Shoreditch, London
Our dear friend and healer Yona Kanzen is back, and she’s brought a few natural tranquilizers with her. 
The world’s a stressful place, and we need all the help we can get bringing calm to the storm.
Here are a couple of tips you can use to destress yourself.
• Place your hands directly below your belly button
• Close your eyes and breathe in from your nose
• Breath out from your mouth whilst touching your top teeth with your tongue
Whilst doing this breathing technique, you should feel the cold air going through your throat — getting warmer as it goes down to the stomach, and reaching your hands below the belly button. Keep it there for a few seconds, releasing the hot air though the mouth. Do this a few times and relax. You should feel your stomach expand with this exercise.  
For Sleeplessness
If you cannot get to sleep, here is a tip that usually works:
Fill a large bowl with hot water and mix it with a cup of salt. Once the salt is dissolved into the water, place your feet into the bowl and leave to soak for about five minutes. If your body starts palpitating, remove your feet from the water immediately. Go to bed as soon as this is done to get the best results.

Shoreditch, London

Our dear friend and healer Yona Kanzen is back, and she’s brought a few natural tranquilizers with her. 

The world’s a stressful place, and we need all the help we can get bringing calm to the storm.

Here are a couple of tips you can use to destress yourself.

Place your hands directly below your belly button

Close your eyes and breathe in from your nose

Breath out from your mouth whilst touching your top teeth with your tongue

Whilst doing this breathing technique, you should feel the cold air going through your throat — getting warmer as it goes down to the stomach, and reaching your hands below the belly button. Keep it there for a few seconds, releasing the hot air though the mouth. Do this a few times and relax. You should feel your stomach expand with this exercise.  

For Sleeplessness

If you cannot get to sleep, here is a tip that usually works:

Fill a large bowl with hot water and mix it with a cup of salt. Once the salt is dissolved into the water, place your feet into the bowl and leave to soak for about five minutes. If your body starts palpitating, remove your feet from the water immediately. Go to bed as soon as this is done to get the best results.


New York City

John Fahey made his guitar sound open as the American West, and with his hands he massaged an aural optimism from wood and metal that had seen the darkness, but decided to remain in light, as they say.

Tonight at Ace Outpost NYC Steve Lowenthal will be launching his biography Dance of Death: The Life of John Fahey. David Fricke is going to say a little something. Music. All of it.  


Downtown Los Angeles
Takashi Murakami and some unidentified revelers celebrate Friday’s screening of Jellyfish Eyes at The Theatre at Ace Hotel. 
Photo courtesy of riyo_oko

Downtown Los Angeles

Takashi Murakami and some unidentified revelers celebrate Friday’s screening of Jellyfish Eyes at The Theatre at Ace Hotel. 

Photo courtesy of riyo_oko


Downtown Los Angeles
Are you a person, dear reader? Well well. Good news. Along with JD Samson, we’re throwing a Pride party for people. It’s the first leg of our four-stop tour to bring everyone we can together to dance and smile and love and sweat. If you can’t wait till this weekend, JD made a mix called — and for — All of Us. It just keeps getting better. See you on the dance floor. 

Downtown Los Angeles

Are you a person, dear reader? Well well. Good news. Along with JD Samson, we’re throwing a Pride party for people. It’s the first leg of our four-stop tour to bring everyone we can together to dance and smile and love and sweat. If you can’t wait till this weekend, JD made a mix called — and for — All of Us. It just keeps getting better. See you on the dance floor. 


London

Mr. X here talking about the meaning of self, tattooing, life and fatherhood. That minimal piano music you hear in the background is by Russ Chimes. Alex Nicholson makes the tattoos of Mr. X slowly melt into his skin throughout the film.  

Tattooing has been in important part of human cultures for over 5000 years. From the aristocracy in England to sea-farers the world over to indigenous peoples on most every continent, it’s been a way to distinguish and express ourselves. It’s nice to hear such a soft and connected voice speaking about how meaningful it is to commit to a piece of art for one’s life. Tattoos are the only artform that change with a person throughout their life, slowly blurring and melding with the skin.     

"I like the black ink in the skin. ‘Cos it’s not really black — it’s this funny bluish stuff. It’s India ink — it’s basically carbon. Which is what we’re made of." 


Do you like animals with red eyes, house music and what could in fact be the visual representation of Leibniz's monads? Us too. Universal Everything made a video combining them. Tonight we’re going to take a walk around the hotel with our headphones on. We’ll be envisioning this video projected over darkened buildings and streets as we traipse the town.  


Portland, OR
John Jay is everywhere, like a feeling, or like air, and he might have even invented #hashtags. More important: he’s a good friend and move-buster and a mind with that hair-trigger twitch to engage culture in all its shapeshifting splendor.
Leading up to his talk at Semi-Permanent he spoke with Marketing Magazine about creativity and culture and his relationship with our dear, dear departed Alex. 

Photo by Matthew Furman

Portland, OR

John Jay is everywhere, like a feeling, or like air, and he might have even invented #hashtags. More important: he’s a good friend and move-buster and a mind with that hair-trigger twitch to engage culture in all its shapeshifting splendor.

Leading up to his talk at Semi-Permanent he spoke with Marketing Magazine about creativity and culture and his relationship with our dear, dear departed Alex. 

Photo by Matthew Furman


New York City

The great artist is their own greatest creation, they say. If you’ve dipped down below the street in New York City where the cell phone don’t shine, and if you got to where you wanted to get, you’ve been influenced by his work designing New York’s simple and eye-catching subway map. Massimo Vignelli was generous, driven, and worked to make life more beautiful for himself and for the people in this world.

Mr. Vignelli understood that beauty is a way of seeing things in the world. Proportion, balance, space — the movement of the eye — these things are free, simple and clean. You can learn to see them by slowing down, paying attention, savoring the details. His work helped make our world more beautiful, and a world filled with beauty is a place we all want to care for, participate in, where there’s somehow more time to see and do together.  

Massimo Vignelli made things. But more importantly, he brought us closer to one another. Today we’re writing all our thank yous and goodbyes to him in Helvetica.  




You have not grown too old 
and it is not too late
to dive into your increasing depths
where life calmly gives out
its own secret

― Rainer Maria Rilke
Swimmers by Wayne Levin.

You have not grown too old 

and it is not too late

to dive into your increasing depths

where life calmly gives out

its own secret

― Rainer Maria Rilke

Swimmers by Wayne Levin.


Portland, OR
Dilettante’s not a word you’d normally conjure up to compliment. But there’s something in Stephanie Simek's restless digressions that makes the idea of artful inexperience seem kind of revolutionary. Her muse sends her headlong into arcane and circuitous studies of natural science — flirting with botany, circuitry, crystallography, electro-magnetics, phosphorescent algae husbandry — self-sufficient sojourns into worlds wading just deep enough for her exquisite purposes.

"Radio Room," a functional, gallery-sized crystal radio composed of copper, fool’s gold, steel and paper. 
Her work’s got a wide breadth — spread out across sound art, conceptual fine art, a fantastical jewelry line and most recently her own line of fragrances. She’s made circuitry triggered by the behavior of venus flytraps, quail eggs lined with gold, a room-sized radio made from copper and crystals, a strangely well-publicized eyelash necklace made from human hair and countless other curios. In everything, Stephanie’s tactile creations share a common curiosity with the wonders of the natural world — an imaginative distillation of scientific complexities into their most elemental forms. 

Necklace sculpted from the Mitsumata branch, traditionally used in Japanese papermaking. 
Stephanie’s latest departure is a forthcoming third installment of her fragrance line — her selenite fragrance. Made from plant-based essential oils, it evokes soft florals with mandarin and vanilla notes and is housed inside a unique selenite crystal, complete with silver spray top with cap.

The reception for her latest installation — “Sounds in 6 Cities" — happens tonight in Portland at PSU’s Littman Gallery, running now through May 28.

Portrait by Isao Nishiyama.

Portland, OR

Dilettante’s not a word you’d normally conjure up to compliment. But there’s something in Stephanie Simek's restless digressions that makes the idea of artful inexperience seem kind of revolutionary. Her muse sends her headlong into arcane and circuitous studies of natural science — flirting with botany, circuitry, crystallography, electro-magnetics, phosphorescent algae husbandry — self-sufficient sojourns into worlds wading just deep enough for her exquisite purposes.

"Radio Room," a functional, gallery-sized crystal radio composed of copper, fool’s gold, steel and paper. 

Her work’s got a wide breadth — spread out across sound art, conceptual fine art, a fantastical jewelry line and most recently her own line of fragrances. She’s made circuitry triggered by the behavior of venus flytraps, quail eggs lined with gold, a room-sized radio made from copper and crystals, a strangely well-publicized eyelash necklace made from human hair and countless other curios. In everything, Stephanie’s tactile creations share a common curiosity with the wonders of the natural world — an imaginative distillation of scientific complexities into their most elemental forms. 

Necklace sculpted from the Mitsumata branch, traditionally used in Japanese papermaking. 

Stephanie’s latest departure is a forthcoming third installment of her fragrance line — her selenite fragranceMade from plant-based essential oils, it evokes soft florals with mandarin and vanilla notes and is housed inside a unique selenite crystal, complete with silver spray top with cap.

The reception for her latest installation — “Sounds in 6 Cities" — happens tonight in Portland at PSU’s Littman Gallery, running now through May 28.
Portrait by Isao Nishiyama.

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