Seattle, WA

Seattle, WA


Fortune isn’t nearly as fragile as the haters would have us think. Alexsandra Pollner created these porcelain fortune cookies with Object, crushable by the truly committed, and populated by smoke signals from Seattle psychic Darleen Christopher. These appear to be very addictive. Possibly unseating bubble wrap of its nervous habit throne. But like most fortune cookies, you shouldn’t actually eat one — you could chip a tooth.

Fortune isn’t nearly as fragile as the haters would have us think. Alexsandra Pollner created these porcelain fortune cookies with Object, crushable by the truly committed, and populated by smoke signals from Seattle psychic Darleen Christopher. These appear to be very addictive. Possibly unseating bubble wrap of its nervous habit throne. But like most fortune cookies, you shouldn’t actually eat one — you could chip a tooth.

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We debuted our custom Ace radios with Scotland-based Revo today when we swung the doors open at Ace Hotel London Shoreditch. Each radio in-room boasts a curated set of hot buttons that act as a portal to our favorite new discoveries and classic standbys, including independent radio, soundscapes and Monocle's round-the-clock coverage of everything on the planet. We want to treat your ears as well as we can, and the planet, too. These radios feature a digital amplifier that reduces power consumption but increases the amount of creative power in your own mind.
We’ll be changing stations and sounds on the hot buttons over time. You can keep track of them all hear, just kidding here, and we’ll be posting more about the waves in the air over time right here.
1 : KEXPBorn in Seattle, KEXP is our #1 homie. But we share so much beyond a hometown. Our love of music, discovery and community have made us steadfast friends and long-time collaborators. On the air for over four decades, this tiny radio-station-that-could started as a 10-watt transmitter is located on top of McMahon Hall on the University of Washington campus. It’s since grown to one of the most celebrated and respected independent, community-driven radio stations on the planet. It won a Webby for Best Radio Website when the internet was just a wee baby in 2004, and even opened a branch in New York City, serving all five boroughs. For a few years, we’ve collaborated with KEXP to broadcast live from the lobby at Ace Hotel New York during CMJ, and we’ve made some really good friends along the way.
2 : NTS RadioWith their first radio broadcast just months behind them, London’s NTS was born, in a sort of KEXP reversal, from the blog nutstosoup.com (now laid to rest). NTS aims to fill a void in the community of musically and progressively minded Londoners (and citizens of the world). A unique platform for inspired people to present their findings, passions and obsessions, NTS draws on local wisdom of the young and old in London from label founders to magazine editors to style icons to musical discoverers sailing the rocky seas of basement shows and pirate internet stations and tape deck-only road trips to bring the best and brightest to your ears day and night.
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3 : Monocle 24Monocle is a global briefing on international affairs, business, culture and design headquartered in London. In print Monocle’s 10 issues a year are dense, book-ish and collectable, and call on a global team of staff editors and over thirty correspondents from Beirut to Milan, Washington to Singapore. Monocle 24, their round-the-clock radio station launched its first broadcast a couple autumns ago from Midori House in Marylebone. Delivering news and comment, plus magazine shows covering a range of topics including food and drink, urbanism, design and print media, their newsgathering operation will soon stretch to new bureaux in São Paulo and across Asia, as well as more correspondents in emerging and established territories. Monocle, with a sharp ear and astute eye on the world, are old friends of the Ace family and some of our favorite armchair and expert thinkers on everything from straight-lined to particulate and curvaceous topics of conversation.
4 : Resonance FMResonance FM celebrates the ‘art’ of radio and music, and tends toward programming that pushes the status quo for what radio can be. Framework is one of our favorite shows dedicated to soundscapes and field recording. The more London-local shows like The Hooting Yard (an hour of field-recorded sounds from the speaker’s point in Hyde Park) and The Pensioner’s Show (an hour of one, gruff fellow ranting about the current state of pensioners rights and news) get our hearts racing.
We actually learned about Resonance while listening to Do or DIY with Vicki Bennett of People Like Us on WFMU (Ace Revo Broadcast Two). Vicki was doing some collaborations with Ergo Phizmiz and, at the time, guest shows from the Resonance studios in London. There’s a really great show of Christian Marclay performing live at the London Tate near Christmas from about 2005. It’s an hour-long, sprawling mix of sounds and song and it’s wonderful. Resonance is an audio volcano of things you never knew how badly you wanted to listen to until you do and then you feel like your brain is bigger. That’s what they do.
5 : WFMUWFMU is like the radical big-brother of free-form stations across the country. They’re not tied to any university or college, they have little rules to follow and they been at it for decades. They have a ridiculously diverse range of shows and hosts. And their library! It can make a grown man cry. You can listen to a dedicated rap show for three hours and then go right into a bad talk/call-in for an hour, and then into a show dedicated to antique phonographs. And they do it all with volunteers, few paid staff and membership drives that defy the boring, disenchanting norm. Long live the Woof Moo.

We debuted our custom Ace radios with Scotland-based Revo today when we swung the doors open at Ace Hotel London Shoreditch. Each radio in-room boasts a curated set of hot buttons that act as a portal to our favorite new discoveries and classic standbys, including independent radio, soundscapes and Monocle's round-the-clock coverage of everything on the planet. We want to treat your ears as well as we can, and the planet, too. These radios feature a digital amplifier that reduces power consumption but increases the amount of creative power in your own mind.

We’ll be changing stations and sounds on the hot buttons over time. You can keep track of them all hear, just kidding here, and we’ll be posting more about the waves in the air over time right here.

1 : KEXP
Born in Seattle, KEXP is our #1 homie. But we share so much beyond a hometown. Our love of music, discovery and community have made us steadfast friends and long-time collaborators. On the air for over four decades, this tiny radio-station-that-could started as a 10-watt transmitter is located on top of McMahon Hall on the University of Washington campus. It’s since grown to one of the most celebrated and respected independent, community-driven radio stations on the planet. It won a Webby for Best Radio Website when the internet was just a wee baby in 2004, and even opened a branch in New York City, serving all five boroughs. For a few years, we’ve collaborated with KEXP to broadcast live from the lobby at Ace Hotel New York during CMJ, and we’ve made some really good friends along the way.

2 : NTS Radio
With their first radio broadcast just months behind them, London’s NTS was born, in a sort of KEXP reversal, from the blog nutstosoup.com (now laid to rest). NTS aims to fill a void in the community of musically and progressively minded Londoners (and citizens of the world). A unique platform for inspired people to present their findings, passions and obsessions, NTS draws on local wisdom of the young and old in London from label founders to magazine editors to style icons to musical discoverers sailing the rocky seas of basement shows and pirate internet stations and tape deck-only road trips to bring the best and brightest to your ears day and night.

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Later this afternoon, the sixth annual Doe Bay Festival kicks off. One of the Pacific Northwest’s best-kept secrets, less than a thousand tickets to this damn-near-perfect little gathering sell out in a few short minutes each year. Just a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our front door in Seattle (or a quick drive, a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our home in Portland), we can almost see it from here. And to the lucky souls chugging westward across the water to Orcas Island today, we wish you the best of times— and the best of luck next year. We’re officially in the competition for a couple of those tickets, and we’re not afraid to throw an elbow or two.
Photo by Jason Neuerburg.

Later this afternoon, the sixth annual Doe Bay Festival kicks off. One of the Pacific Northwest’s best-kept secrets, less than a thousand tickets to this damn-near-perfect little gathering sell out in a few short minutes each year. Just a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our front door in Seattle (or a quick drive, a casual stroll and a ferry ride from our home in Portland), we can almost see it from here. And to the lucky souls chugging westward across the water to Orcas Island today, we wish you the best of times— and the best of luck next year. We’re officially in the competition for a couple of those tickets, and we’re not afraid to throw an elbow or two.

Photo by Jason Neuerburg.


In 1851, Frederick Scott Archer invented the wet-plate collodion photographic process, more commonly known as the tintype. Because tintypes were safer and more affordable than the earlier Daguerreotypes, for the first time, people could own portraits of themselves and their loved ones. Many people once believed that photographs were a way of stealing one’s soul. From the eerily beautiful way tintypes reflect the eyes, skin and shadow, it would appear they at least pull it acutely to the surface.
You can get your own tintype portrait taken by Michael Schindler, owner of the tintype-specialized photographic studio Photobooth in San Francisco, on July 28 at The Aviary in Seattle, with which you can spook, woo and wow yourself and others. Michael works accordingly to the techniques that Frederick Scott Archer developed 150 years ago: each tintype photograph is crafted directly onto a chemically-treated metal plate placed in the camera. The process is very meticulous, and the talent of the photographer lies in his ability to master the chemistry and the lighting, as well as a careful timing. For his session at The Aviary, Michael will bring along the 14”x17” camera that he just completed in order to create the largest format metal plate images he has ever produced.
In a time where we take so many photographs every day that we rarely even print them out, this format movingly encourages us to slow down, show up and remember.
To arrange a portrait sitting, send an email or call 206.641.4481.

In 1851, Frederick Scott Archer invented the wet-plate collodion photographic process, more commonly known as the tintype. Because tintypes were safer and more affordable than the earlier Daguerreotypes, for the first time, people could own portraits of themselves and their loved ones. Many people once believed that photographs were a way of stealing one’s soul. From the eerily beautiful way tintypes reflect the eyes, skin and shadow, it would appear they at least pull it acutely to the surface.

You can get your own tintype portrait taken by Michael Schindler, owner of the tintype-specialized photographic studio Photobooth in San Francisco, on July 28 at The Aviary in Seattle, with which you can spook, woo and wow yourself and others. Michael works accordingly to the techniques that Frederick Scott Archer developed 150 years ago: each tintype photograph is crafted directly onto a chemically-treated metal plate placed in the camera. The process is very meticulous, and the talent of the photographer lies in his ability to master the chemistry and the lighting, as well as a careful timing. For his session at The Aviary, Michael will bring along the 14”x17” camera that he just completed in order to create the largest format metal plate images he has ever produced.

In a time where we take so many photographs every day that we rarely even print them out, this format movingly encourages us to slow down, show up and remember.

To arrange a portrait sitting, send an email or call 206.641.4481.

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Elliott Bay Book Company celebrates 40 years of independent bookselling today in Seattle, Washington, where we also threw down our first roots. After 36 years Downtown, they schlepped their assets over to Capitol Hill, into this 95-year-old warehouse that was once the sole Ford truck service center for Seattle. Now it’s a service center and warm hearth for devotees of the endangered real, live book, and its patron saint, the bookseller. If you’re staying with us in Seattle, you can take a long walk or a short cab ride to this epic church of reading — it’s really worth it.

Elliott Bay Book Company celebrates 40 years of independent bookselling today in Seattle, Washington, where we also threw down our first roots. After 36 years Downtown, they schlepped their assets over to Capitol Hill, into this 95-year-old warehouse that was once the sole Ford truck service center for Seattle. Now it’s a service center and warm hearth for devotees of the endangered real, live book, and its patron saint, the bookseller. If you’re staying with us in Seattle, you can take a long walk or a short cab ride to this epic church of reading — it’s really worth it.


Beacon Food Forest is a developing seven-acre food forest on Beacon Hill in Seattle. A forest. Of food. Learn more and help out.

Beacon Food Forest is a developing seven-acre food forest on Beacon Hill in Seattle. A forest. Of food. Learn more and help out.


Seattle-based Blackbird Ballard is camping out at the shop above Rudy’s Barbershop next door to Ace Hotel New York until the first day of July. Stop in for incense pyres and friendly faces.

Seattle-based Blackbird Ballard is camping out at the shop above Rudy’s Barbershop next door to Ace Hotel New York until the first day of July. Stop in for incense pyres and friendly faces.


Seattle’s King Street Station reopened to the public this week after a decade-long renovation of this 105-year-old beauty. Here, the clock tower and handful of King Street’s broken teeth.

Seattle’s King Street Station reopened to the public this week after a decade-long renovation of this 105-year-old beauty. Here, the clock tower and handful of King Street’s broken teeth.


We spent a few days in Seattle, getting misted sideways by friendly, effervescent mid-March particulate matter, and visiting friends. In the big bright haze of Totokaelo's windows, we took in Phillip Low's willful, mesmerizing acrylic crystals and tucked the colors away in a future-positive forward glance to real spring.

We spent a few days in Seattle, getting misted sideways by friendly, effervescent mid-March particulate matter, and visiting friends. In the big bright haze of Totokaelo's windows, we took in Phillip Low's willful, mesmerizing acrylic crystals and tucked the colors away in a future-positive forward glance to real spring.


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