Los Angeles, CA

The inaugural issue of Ren Quarterlya court-side compendium from editor Ben Taylor and creative director Davor Krvavac focused on Basketball in L.A. and beyond — hits the stands any minute now.

You can pre-order your very own today.


Downtown LA
Claire L. Evans looking like a million bucks in Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles’ photo booth.
Claire’s CV runneth over: she fronts utopia-pop outfit YACHT, is the editor-in-chief of the recent reboot of beloved science journal OMNI, and — along with YACHT co-hort/life-partner Jona Bechtolt — recently introduced the nimble, L.A.-centric events app 5 Every Day. Happy she was able to sit still for a few minutes.

Downtown LA

Claire L. Evans looking like a million bucks in Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles’ photo booth.

Claire’s CV runneth over: she fronts utopia-pop outfit YACHT, is the editor-in-chief of the recent reboot of beloved science journal OMNI, and — along with YACHT co-hort/life-partner Jona Bechtolt — recently introduced the nimble, L.A.-centric events app 5 Every Day. Happy she was able to sit still for a few minutes.


Downtown Los Angeles

"Love Me Like I’m Not Made Of Stone," from Lykke Li’s forthcoming I Never Learn.

Tickets for Lykke’s May 19 show at The Theatre at Ace Hotel, sponsored by Martin Guitar, go on sale tomorrow morning at 10am PST.


Downtown Los Angeles, California
A show we’ve anticipated for quite some time opened nearby our new house lately. We found ourselves there with an old friend, Brian who wrote about his time there and shared it with us to share with you. How nice.
Last Thursday was the opening of “The Mothership, In Our Details are the Maps of Existence” at Dilettante in Downtown Los Angeles. I don’t have a nice camera, so I used the 10-megapixel Nikon Coolpix L20 I bought as a throw-away on a trip to Prague in 2010. According to the official description, “The Mothership is a vessel that guides and carries smaller vessels … a symbol of the collective conscience form, which we, as individuals, draw creativity and inspiration from.” The show, which features work from a selection of female artists, is intended as a celebration of that vessel. 
A giant spider made of Swarovski Crystals greets us just inside the door. This is Eye Walker by Amanda Charchian.  I ask Amanda what her piece is about, and she sighs, then responds “It’s based on a Native American myth about the eye walker. It’s about magic.  Good magic — white magic. Sympathetic magic.” When I ask Amanda if she got frustrated stringing together all the little crystals, she stares, deadpan. “No. It’s a meditative process.”

Next to the spider, a bunch of glitter-coated knives are stuck into the wall. This isGiving in to All My Best Qualities by Lola Rose Thompson. Lola and Amanda went to Otis around the same time; they are good friends.

Lola steals my camera to take a picture of Amanda with the glittery knives. Lola is not pictured, but she is also very good-looking.

I run into my friend Shane who tells me that “The stuff upstairs is really dope,” so we go upstairs.  The stuff up there is really dope. 
 
From the balcony, I see this dude examining the piece on the floor.  I go downstairs to talk to him.  His name is Jack.  I ask Jack about his feelings on the piece.  Jack thinks for a moment and replies, “It made me feel like a jazz riff. It’s a dancey piece, like a bunch of movement on the floor.” The piece is called Jazz Riff #1 by Lita Albuquerque.

This is Single Camera by Alia Shawkat. Alia says it was inspired by "a really bad audition I had one time. This guy," she points to the man painted red in the upper right corner, "he hated me. He was a producer. And this woman over here is a producer, that’s why she’s holding ‘CONTENT’." 

Artist and event organizer Carly Jo Morgan stressed that she did not curate by selecting specific works. "I picked women who inspire me, gave out the theme, and let them go." Carly is herself currently a mothership.

I find Jacqueline Suskin of the Poem Store. You have seen her in the galleries and farmers’ markets of Los Angeles. On the wall behind her is her piece The Poet & The Timber Baron. I ask Jacqueline to write a poem about this show. Here is what she wrote:
 

Downtown Los Angeles, California

A show we’ve anticipated for quite some time opened nearby our new house lately. We found ourselves there with an old friend, Brian who wrote about his time there and shared it with us to share with you. How nice.

Last Thursday was the opening of “The Mothership, In Our Details are the Maps of Existence” at Dilettante in Downtown Los Angeles. I don’t have a nice camera, so I used the 10-megapixel Nikon Coolpix L20 I bought as a throw-away on a trip to Prague in 2010. According to the official description, “The Mothership is a vessel that guides and carries smaller vessels … a symbol of the collective conscience form, which we, as individuals, draw creativity and inspiration from.” The show, which features work from a selection of female artists, is intended as a celebration of that vessel. 

A giant spider made of Swarovski Crystals greets us just inside the door. This is Eye Walker by Amanda Charchian.  I ask Amanda what her piece is about, and she sighs, then responds “It’s based on a Native American myth about the eye walker. It’s about magic.  Good magic — white magic. Sympathetic magic.” When I ask Amanda if she got frustrated stringing together all the little crystals, she stares, deadpan. “No. It’s a meditative process.”

Next to the spider, a bunch of glitter-coated knives are stuck into the wall. This isGiving in to All My Best Qualities by Lola Rose Thompson. Lola and Amanda went to Otis around the same time; they are good friends.

Lola steals my camera to take a picture of Amanda with the glittery knives. Lola is not pictured, but she is also very good-looking.

I run into my friend Shane who tells me that “The stuff upstairs is really dope,” so we go upstairs.  The stuff up there is really dope. 

From the balcony, I see this dude examining the piece on the floor.  I go downstairs to talk to him.  His name is Jack.  I ask Jack about his feelings on the piece.  Jack thinks for a moment and replies, “It made me feel like a jazz riff. It’s a dancey piece, like a bunch of movement on the floor.” The piece is called Jazz Riff #1 by Lita Albuquerque.

This is Single Camera by Alia Shawkat. Alia says it was inspired by "a really bad audition I had one time. This guy," she points to the man painted red in the upper right corner, "he hated me. He was a producer. And this woman over here is a producer, that’s why she’s holding ‘CONTENT’."

Artist and event organizer Carly Jo Morgan stressed that she did not curate by selecting specific works. "I picked women who inspire me, gave out the theme, and let them go." Carly is herself currently a mothership.

I find Jacqueline Suskin of the Poem Store. You have seen her in the galleries and farmers’ markets of Los Angeles. On the wall behind her is her piece The Poet & The Timber Baron. I ask Jacqueline to write a poem about this show. Here is what she wrote:

 


Inspired by his trip Upstairs, Eric Rosner shared this illustration with us.

Inspired by his trip Upstairs, Eric Rosner shared this illustration with us.


Downtown Los Angeles, California
With a common commitment to the revitalization of Downtown Los Angeles’ artistic and cultural vitality, we’re very excited to announce that we’ve joined forces with our friends at L.A. Dance Project. We’re so pleased to welcome such a passionate and inspiring team into our beloved Theater — a magical space we feel fits hand in glove with the company’s world-renowned artistry. It’s a match made in heaven.
On February 20, 21 and 22, the collective — founded by renowned choreographer and dancer Benjamin Millepied, along with founding producer Charles Fabius, composers Nico Muhly and Nicholas Britell and art consultant Matthieu Humery — will perform three works at The Theatre at Ace Hotel. The program includes U.S. premieres of Reflections choreographed by Benjamin Millepied with music by David Lang and visual concepts by Barbara Kruger, and Murder Ballads by Justin Peck with music by Bryce Dessner of The National and visual concepts by Sterling Ruby. These two works will be paired with an exclusive sneak-peek of a new piece by Hiroaki Umeda, in preparation for its upcoming premiere in Paris in March 2014.
We cannot wait to see it, and all that’s sure to come.
Pre-sale tickets for L.A. Dance Project’s residency at The Theatre at Ace Hotel will be available to Ace’s A-list mailing list subscribers on Wednesday, January 15th, with sales to the public beginning on Thursday, January 16th. More information and tickets can be found at acehotel.com/theatre.
Photo credit: Laurent Philippe

Downtown Los Angeles, California

With a common commitment to the revitalization of Downtown Los Angeles’ artistic and cultural vitality, we’re very excited to announce that we’ve joined forces with our friends at L.A. Dance Project. We’re so pleased to welcome such a passionate and inspiring team into our beloved Theater — a magical space we feel fits hand in glove with the company’s world-renowned artistry. It’s a match made in heaven.

On February 20, 21 and 22, the collective — founded by renowned choreographer and dancer Benjamin Millepied, along with founding producer Charles Fabius, composers Nico Muhly and Nicholas Britell and art consultant Matthieu Humery — will perform three works at The Theatre at Ace Hotel. The program includes U.S. premieres of Reflections choreographed by Benjamin Millepied with music by David Lang and visual concepts by Barbara Kruger, and Murder Ballads by Justin Peck with music by Bryce Dessner of The National and visual concepts by Sterling Ruby. These two works will be paired with an exclusive sneak-peek of a new piece by Hiroaki Umeda, in preparation for its upcoming premiere in Paris in March 2014.

We cannot wait to see it, and all that’s sure to come.

Pre-sale tickets for L.A. Dance Project’s residency at The Theatre at Ace Hotel will be available to Ace’s A-list mailing list subscribers on Wednesday, January 15th, with sales to the public beginning on Thursday, January 16thMore information and tickets can be found at acehotel.com/theatre.

Photo credit: Laurent Philippe


Happy birthday Douglas Fairbanks Jr.

via the Million Dollar Theater


Eric Rosner sent this our way just in time for Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles to open reservations. Bookings available for January 15 and beyond.

Eric Rosner sent this our way just in time for Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles to open reservations. Bookings available for January 15 and beyond.


Photo by David Hochman for The New York Times
INTERVIEW : RON FINLEY : GUERRILLA GARDENER
Ron Finley doesn’t live in a Los Angeles zip code where buzzwords likeorganic and heirloom rule the supermarket. So a couple years back he took matter into his own hands and planted a sidewalk garden to cut down on his grocery commute times, earning him a citation from the city. His subsequent efforts to fight City Hall earned him an audience, then a TED talk that instantly made him the public face of the farm-to-table movement in underserved areas. The city of LA has since backed off, leading to enormous potential in a city with up to 26 square miles of vacant lots. But nowadays he’s thinking on a global scale. We caught up with him to talk about the ups and downs of being an overnight vegetable king and where he goes from here.
Were you surprised by the instant celebrity that you had after the TED talk? 
A little surprised, but you definitely got to be prepared or it could suck you under like an undertow or something. Fortunately, I have a motto, when we used to train we’d say, “If you stay ready, you ain’t got to get ready.” 
Beyond winning a moratorium on the ban on parkway planting, is the city of LA more on board with what you’re doing now?
Totally on board. They want to create a shift in food access. My thing is LA should be one of the healthiest cities on the planet and the folks I was talking to feel the same way. LA is for innovators and that’s what we need to bring back, to where we are the innovators and we’re not checking for nobody because everybody is checking for us. What are they doing in LA? That’s what I want to bring. LA is the place where things happen big.
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You have a unique aesthetic as a gardener. What kinds of things inspire you to plant what you do, how you do it? 
I’m inspired by life. I’m inspired by air. The simplest thing on the planet, you can’t even see it, but it’s the thing we all need more than anything else and that’s my inspiration. I don’t really go out and design a place, I let it tell me what to do.
When people ask me, “Where should this go?” I’m like, “I don’t know. Where do you want to put it?” People need to let go of the books and let their body, let nature take over because we are nature. We need to stop separating ourselves from the butterflies and the bumblebees and the flowers, we’re nature. We decompose just like they do. “Where do you feel it should go?” Feel it, there’s no book. The hell with the book, throw the book away. When you walk out of your door, where do you want this? Where do you want to see this? What do you want to be greeted with? The same way when you design a path, walk it first. If it don’t feel comfortable it’s not right. Nothing in nature is really straight. 
How important is the visual aspect relative to the nutritional? 
The visual feeds you too. We are all artists, some of us just lose it and forget it. Everybody is born an artist, it’s still there. You need to feed that creativity and that’s what a garden lets you do. A garden is nothing but a metaphor for life. Everything that happens in life happens in that garden, everything. From you planting the seed, to you taking care of what comes out of that seed. It needs nutrients, it needs to be nurtured and you get a healthy plant. Everything is in there, [all the way] to compost, which is to me the rebirth. 
Do you think we’re in a good moment as far as changing the way we eat?
We’re in a hell of a place right now. I get hits, inquiries and inspiring notes from New Zealand to Florida to Chicago to Canada to Italy, all over the world. It’s definitely happening. People want to take their food back. It’s almost impossible to not know somebody with a curable food related disease. I think right now we’re at a good point where people are waking up and wanting to grow their own food. 
The hands-on of growing your own as cultural experience must help change attitudes towards what you eat.
Right, the thing with putting your hands in the dirt. That’s what we are, that’s where we’re from. We decompose just like that leaf does. I think that’s the lesson, I think that’s why people have these epiphanies when they get into the soil and it effects people. What’s next? 
Well I’m opening SXSW Eco, [and presenting at] TEDYouth, New Zealand and Brazil. I’m working on some plans with Alice Waters, the godmother of the whole slow-food movement, where we’re trying to decide how we’re going to take over the world up in Berkeley. It’s a diabolical master plan, that’s all I can say for now.

Photo by David Hochman for The New York Times

INTERVIEW : RON FINLEY : GUERRILLA GARDENER

Ron Finley doesn’t live in a Los Angeles zip code where buzzwords likeorganic and heirloom rule the supermarket. So a couple years back he took matter into his own hands and planted a sidewalk garden to cut down on his grocery commute times, earning him a citation from the city. His subsequent efforts to fight City Hall earned him an audience, then a TED talk that instantly made him the public face of the farm-to-table movement in underserved areas. The city of LA has since backed off, leading to enormous potential in a city with up to 26 square miles of vacant lots. But nowadays he’s thinking on a global scale. We caught up with him to talk about the ups and downs of being an overnight vegetable king and where he goes from here.

Were you surprised by the instant celebrity that you had after the TED talk? 

A little surprised, but you definitely got to be prepared or it could suck you under like an undertow or something. Fortunately, I have a motto, when we used to train we’d say, “If you stay ready, you ain’t got to get ready.” 

Beyond winning a moratorium on the ban on parkway planting, is the city of LA more on board with what you’re doing now?

Totally on board. They want to create a shift in food access. My thing is LA should be one of the healthiest cities on the planet and the folks I was talking to feel the same way. LA is for innovators and that’s what we need to bring back, to where we are the innovators and we’re not checking for nobody because everybody is checking for us. What are they doing in LA? That’s what I want to bring. LA is the place where things happen big.

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