Artist and pal Timothy Goodman, who gave Ace Hotel NYC room 910 its soul, is part of Plywood for Good, an auction tonight in San Francisco, hosted by Collective Good — thirty skateboard decks were distributed to thirty Bay Area artists to with as they pleased. 100% of proceeds will be donated to further support relief efforts in Japan — Tim has represented the colors of Japan’s flag in his piece. Come out if you’re in the neighborhood — see full details on Tim’s blog.

Artist and pal Timothy Goodman, who gave Ace Hotel NYC room 910 its soul, is part of Plywood for Good, an auction tonight in San Francisco, hosted by Collective Good — thirty skateboard decks were distributed to thirty Bay Area artists to with as they pleased. 100% of proceeds will be donated to further support relief efforts in Japan — Tim has represented the colors of Japan’s flag in his piece. Come out if you’re in the neighborhood — see full details on Tim’s blog.


Rest in peace, Vicki Marlane — the longest-standing drag queen in San Francisco. The Girl with the Liquid Spine, you will be sorely missed.

Rest in peace, Vicki Marlane — the longest-standing drag queen in San Francisco. The Girl with the Liquid Spine, you will be sorely missed.


We went yesterday to see Margaret Kilgallen's works on paper and canvas — some never before exhibited — in the tiny, reverent space of Ratio 3 on Stevenson Street in San Francisco. Down an alley littered with bright hot flowers and discarded couch cushions, the door to Ratio 3 sits hidden behind a wild climbing plant, and inside is a church-like homage to Kilgallen's intricate, intimate paintings. On torn book backs and stitched-together canvases, her obsessive, perfect leaf teeth, small monsoons of tiny white tears and gentle smirking red lips line the walls — walking past them is an unforgettable conversation with a genius, and each mark looks ordained from above. This work is a rare, private gem that reveals not only the moments of Kilgallen’s days but also the workings of a mind that influenced painting, print art and cultural, emotional aesthetics well beyond the temporal and earthly reach of her short life. The show is up through August 5 here. After you’ve seen it, walk around the corner to Four Barrel, say hi to Brett, and get a cornmeal blueberry donut and a macchiato as you let it all sink in. Something we noticed is that everyone’s face looks like a Kilgallen painting for the next hour or so.

We went yesterday to see Margaret Kilgallen's works on paper and canvas — some never before exhibited — in the tiny, reverent space of Ratio 3 on Stevenson Street in San Francisco. Down an alley littered with bright hot flowers and discarded couch cushions, the door to Ratio 3 sits hidden behind a wild climbing plant, and inside is a church-like homage to Kilgallen's intricate, intimate paintings. On torn book backs and stitched-together canvases, her obsessive, perfect leaf teeth, small monsoons of tiny white tears and gentle smirking red lips line the walls — walking past them is an unforgettable conversation with a genius, and each mark looks ordained from above. This work is a rare, private gem that reveals not only the moments of Kilgallen’s days but also the workings of a mind that influenced painting, print art and cultural, emotional aesthetics well beyond the temporal and earthly reach of her short life.┬áThe show is up through August 5 here. After you’ve seen it, walk around the corner to Four Barrel, say hi to Brett, and get a cornmeal blueberry donut and a macchiato as you let it all sink in. Something we noticed is that everyone’s face looks like a Kilgallen painting for the next hour or so.


Do yourself a favor and take someone hot on a date to see Breaking Away tomorrow night at Rapha Cycle Club’s San Francisco outpost. See more info on their calendar.


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