You have not grown too old 
and it is not too late
to dive into your increasing depths
where life calmly gives out
its own secret

― Rainer Maria Rilke
Swimmers by Wayne Levin.

You have not grown too old 

and it is not too late

to dive into your increasing depths

where life calmly gives out

its own secret

― Rainer Maria Rilke

Swimmers by Wayne Levin.


Portland, OR
Dilettante’s not a word you’d normally conjure up to compliment. But there’s something in Stephanie Simek's restless digressions that makes the idea of artful inexperience seem kind of revolutionary. Her muse sends her headlong into arcane and circuitous studies of natural science — flirting with botany, circuitry, crystallography, electro-magnetics, phosphorescent algae husbandry — self-sufficient sojourns into worlds wading just deep enough for her exquisite purposes.

"Radio Room," a functional, gallery-sized crystal radio composed of copper, fool’s gold, steel and paper. 
Her work’s got a wide breadth — spread out across sound art, conceptual fine art, a fantastical jewelry line and most recently her own line of fragrances. She’s made circuitry triggered by the behavior of venus flytraps, quail eggs lined with gold, a room-sized radio made from copper and crystals, a strangely well-publicized eyelash necklace made from human hair and countless other curios. In everything, Stephanie’s tactile creations share a common curiosity with the wonders of the natural world — an imaginative distillation of scientific complexities into their most elemental forms. 

Necklace sculpted from the Mitsumata branch, traditionally used in Japanese papermaking. 
Stephanie’s latest departure is a forthcoming third installment of her fragrance line — her selenite fragrance. Made from plant-based essential oils, it evokes soft florals with mandarin and vanilla notes and is housed inside a unique selenite crystal, complete with silver spray top with cap.

The reception for her latest installation — “Sounds in 6 Cities" — happens tonight in Portland at PSU’s Littman Gallery, running now through May 28.

Portrait by Isao Nishiyama.

Portland, OR

Dilettante’s not a word you’d normally conjure up to compliment. But there’s something in Stephanie Simek's restless digressions that makes the idea of artful inexperience seem kind of revolutionary. Her muse sends her headlong into arcane and circuitous studies of natural science — flirting with botany, circuitry, crystallography, electro-magnetics, phosphorescent algae husbandry — self-sufficient sojourns into worlds wading just deep enough for her exquisite purposes.

"Radio Room," a functional, gallery-sized crystal radio composed of copper, fool’s gold, steel and paper. 

Her work’s got a wide breadth — spread out across sound art, conceptual fine art, a fantastical jewelry line and most recently her own line of fragrances. She’s made circuitry triggered by the behavior of venus flytraps, quail eggs lined with gold, a room-sized radio made from copper and crystals, a strangely well-publicized eyelash necklace made from human hair and countless other curios. In everything, Stephanie’s tactile creations share a common curiosity with the wonders of the natural world — an imaginative distillation of scientific complexities into their most elemental forms. 

Necklace sculpted from the Mitsumata branch, traditionally used in Japanese papermaking. 

Stephanie’s latest departure is a forthcoming third installment of her fragrance line — her selenite fragranceMade from plant-based essential oils, it evokes soft florals with mandarin and vanilla notes and is housed inside a unique selenite crystal, complete with silver spray top with cap.

The reception for her latest installation — “Sounds in 6 Cities" — happens tonight in Portland at PSU’s Littman Gallery, running now through May 28.
Portrait by Isao Nishiyama.

Space centennial.


“The traveler sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see.” – G. K. Chesterton
Travel writing is more often than not an exercise in eloquent cataloging — talking about place in terms of its attainable landmarks more than its essence. It’s florid adjectives for the quaint little restaurant that you’ve got to make time for — and if you travel just a little off the beaten path to this bazaar you’ll get a taste of the real flavor of the city. Nowhere Magazine knows better. They know that travel isn’t checklists and rough guides. It’s more ephemeral than that. 
The best bits of Nowhere read like diary entries from time-worm pilgrimages, written more for personal record than purpose. They’ve got a way of framing things that turn even well-worn yarns like the Lewis and Clark expedition into page-turners. Do yourself a favor and have a look at Issue 10.

“The traveler sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see.” – G. K. Chesterton

Travel writing is more often than not an exercise in eloquent cataloging — talking about place in terms of its attainable landmarks more than its essence. It’s florid adjectives for the quaint little restaurant that you’ve got to make time for — and if you travel just a little off the beaten path to this bazaar you’ll get a taste of the real flavor of the city. Nowhere Magazine knows better. They know that travel isn’t checklists and rough guides. It’s more ephemeral than that.

The best bits of Nowhere read like diary entries from time-worm pilgrimages, written more for personal record than purpose. They’ve got a way of framing things that turn even well-worn yarns like the Lewis and Clark expedition into page-turners. Do yourself a favor and have a look at Issue 10.


Downtown Los Angeles

Last night in LA, Swedish siren Lykke Li enchanted a sold out audience at The Theatre, and we’re still basking in the glow of her spell. We’ve been waiting months for this moment, and L.L.’s command of the space was awe-inspiring — the elegant bluster of her voice convincingly taking over every corner of the house. Think we might have fallen a little bit more in love with you, Lykke Li. Is it too soon to do it again?

Photos by Makiko Wakita.


London, UK


Photos from Derek Ridgers' book 78-87 London Youth.

London, UK

Photos from Derek Ridgers' book 78-87 London Youth.


Downtown Los Angeles
There’s some serious herstory in the making tonight, you guys. After two weeks of sitting on our hot little hands, the season finale of RuPaul’s Drag Race — shot in The Theatre at Ace Hotel Downtown — finally goes out to the world. 
We know, we know — the wait’s been killing us, too. If you can’t hardly stand it, here’s a quick sneak peak. Get an eyeful of our beloved Theatre when RuPaul’s Drag Race Reunited airs tonight on Logo. 
Oh, and in case you hadn’t heard: the West just got a little more civilized. The best kind of baby steps, baby. 
Photo by Maggie Stoody

Downtown Los Angeles

There’s some serious herstory in the making tonight, you guys. After two weeks of sitting on our hot little hands, the season finale of RuPaul’s Drag Race — shot in The Theatre at Ace Hotel Downtown — finally goes out to the world. 

We know, we know — the wait’s been killing us, too. If you can’t hardly stand it, here’s a quick sneak peak. Get an eyeful of our beloved Theatre when RuPaul’s Drag Race Reunited airs tonight on Logo

Oh, and in case you hadn’t heard: the West just got a little more civilized. The best kind of baby steps, baby. 

Photo by Maggie Stoody


"The higher up you go, the more mistakes you are allowed. Right at the top, if you make enough of them, it’s considered to be your style." — Fred Astaire

"The higher up you go, the more mistakes you are allowed. Right at the top, if you make enough of them, it’s considered to be your style."
— Fred Astaire


Flower pots by Isaac Nichols
Brooklyn, NY
In Greenpoint — just across from McCarren Park on Lorimer — there’s a quiet, nondescript studio space full of wonders. Our friend Cody Hoyt — whose solo show opens tomorrow in the gallery at Ace New York — introduced us to the place, where he and a close-knit crew of ceramicist friends are operating a miniature factory of earthen fineries. 
The work varies wildly, but Hoyt and fellow clay throwers Josephine Heilpern, Rachel Howe, Helen Levi, Isaac Nichols, and Natalie Weinberger are each uniquely firing (rimshot) on all cylinders — some functional and some elegant and some even a little rude. We’ll be keeping an eye on these kids.
Pyramid by Cody Hoyt
Raku platters by Natalie Weinberger
Fun mug by Josephine Heilpern
Gilded hands by Helen Levi
Moon phase plates by Rachel Howe

Flower pots by Isaac Nichols

Brooklyn, NY

In Greenpoint — just across from McCarren Park on Lorimer — there’s a quiet, nondescript studio space full of wonders. Our friend Cody Hoyt — whose solo show opens tomorrow in the gallery at Ace New York — introduced us to the place, where he and a close-knit crew of ceramicist friends are operating a miniature factory of earthen fineries. 

The work varies wildly, but Hoyt and fellow clay throwers Josephine Heilpern, Rachel Howe, Helen Levi, Isaac Nichols, and Natalie Weinberger are each uniquely firing (rimshot) on all cylinders — some functional and some elegant and some even a little rude. We’ll be keeping an eye on these kids.

Pyramid by Cody Hoyt

Raku platters by Natalie Weinberger

Fun mug by Josephine Heilpern

Gilded hands by Helen Levi

Moon phase plates by Rachel Howe


Shoreditch, London
“If constellations had been named in the 20th century, I suppose we would see bicycles.” — Carl Sagan
We started a proper bike gang in London with tokyobike. Every month we go trolling the Saturday streets around Shoreditch and beyond like some kinda Smiths video — led down cobblestones side streets by our man Duncan Riches, who seems to know a little something special about every corner of the city.

Duncan’s got the inside lane on secret spots architectural, historical and otherwise — this month he snuck us into Donna Wilson's creature factory for a behind the scenes pitstop. The three hour spin went by like nothing. 

Get jumped into the gang at Ace Hotel London. 
Photos courtesy of Yu Fujiwara from tokyobike.

Shoreditch, London

“If constellations had been named in the 20th century, I suppose we would see bicycles.” — Carl Sagan

We started a proper bike gang in London with tokyobike. Every month we go trolling the Saturday streets around Shoreditch and beyond like some kinda Smiths video — led down cobblestones side streets by our man Duncan Riches, who seems to know a little something special about every corner of the city.

Duncan’s got the inside lane on secret spots architectural, historical and otherwise — this month he snuck us into Donna Wilson's creature factory for a behind the scenes pitstop. The three hour spin went by like nothing. 

Get jumped into the gang at Ace Hotel London

Photos courtesy of Yu Fujiwara from tokyobike.


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