We spent a few days in Seattle, getting misted sideways by friendly, effervescent mid-March particulate matter, and visiting friends. In the big bright haze of Totokaelo's windows, we took in Phillip Low's willful, mesmerizing acrylic crystals and tucked the colors away in a future-positive forward glance to real spring.

We spent a few days in Seattle, getting misted sideways by friendly, effervescent mid-March particulate matter, and visiting friends. In the big bright haze of Totokaelo's windows, we took in Phillip Low's willful, mesmerizing acrylic crystals and tucked the colors away in a future-positive forward glance to real spring.


Bear witness here to some work by coastally-limber Ace artist-in-residence Mr. Johnne Eschleman at Ace Hotel Seattle. Come and visit them sometime.

Bear witness here to some work by coastally-limber Ace artist-in-residence Mr. Johnne Eschleman at Ace Hotel Seattle. Come and visit them sometime.

image

image




In 1986, Bruce Pavitt was a DJ at Seattle’s KCMU (now KEXP) and writer for The Rocket, when he released a compilation album called the Sub Pop 100. You may have heard of the record label that grew from these auspicious beginnings. Heavily associated with a genre called ‘grunge’ at one point, Sub Pop has continued to evolve since that time, somehow surviving the near-total collapse of the record industry despite releasing albums with titles like Heavens to Murgatroyd, Even! It’s Thee Headcoats! (Already). Bruce is an old friend and he’s on tour with Experiencing Nirvana: Grunge in Europe, 1989, his new photo journal and grunge micro-history of eight days of yore he spent on the road with a fairly quintessential trio of Seattle bands — Tad, Mudhoney and Nirvana. So we asked if he could stop by and hold court in the lobby at Ace New York tonight and he obliged.

In 1986, Bruce Pavitt was a DJ at Seattle’s KCMU (now KEXP) and writer for The Rocket, when he released a compilation album called the Sub Pop 100. You may have heard of the record label that grew from these auspicious beginnings. Heavily associated with a genre called ‘grunge’ at one point, Sub Pop has continued to evolve since that time, somehow surviving the near-total collapse of the record industry despite releasing albums with titles like Heavens to Murgatroyd, Even! It’s Thee Headcoats! (Already). Bruce is an old friend and he’s on tour with Experiencing Nirvana: Grunge in Europe, 1989, his new photo journal and grunge micro-history of eight days of yore he spent on the road with a fairly quintessential trio of Seattle bands — TadMudhoney and Nirvana. So we asked if he could stop by and hold court in the lobby at Ace New York tonight and he obliged.


Powered by Tumblr