Thurston Moore played a live set at the Aladdin Theater in Portland last weekend. He’s left some signed wax and setlists at Ace Hotel Portland for some lucky folks to pick up. Leave a story or photo of Thurston on our Facebook page and we’ll let you know by Tuesday if you’ve won.





Photos by Randall Garcia and Parker Fitzgerald

Thurston Moore played a live set at the Aladdin Theater in Portland last weekend. He’s left some signed wax and setlists at Ace Hotel Portland for some lucky folks to pick up. Leave a story or photo of Thurston on our Facebook page and we’ll let you know by Tuesday if you’ve won.



Photos by Randall Garcia and Parker Fitzgerald


Thurston Moore played at the Capitol Hill Block Party yesterday — he’s touring with his new solo album, Demolished Thoughts, and will be leaving a handful of signed records and set lists from the show at Ace Hotel Seattle for a few lucky guns. To win, post a photo or story about Mr. Moore on our Facebook page. We’ll let you know early next week how to collect your goods.
Ditto for Portland — Thurston and his band play the Aladdin tonight and he’ll be leaving more signed ephemera at Ace Hotel Portland. Post away and we’ll let you know if you’ve won.




Photos by Greg Scott

Thurston Moore played at the Capitol Hill Block Party yesterday — he’s touring with his new solo album, Demolished Thoughts, and will be leaving a handful of signed records and set lists from the show at Ace Hotel Seattle for a few lucky guns. To win, post a photo or story about Mr. Moore on our Facebook page. We’ll let you know early next week how to collect your goods.

Ditto for Portland — Thurston and his band play the Aladdin tonight and he’ll be leaving more signed ephemera at Ace Hotel Portland. Post away and we’ll let you know if you’ve won.



Photos by Greg Scott


INTERVIEW : THURSTON MOORE

Thurston Moore really needs no introduction — if music in the last 30 years matters to you, you know who he is. What you may or may not know is that he’s kicking off a tour with his third solo album, Demolished Thoughts. And that he does narration for National Geographic. And has a teenage daughter. He also recently taught poetry a workshop at Buddhist-inspired Naropa University. His music follows the same discordant, searching speck of light that poetry, and his life, do — sense doesn’t seem to matter, especially if it stands in the way of authenticity and previously undiscovered meaning.

We’re thrilled to see more work pouring forth and we’ll be following his shows up and down the West Coast for the next couple of weeks. After shows this weekend in Seattle (Friday) and Portland (Saturday), Thurston will leave momentos at each respective Ace Hotel — signed vinyl, set lists and other ephemera. We’ll be picking a few people to come claim them. Post a story or picture about Thurston — past, present or future — here, and we’ll announce winners early next week.

We had a chance to talk to Thurston about his album, solo work, side hustles and what he’d rather be doing.

You’re touring with a new solo album — it looks like your first one was in 1995 and then it was, I think, over a decade until the next solo and then that was only four years ago.

Yeah, I was a little busy. Sonic Youth tends to be kind a juggernaut. Once it gets going…

How you find time for solo work, and when you put solo albums out, is it just about having enough songs or about you telling a kind of story?

Yeah, each of those records was sort of about wanting to document a more personal period of time and I wanted to do it as less of a democratic band thing. I wanted it to be something that I completely oversaw; it didn’t really have to be a collaboration so much. Even though I ultimately do collaborate with the other musicians on the solo record and whoever else works on it, but it’s all my call as far as what’s being produced. I don’t know, it’s just a matter of time. I don’t really think about it in any kind of careerist kind of way like I have a solo career that sort of exists. It has more to do with documenting personal ideas and that’s about it. At first, the record in 1995, it was so long ago, and it just was sort of an exercise. I wanted to do a record that was really stripped down and minimal than a lot of song concepts that exist before I introduce them to Sonic Youth when they become more worked on and people come up with their own parts. And I sort of liked the idea of having a record with that title. It sort of started with the title, that I wanted to do a record called Psychic Hearts and it sort of took off from there. There were some lyrics I was working on, and some writing. 

The second album was 2007 and again that record was basically about wanting to do a record that was called Trees Outside the Academy. Again I came up with all this writing I was doing and wanting to build some sort of personal solo record. I mean this new record is probably the most intense record to this degree. 

What do you mean by that?

Well, just the fact that I really wanted it to be this record that was focused on this one period of time for me and it was kind of dealing with sort of personal issues and stuff like that. It had a more removed feeling — I kind of hide things with more abstraction in the words, I guess. I don’t know. That was the feeling I was getting, I felt a little exposed in a way on this record. And it was also, just I didn’t really know what I was doing. I mean I basically sort of write all these songs and I’m not quite sure what I want to do. I was just going to do it myself in my living room. It was really gratuitous last summer running into Beck and talking to him about it and having him offer his services. It became what was…meant to be. I was really happy with what happened. It became less of a neurotic experience and more of a…I don’t know, he certainly gave it some kind of brightness.

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