Portland, OR
It arrived in hundreds of small cardboard boxes, each carefully catalogued and classified — butterfly-pinned pieces of untreated filth and detritus collected from the gutters of New York City. Yuji Agematsu’s thirty-plus year practice is as simple as it is incomprehensible: thousands of small pieces of trash amassed and displayed in maximalist, unadulterated formulations. It’s breathtakingly, disgustingly beautiful. 

Agematsu first large-scale, institutional show is coming to Portland this weekend thanks to Yale Union — the high-minded, occasionally inscrutable arts center that’s challenged and confounded Portland’s arts community for the better part of five years.

Built at the turn of the century as an industrial laundry, the imposing, two-story brick facade takes up over half a city block in Southeast Portland — enclosing a sprawling, well-windowed interior that emanates a kind of God-light during daylight hours. The building’s been transformed under the command of a tight-knit, visionary cooperative into something strange and special — a bold, internationally recognized contemporary art institution that’s unlike anything else in the city. It’s an uncompromisingly rough treasure, and a perfect partner for Agematsu’s heady works. 
The show opens April 26 and runs through June 29.

Portland, OR

It arrived in hundreds of small cardboard boxes, each carefully catalogued and classified — butterfly-pinned pieces of untreated filth and detritus collected from the gutters of New York City. Yuji Agematsu’s thirty-plus year practice is as simple as it is incomprehensible: thousands of small pieces of trash amassed and displayed in maximalist, unadulterated formulations. It’s breathtakingly, disgustingly beautiful. 

Agematsu first large-scale, institutional show is coming to Portland this weekend thanks to Yale Union — the high-minded, occasionally inscrutable arts center that’s challenged and confounded Portland’s arts community for the better part of five years.

Built at the turn of the century as an industrial laundry, the imposing, two-story brick facade takes up over half a city block in Southeast Portland — enclosing a sprawling, well-windowed interior that emanates a kind of God-light during daylight hours. The building’s been transformed under the command of a tight-knit, visionary cooperative into something strange and special — a bold, internationally recognized contemporary art institution that’s unlike anything else in the city. It’s an uncompromisingly rough treasure, and a perfect partner for Agematsu’s heady works.

The show opens April 26 and runs through June 29.





Stills from tonight’s screening of Helke Sander's The All-Around Reduced Personality (1978) at YU in Portland as part of their two month Marianne Wex exhibition.
Born in 1937, Sander founded the Coalition for the Liberation of Women in 1968 and co-founded the women’s group Bread and Roses in 1972. The speech she delivered at a 1968 conference of Socialist German Students, which argued that the students’ movement reflected the sexism of its time, is widely credited as the spark that began the New German Women’s Movement. In 1974, Sander founded Frauen und Film, the first European feminist film journal. This, her first feature-length film, received the Prix de l’Âge d’Or at the Brussels Film Festival in 1978. Helke Sander is still active making films, writing, and teaching.
The screening is this evening at 7, and the exhibition is on show until December 15. Get ye!

Stills from tonight’s screening of Helke Sander's The All-Around Reduced Personality (1978) at YU in Portland as part of their two month Marianne Wex exhibition.

Born in 1937, Sander founded the Coalition for the Liberation of Women in 1968 and co-founded the women’s group Bread and Roses in 1972. The speech she delivered at a 1968 conference of Socialist German Students, which argued that the students’ movement reflected the sexism of its time, is widely credited as the spark that began the New German Women’s Movement. In 1974, Sander founded Frauen und Film, the first European feminist film journal. This, her first feature-length film, received the Prix de l’Âge d’Or at the Brussels Film Festival in 1978. Helke Sander is still active making films, writing, and teaching.

The screening is this evening at 7, and the exhibition is on show until December 15. Get ye!


YU & FearNoMusic present 100 Years of John Cage tonight in Portland. You can get ticket information here.


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