Scared clean. 


Casco Viejo, Panama
Panama City’s sixth annual MACROFEST — a grand, multidisciplinary celebration of contemporary culture held in the city’s historical district — is now in full swing in Casco Viejo.
We’re happy to be lending a hand with this year’s festival, whose core initiative engages young artists locally and around the world. We’ll be exhibiting Panamanian artists Jonathan Harker & Donna Conlon's video piece Domino Effect — a portrait of present day Casco Antiguo, in which the camera tracks a succession of antique colonial era bricks in a chain reaction through the neighborhood’s streets. The piece will be projected tonight at 7pm across the surface of the Iglesia La Merced in front of American Trade Hotel.
We are also hosting a photo exhibition through March 15 with Chilean street style photographer Majo Arévalo, whose Viste La Calle blog keeps pulse with the inspired looks of modern South America.

Casco Viejo, Panama

Panama City’s sixth annual MACROFEST — a grand, multidisciplinary celebration of contemporary culture held in the city’s historical district — is now in full swing in Casco Viejo.

We’re happy to be lending a hand with this year’s festival, whose core initiative engages young artists locally and around the world. We’ll be exhibiting Panamanian artists Jonathan Harker & Donna Conlon's video piece Domino Effect — a portrait of present day Casco Antiguo, in which the camera tracks a succession of antique colonial era bricks in a chain reaction through the neighborhood’s streets. The piece will be projected tonight at 7pm across the surface of the Iglesia La Merced in front of American Trade Hotel.

We are also hosting a photo exhibition through March 15 with Chilean street style photographer Majo Arévalo, whose Viste La Calle blog keeps pulse with the inspired looks of modern South America.


London, UK
A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.
How do you see yourself?
I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)
How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.
What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…
What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.
A secret power you would like to have?
              
To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…
All photos by Cheryl Dunn.

London, UK

A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.

How do you see yourself?

I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)

How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.

What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…

What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.

A secret power you would like to have?

              

To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…

All photos by Cheryl Dunn.


Providence, Rhode Island

In Choros — a beautiful homage to Norman McLaren’s 1968 Pas de Deux — each movement executed by dancer Terah Maher builds to create the apparition of a chorus of dancers completing each other’s path, reminding the spectator of the intricate relationship between time and space, and the eye’s occasional role as illusionist.

Directed by Michael Langan with music by Steve Reich.


During last year’s edition of Content and as part of our ongoing Thinking Cap series — a collaborative and curious inquiry into the creative process — we entered the inner lair of Emily Baker and Kerby Ferris. Emily is the designer and curator of Sword + Fern, and makes some of the most beautiful and unique jewelry and other odds and ends around, and together with sound artist Kerby Ferris forms the band Lavender Mirror. We lingered while they crafted Youjoy, an installation project for the event and a living testament to their amazing brains and creative know-how. Our friend Johnny Le crafted this ode to the experience.

See all our Thinking Caps here, and share something about your creative process with us with #athinkingcap and @acehotel. We’ll keep an eye out.

On Saturday, we’ll host our fourth Content event on the second floor of Ace Hotel Portland. We’re clearing out the rooms and filling them each with the best designers and crafters in town — and if you want to bring something home we’ll have a pop-up shop in The Cleaners.

For full information about the event and its participants, visit our calendar.

Tickets are available for advance purchase here.


#YASSSS


Craft in America : FORGE premieres on PBS October 25, making inquiries into the physical, creative and intellectual processes of the world’s celebrated and unsung metalsmiths.


Collage sorceress Wangechi Mutu presents her latest exhibition now through early March at the Brooklyn Museum.


John Prine, it’s your birthday. Can’t believe we get to share time on the planet with you.


Phone Bloks is an open-source, eco-friendly and ridiculously innovative new take on the mobile phone. Read up and give them a shout out.


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