over thirty correspondents from Beirut to Milan, Washington to Singapore. Monocle 24, their round-the-clock radio station launched its first broadcast a couple autumns ago from Midori House in Marylebone. Delivering news and comment, plus magazine shows covering a range of topics including food and drink, urbanism, design and print media, their newsgathering operation will soon stretch to new bureaux in São Paulo and across Asia, as well as more correspondents in emerging and established territories. Monocle, with a sharp ear and astute eye on the world, are old friends of the Ace family and some of our favorite armchair and expert thinkers on everything from straight-lined to particulate and curvaceous topics of conversation.
4 : Resonance FMResonance FM celebrates the ‘art’ of radio and music, and tends toward programming that pushes the status quo for what radio can be. Framework is one of our favorite shows dedicated to soundscapes and field recording. The more London-local shows like The Hooting Yard (an hour of field-recorded sounds from the speaker’s point in Hyde Park) and The Pensioner’s Show (an hour of one, gruff fellow ranting about the current state of pensioners rights and news) get our hearts racing.
We actually learned about Resonance while listening to Do or DIY with Vicki Bennett of People Like Us on WFMU (Ace Revo Broadcast Two). Vicki was doing some collaborations with Ergo Phizmiz and, at the time, guest shows from the Resonance studios in London. There’s a really great show of Christian Marclay performing live at the London Tate near Christmas from about 2005. It’s an hour-long, sprawling mix of sounds and song and it’s wonderful. Resonance is an audio volcano of things you never knew how badly you wanted to listen to until you do and then you feel like your brain is bigger. That’s what they do.
5 : WFMUWFMU is like the radical big-brother of free-form stations across the country. They’re not tied to any university or college, they have little rules to follow and they been at it for decades. They have a ridiculously diverse range of shows and hosts. And their library! It can make a grown man cry. You can listen to a dedicated rap show for three hours and then go right into a bad talk/call-in for an hour, and then into a show dedicated to antique phonographs. And they do it all with volunteers, few paid staff and membership drives that defy the boring, disenchanting norm. Long live the Woof Moo.

We debuted our custom Ace radios with Scotland-based Revo today when we swung the doors open at Ace Hotel London Shoreditch. Each radio in-room boasts a curated set of hot buttons that act as a portal to our favorite new discoveries and classic standbys, including independent radio, soundscapes and Monocle's round-the-clock coverage of everything on the planet. We want to treat your ears as well as we can, and the planet, too. These radios feature a digital amplifier that reduces power consumption but increases the amount of creative power in your own mind.

We’ll be changing stations and sounds on the hot buttons over time. You can keep track of them all hear, just kidding here, and we’ll be posting more about the waves in the air over time right here.

1 : KEXP
Born in Seattle, KEXP is our #1 homie. But we share so much beyond a hometown. Our love of music, discovery and community have made us steadfast friends and long-time collaborators. On the air for over four decades, this tiny radio-station-that-could started as a 10-watt transmitter is located on top of McMahon Hall on the University of Washington campus. It’s since grown to one of the most celebrated and respected independent, community-driven radio stations on the planet. It won a Webby for Best Radio Website when the internet was just a wee baby in 2004, and even opened a branch in New York City, serving all five boroughs. For a few years, we’ve collaborated with KEXP to broadcast live from the lobby at Ace Hotel New York during CMJ, and we’ve made some really good friends along the way.

2 : NTS Radio
With their first radio broadcast just months behind them, London’s NTS was born, in a sort of KEXP reversal, from the blog nutstosoup.com (now laid to rest). NTS aims to fill a void in the community of musically and progressively minded Londoners (and citizens of the world). A unique platform for inspired people to present their findings, passions and obsessions, NTS draws on local wisdom of the young and old in London from label founders to magazine editors to style icons to musical discoverers sailing the rocky seas of basement shows and pirate internet stations and tape deck-only road trips to bring the best and brightest to your ears day and night.

Read More


In 1851, Frederick Scott Archer invented the wet-plate collodion photographic process, more commonly known as the tintype. Because tintypes were safer and more affordable than the earlier Daguerreotypes, for the first time, people could own portraits of themselves and their loved ones. Many people once believed that photographs were a way of stealing one’s soul. From the eerily beautiful way tintypes reflect the eyes, skin and shadow, it would appear they at least pull it acutely to the surface.
You can get your own tintype portrait taken by Michael Schindler, owner of the tintype-specialized photographic studio Photobooth in San Francisco, on July 28 at The Aviary in Seattle, with which you can spook, woo and wow yourself and others. Michael works accordingly to the techniques that Frederick Scott Archer developed 150 years ago: each tintype photograph is crafted directly onto a chemically-treated metal plate placed in the camera. The process is very meticulous, and the talent of the photographer lies in his ability to master the chemistry and the lighting, as well as a careful timing. For his session at The Aviary, Michael will bring along the 14”x17” camera that he just completed in order to create the largest format metal plate images he has ever produced.
In a time where we take so many photographs every day that we rarely even print them out, this format movingly encourages us to slow down, show up and remember.
To arrange a portrait sitting, send an email or call 206.641.4481.

In 1851, Frederick Scott Archer invented the wet-plate collodion photographic process, more commonly known as the tintype. Because tintypes were safer and more affordable than the earlier Daguerreotypes, for the first time, people could own portraits of themselves and their loved ones. Many people once believed that photographs were a way of stealing one’s soul. From the eerily beautiful way tintypes reflect the eyes, skin and shadow, it would appear they at least pull it acutely to the surface.

You can get your own tintype portrait taken by Michael Schindler, owner of the tintype-specialized photographic studio Photobooth in San Francisco, on July 28 at The Aviary in Seattle, with which you can spook, woo and wow yourself and others. Michael works accordingly to the techniques that Frederick Scott Archer developed 150 years ago: each tintype photograph is crafted directly onto a chemically-treated metal plate placed in the camera. The process is very meticulous, and the talent of the photographer lies in his ability to master the chemistry and the lighting, as well as a careful timing. For his session at The Aviary, Michael will bring along the 14”x17” camera that he just completed in order to create the largest format metal plate images he has ever produced.

In a time where we take so many photographs every day that we rarely even print them out, this format movingly encourages us to slow down, show up and remember.

To arrange a portrait sitting, send an email or call 206.641.4481.

image


Beacon Food Forest is a developing seven-acre food forest on Beacon Hill in Seattle. A forest. Of food. Learn more and help out.

Beacon Food Forest is a developing seven-acre food forest on Beacon Hill in Seattle. A forest. Of food. Learn more and help out.


Seattle-based Blackbird Ballard is camping out at the shop above Rudy’s Barbershop next door to Ace Hotel New York until the first day of July. Stop in for incense pyres and friendly faces.

Seattle-based Blackbird Ballard is camping out at the shop above Rudy’s Barbershop next door to Ace Hotel New York until the first day of July. Stop in for incense pyres and friendly faces.


Seattle’s King Street Station reopened to the public this week after a decade-long renovation of this 105-year-old beauty. Here, the clock tower and handful of King Street’s broken teeth.

Seattle’s King Street Station reopened to the public this week after a decade-long renovation of this 105-year-old beauty. Here, the clock tower and handful of King Street’s broken teeth.


IMOGEN, ANSEL AND THE POT PLANT

We started to have a talk about Minor and Ansel, and she began to tell stories about these younger friends of hers, who in her opinion couldn’t properly take care of their health — she was 91 at the time. Then she began to gossip about Ansel and what a prude and tight-ass he was. “He’s always showing off,” she said.

Ansel had done an advertising campaign for Yuban coffee, and they used one of his Yosemite pictures on the outside of the can. Ansel sent a five-pound can to Imogen, and the coffee was excellent, and she figured, “Well, I now have to pay him back.” So she put a bunch of earth in the can and some seeds and sent it down to Carmel with the directions, “Just add water, Ansel. Here are some beautiful plants for you.” He did as she directed, and the plant came up strong and healthy. And then one day his buddy the sheriff came to visit in his home and looked at it and said, “Ansel, what are you doing growing dope? You know I can arrest you for this.” Needless to say, Ansel then got on the phone to cuss her out. She just thought it was hilarious.

Photographer Abe Frajndlich on his first meeting with prankster and photography legend Imogen Cunningham, and her punking of Ansel Adams, in his book Penelope’s Hungry Eyes. Imogen’s spiritual kinship with painter Georgie O’Keefe is the subject of one lens in the Seattle Art Museum’s Elles exhibition — a look at work by seminal female artists, up through February 17. If you need a place to stay while you’re here, let us know.

All photos by Alan Ross


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