Downtown Los Angeles, California
With a common commitment to the revitalization of Downtown Los Angeles’ artistic and cultural vitality, we’re very excited to announce that we’ve joined forces with our friends at L.A. Dance Project. We’re so pleased to welcome such a passionate and inspiring team into our beloved Theater — a magical space we feel fits hand in glove with the company’s world-renowned artistry. It’s a match made in heaven.
On February 20, 21 and 22, the collective — founded by renowned choreographer and dancer Benjamin Millepied, along with founding producer Charles Fabius, composers Nico Muhly and Nicholas Britell and art consultant Matthieu Humery — will perform three works at The Theatre at Ace Hotel. The program includes U.S. premieres of Reflections choreographed by Benjamin Millepied with music by David Lang and visual concepts by Barbara Kruger, and Murder Ballads by Justin Peck with music by Bryce Dessner of The National and visual concepts by Sterling Ruby. These two works will be paired with an exclusive sneak-peek of a new piece by Hiroaki Umeda, in preparation for its upcoming premiere in Paris in March 2014.
We cannot wait to see it, and all that’s sure to come.
Pre-sale tickets for L.A. Dance Project’s residency at The Theatre at Ace Hotel will be available to Ace’s A-list mailing list subscribers on Wednesday, January 15th, with sales to the public beginning on Thursday, January 16th. More information and tickets can be found at acehotel.com/theatre.
Photo credit: Laurent Philippe

Downtown Los Angeles, California

With a common commitment to the revitalization of Downtown Los Angeles’ artistic and cultural vitality, we’re very excited to announce that we’ve joined forces with our friends at L.A. Dance Project. We’re so pleased to welcome such a passionate and inspiring team into our beloved Theater — a magical space we feel fits hand in glove with the company’s world-renowned artistry. It’s a match made in heaven.

On February 20, 21 and 22, the collective — founded by renowned choreographer and dancer Benjamin Millepied, along with founding producer Charles Fabius, composers Nico Muhly and Nicholas Britell and art consultant Matthieu Humery — will perform three works at The Theatre at Ace Hotel. The program includes U.S. premieres of Reflections choreographed by Benjamin Millepied with music by David Lang and visual concepts by Barbara Kruger, and Murder Ballads by Justin Peck with music by Bryce Dessner of The National and visual concepts by Sterling Ruby. These two works will be paired with an exclusive sneak-peek of a new piece by Hiroaki Umeda, in preparation for its upcoming premiere in Paris in March 2014.

We cannot wait to see it, and all that’s sure to come.

Pre-sale tickets for L.A. Dance Project’s residency at The Theatre at Ace Hotel will be available to Ace’s A-list mailing list subscribers on Wednesday, January 15th, with sales to the public beginning on Thursday, January 16thMore information and tickets can be found at acehotel.com/theatre.

Photo credit: Laurent Philippe


Happy birthday Douglas Fairbanks Jr.

via the Million Dollar Theater


Eric Rosner sent this our way just in time for Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles to open reservations. Bookings available for January 15 and beyond.

Eric Rosner sent this our way just in time for Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles to open reservations. Bookings available for January 15 and beyond.


Photo by David Hochman for The New York Times
INTERVIEW : RON FINLEY : GUERRILLA GARDENER
Ron Finley doesn’t live in a Los Angeles zip code where buzzwords likeorganic and heirloom rule the supermarket. So a couple years back he took matter into his own hands and planted a sidewalk garden to cut down on his grocery commute times, earning him a citation from the city. His subsequent efforts to fight City Hall earned him an audience, then a TED talk that instantly made him the public face of the farm-to-table movement in underserved areas. The city of LA has since backed off, leading to enormous potential in a city with up to 26 square miles of vacant lots. But nowadays he’s thinking on a global scale. We caught up with him to talk about the ups and downs of being an overnight vegetable king and where he goes from here.
Were you surprised by the instant celebrity that you had after the TED talk? 
A little surprised, but you definitely got to be prepared or it could suck you under like an undertow or something. Fortunately, I have a motto, when we used to train we’d say, “If you stay ready, you ain’t got to get ready.” 
Beyond winning a moratorium on the ban on parkway planting, is the city of LA more on board with what you’re doing now?
Totally on board. They want to create a shift in food access. My thing is LA should be one of the healthiest cities on the planet and the folks I was talking to feel the same way. LA is for innovators and that’s what we need to bring back, to where we are the innovators and we’re not checking for nobody because everybody is checking for us. What are they doing in LA? That’s what I want to bring. LA is the place where things happen big.
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You have a unique aesthetic as a gardener. What kinds of things inspire you to plant what you do, how you do it? 
I’m inspired by life. I’m inspired by air. The simplest thing on the planet, you can’t even see it, but it’s the thing we all need more than anything else and that’s my inspiration. I don’t really go out and design a place, I let it tell me what to do.
When people ask me, “Where should this go?” I’m like, “I don’t know. Where do you want to put it?” People need to let go of the books and let their body, let nature take over because we are nature. We need to stop separating ourselves from the butterflies and the bumblebees and the flowers, we’re nature. We decompose just like they do. “Where do you feel it should go?” Feel it, there’s no book. The hell with the book, throw the book away. When you walk out of your door, where do you want this? Where do you want to see this? What do you want to be greeted with? The same way when you design a path, walk it first. If it don’t feel comfortable it’s not right. Nothing in nature is really straight. 
How important is the visual aspect relative to the nutritional? 
The visual feeds you too. We are all artists, some of us just lose it and forget it. Everybody is born an artist, it’s still there. You need to feed that creativity and that’s what a garden lets you do. A garden is nothing but a metaphor for life. Everything that happens in life happens in that garden, everything. From you planting the seed, to you taking care of what comes out of that seed. It needs nutrients, it needs to be nurtured and you get a healthy plant. Everything is in there, [all the way] to compost, which is to me the rebirth. 
Do you think we’re in a good moment as far as changing the way we eat?
We’re in a hell of a place right now. I get hits, inquiries and inspiring notes from New Zealand to Florida to Chicago to Canada to Italy, all over the world. It’s definitely happening. People want to take their food back. It’s almost impossible to not know somebody with a curable food related disease. I think right now we’re at a good point where people are waking up and wanting to grow their own food. 
The hands-on of growing your own as cultural experience must help change attitudes towards what you eat.
Right, the thing with putting your hands in the dirt. That’s what we are, that’s where we’re from. We decompose just like that leaf does. I think that’s the lesson, I think that’s why people have these epiphanies when they get into the soil and it effects people. What’s next? 
Well I’m opening SXSW Eco, [and presenting at] TEDYouth, New Zealand and Brazil. I’m working on some plans with Alice Waters, the godmother of the whole slow-food movement, where we’re trying to decide how we’re going to take over the world up in Berkeley. It’s a diabolical master plan, that’s all I can say for now.

Photo by David Hochman for The New York Times

INTERVIEW : RON FINLEY : GUERRILLA GARDENER

Ron Finley doesn’t live in a Los Angeles zip code where buzzwords likeorganic and heirloom rule the supermarket. So a couple years back he took matter into his own hands and planted a sidewalk garden to cut down on his grocery commute times, earning him a citation from the city. His subsequent efforts to fight City Hall earned him an audience, then a TED talk that instantly made him the public face of the farm-to-table movement in underserved areas. The city of LA has since backed off, leading to enormous potential in a city with up to 26 square miles of vacant lots. But nowadays he’s thinking on a global scale. We caught up with him to talk about the ups and downs of being an overnight vegetable king and where he goes from here.

Were you surprised by the instant celebrity that you had after the TED talk? 

A little surprised, but you definitely got to be prepared or it could suck you under like an undertow or something. Fortunately, I have a motto, when we used to train we’d say, “If you stay ready, you ain’t got to get ready.” 

Beyond winning a moratorium on the ban on parkway planting, is the city of LA more on board with what you’re doing now?

Totally on board. They want to create a shift in food access. My thing is LA should be one of the healthiest cities on the planet and the folks I was talking to feel the same way. LA is for innovators and that’s what we need to bring back, to where we are the innovators and we’re not checking for nobody because everybody is checking for us. What are they doing in LA? That’s what I want to bring. LA is the place where things happen big.

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Astrid Kircherr was out with some friends in her native Hamburg one night in 1960 when they stepped into the Kaiserkeller and came face to face with rock n’ roll personified. In the next four years Kircherr documented the transformation of the original line-up of the Beatles from five to the Fab Four, from cherub-faced rockabilly youth to the centerpiece of probably the most viral explosion of global youth culture ever seen. The pictures she took in those days — before the Beatles were the Beatles — might as well be from a different world. In a way they are from a different world, though one whose orbit paralleled ours before “She Loves You” awakened some dormant spirit in the teenage mass and a new course put some drift between us. The Early Beatles Collection, including rarely seen photos taken by Kircherr between 1960-1964, opened today at the Leica Gallery Los Angeles and is up for a bit, stop by if you’re in the neighborhood.

Astrid Kircherr was out with some friends in her native Hamburg one night in 1960 when they stepped into the Kaiserkeller and came face to face with rock n’ roll personified. In the next four years Kircherr documented the transformation of the original line-up of the Beatles from five to the Fab Four, from cherub-faced rockabilly youth to the centerpiece of probably the most viral explosion of global youth culture ever seen. The pictures she took in those days — before the Beatles were the Beatles — might as well be from a different world. In a way they are from a different world, though one whose orbit paralleled ours before “She Loves You” awakened some dormant spirit in the teenage mass and a new course put some drift between us. The Early Beatles Collection, including rarely seen photos taken by Kircherr between 1960-1964, opened today at the Leica Gallery Los Angeles and is up for a bit, stop by if you’re in the neighborhood.


While under the spell of a cotija-dusted puffy taco at Chef Josef Centeno’s Bar Ama our minds’ eye takes a culinary-cum-Tree-of-Life style journey through foodways and space-time, into a place where corn is a giver of life, not a syrup for bonding disparate particles into pockets of infinite shelflife. In this dream-Eden, bell peppers swell like Dizzy Gillespie’s cheeks beneath a canopy of trees and oceans eddy with forests of kelp and untold schools of fish, unencumbered on their rounds by lost cities of PET. And when we touch back down in our seat back at Bar Ama the dream seems within reach.    

While under the spell of a cotija-dusted puffy taco at Chef Josef Centeno’s Bar Ama our minds’ eye takes a culinary-cum-Tree-of-Life style journey through foodways and space-time, into a place where corn is a giver of life, not a syrup for bonding disparate particles into pockets of infinite shelflife. In this dream-Eden, bell peppers swell like Dizzy Gillespie’s cheeks beneath a canopy of trees and oceans eddy with forests of kelp and untold schools of fish, unencumbered on their rounds by lost cities of PET. And when we touch back down in our seat back at Bar Ama the dream seems within reach.    


Photo by Lucas Jackson for Reuters
About a month ago President Obama took the podium in a couple small Midwestern towns and said that the “growing inequality” in America “isn’t just morally wrong, it’s bad economics.” He pledged to spend the rest of his term trying to right that situation and we wish him the best in that endeavor. The elevator to the American Dream has gotten so top heavy lately that for millions locked in the basement there’s no way up without a shiv. So for the Los Angeles area fast food workers walking out today, we quote Ralph Ellison who said “the truth is the light and light is the truth.” Godspeed. You have a posse.

Photo by Lucas Jackson for Reuters

About a month ago President Obama took the podium in a couple small Midwestern towns and said that the “growing inequality” in America “isn’t just morally wrong, it’s bad economics.” He pledged to spend the rest of his term trying to right that situation and we wish him the best in that endeavor. The elevator to the American Dream has gotten so top heavy lately that for millions locked in the basement there’s no way up without a shiv. So for the Los Angeles area fast food workers walking out today, we quote Ralph Ellison who said “the truth is the light and light is the truth.” Godspeed. You have a posse.


United Artists Theater — the site of the soon-to-be Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles — during a parade photographed for the cover of the 1936 Los Angeles City Planning Commission Report. On the marquis, Piccadilly Jim starring Robert Montgomery, Madge Evans and Frank Morgan, and Star For a Night with Claire Trevor.

United Artists Theater — the site of the soon-to-be Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles — during a parade photographed for the cover of the 1936 Los Angeles City Planning Commission Report. On the marquis, Piccadilly Jim starring Robert Montgomery, Madge Evans and Frank Morgan, and Star For a Night with Claire Trevor.


The house known as The Castle doesn’t haunt Downtown LA in corporeal form these days, but if you look up, and you’re prone to daydream, maybe you’ll see a faint outline through the summer haze. The sprawling Victorian mansion — a backdrop for noir films like Kiss Me Deadly and Criss Cross — was one of the last holdouts of the fated Bunker Hill neighborhood that disappeared in the 60s, when the Hill was flattened so the saw teeth of progress could jut skyward from the urban plain. But long before the Community Redevelopment Agency doomed Bunker Hill the Castle was believed to be haunted, possibly by one of several residents that met untimely ends. Scheduled at one point for demolition, the Castle was saved by public outcry, and moved whole, only to be destroyed by arson. Our theory is that the ghosts of Bunker Hill still wander the corridors of Downtown LA. 

The house known as The Castle doesn’t haunt Downtown LA in corporeal form these days, but if you look up, and you’re prone to daydream, maybe you’ll see a faint outline through the summer haze. The sprawling Victorian mansion — a backdrop for noir films like Kiss Me Deadly and Criss Cross — was one of the last holdouts of the fated Bunker Hill neighborhood that disappeared in the 60s, when the Hill was flattened so the saw teeth of progress could jut skyward from the urban plain. But long before the Community Redevelopment Agency doomed Bunker Hill the Castle was believed to be haunted, possibly by one of several residents that met untimely ends. Scheduled at one point for demolition, the Castle was saved by public outcry, and moved whole, only to be destroyed by arson. Our theory is that the ghosts of Bunker Hill still wander the corridors of Downtown LA. 


Sashiko needlecraft is but one of a bajillion wonderful things about Japanese culture celebrated during Nisei Week, an annual exaltation of the contributions of the Japanese community in Los Angeles. The festival’s roots go back to its first incarnation in 1934 in the Little Tokyo district, historically one of the largest hubs of the Japanese-American community on the American mainland.
This weekend you can explore authentic Japanese art forms at a series of free workshops in Kimekomi Dolls, Nanpu Kai Bonsai and traditional Japanese brush painting Saturday and Sunday at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center. While you’re there make sure to check out an exhibit of photographs by Tōyō Miyatake — who documented the tragedy faced by Little Tokyo during WWII, as well as the community’s strength, determination and survival. There’s a host of other events around town, like a Shōchū tasting, Kendo tournament and Ondo dance parade. So get out there and spread the Wa.

Sashiko needlecraft is but one of a bajillion wonderful things about Japanese culture celebrated during Nisei Week, an annual exaltation of the contributions of the Japanese community in Los Angeles. The festival’s roots go back to its first incarnation in 1934 in the Little Tokyo district, historically one of the largest hubs of the Japanese-American community on the American mainland.

This weekend you can explore authentic Japanese art forms at a series of free workshops in Kimekomi Dolls, Nanpu Kai Bonsai and traditional Japanese brush painting Saturday and Sunday at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center. While you’re there make sure to check out an exhibit of photographs by Tōyō Miyatake — who documented the tragedy faced by Little Tokyo during WWII, as well as the community’s strength, determination and survival. There’s a host of other events around town, like a Shōchū tasting, Kendo tournament and Ondo dance parade. So get out there and spread the Wa.


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