Flower pots by Isaac Nichols
Brooklyn, NY
In Greenpoint — just across from McCarren Park on Lorimer — there’s a quiet, nondescript studio space full of wonders. Our friend Cody Hoyt — whose solo show opens tomorrow in the gallery at Ace New York — introduced us to the place, where he and a close-knit crew of ceramicist friends are operating a miniature factory of earthen fineries. 
The work varies wildly, but Hoyt and fellow clay throwers Josephine Heilpern, Rachel Howe, Helen Levi, Isaac Nichols, and Natalie Weinberger are each uniquely firing (rimshot) on all cylinders — some functional and some elegant and some even a little rude. We’ll be keeping an eye on these kids.
Pyramid by Cody Hoyt
Raku platters by Natalie Weinberger
Fun mug by Josephine Heilpern
Gilded hands by Helen Levi
Moon phase plates by Rachel Howe

Flower pots by Isaac Nichols

Brooklyn, NY

In Greenpoint — just across from McCarren Park on Lorimer — there’s a quiet, nondescript studio space full of wonders. Our friend Cody Hoyt — whose solo show opens tomorrow in the gallery at Ace New York — introduced us to the place, where he and a close-knit crew of ceramicist friends are operating a miniature factory of earthen fineries. 

The work varies wildly, but Hoyt and fellow clay throwers Josephine Heilpern, Rachel Howe, Helen Levi, Isaac Nichols, and Natalie Weinberger are each uniquely firing (rimshot) on all cylinders — some functional and some elegant and some even a little rude. We’ll be keeping an eye on these kids.

Pyramid by Cody Hoyt

Raku platters by Natalie Weinberger

Fun mug by Josephine Heilpern

Gilded hands by Helen Levi

Moon phase plates by Rachel Howe


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New York City

During a brief break between the snow and cold of this brutal NY winter, Brooklyn based painter Rostarr braved a scant, sketchy scissor lift to adorn the recently installed scaffolding around Ace Hotel New York. 

My name is Romon Yang also know as Rostarr, I am a painter & calligrapher and I live and work in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn. I was born in South Korea and moved with my family to Washington D.C. in 1972, I arrived in New York City in 1989 to attend the School of Visual Arts and have called NY home ever since.

Standing outside the whole day watching you paint the mural was pretty great. People crowded around and asked a lot of questions about you, who you are, where you’re from, but the number one question was, “is it some ancient Arabic script?” Tell us about the forms, your inspirations, how this style came about.

My approach to calligraphy is abstract & gestural, similar to asemic writing, and often times iconographic and pictogram like. As a young boy up until art school where I studied Typography and Iconography design, I’ve always appreciated the beauty and forms of calligraphy from China, Korea, Tibet, Thailand and Arabic calligraphic masters, and similarly my appreciation of hand styles by graffiti writers such as Phase II, Rammellzee, Futura, Keith Haring, etc., it was a natural transition for me to go from abstract painting to abstract calligraphy and vice versa. I will forever be a student of the brush & pen.    

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Everyone was amazed at how quickly you worked, you did half of the scaffolding in one day. You don’t appear to make mistakes either, it’s crazy. You’re clearly a pro at this, how long have you been doing this kind of work, these kinds of murals? 

Yeah, it’s a bit crazy to think that I painted a 4 foot high x 350 foot wide mural in 2 days (to be exact 10 hours, but who’s counting). I’ve been very fortunate to have been invited to make murals and large installations of various types, indoors/outdoors since 1998, around the time I joined the NY art collective Barnstormers. Making public art is giving love, plain and simple.

What inspires you, excites you, puts you your totally chill and creative zone?

I find the most pleasure in the moment of painting where I get in the zone and start laying my lines and shapes down, almost like building a visual sculpture. I get inspired by visualizing a location or wall and its surroundings and try to solve the problem with what style will make the right impact. 

With this painting commission for Ace Hotel, speed was an important factor as I wanted this mural to convey the energy and flow of commuters passing by 29th street & Broadway, similar to the way a computer motherboard looks with routes, destinations and intersections.

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Seems like one of the benefits to being a successful artist such as yourself, is that you get to do some traveling. Where’s you’re favorite place you’ve travelled to and what made it special?

I feel so lucky to have travelled a lot for my art, some of my favorite places have been: Tokyo, Paris, London, Venice, L.A., Mexico, Puerto Rico and especially Seoul Korea. Being that I left Korea when I was just 1 years old, Seoul holds a special place in my heart and is a place that I’m so curious about getting to know better, in a short amount of time I’ve met so many talented individuals and good friends out there, Seoul is definitely the place to watch out for!

As with any scaffolding in NYC, Rostarr’s work could be up for 3 months or 2 years. We recommend checking it out soon if you don’t want to miss it: 29th & B’way.

Photos by Lauren Coleman. 


New York City
Alison Rossiter, “Acme Kruxo” circa 1940.
Rossiter, Sigmar Polke, David Benjamin Sherry and Matthew Brandt are just a few of the artists in the brilliantly curated “What Is a Photograph?” on view through May 4 at the International Center of Photography.

New York City

Alison Rossiter, “Acme Kruxo” circa 1940.

Rossiter, Sigmar Polke, David Benjamin Sherry and Matthew Brandt are just a few of the artists in the brilliantly curated What Is a Photograph?” on view through May 4 at the International Center of Photography.


The Oracle DJs —  Diamond Terrifier/Terrible Records — make their way to the lobby at Ace Hotel New York every Monday this month, celebrating the release of five different mixtapes where Punjabi rap, Tuareg desert rock, Azonto, Juke, Brick and a little bounce share aural space with jazz and classical outliers. We kicked off the series last night with the ‘Derealization’ Mixtape. If you’d like to give it a listen you can do that here, and the tracklist is just below. Stay tuned for tracklists from next week — and the week after that, and the week after that — coming up soon.
Up Next:12/9 - 'SCORE Remixed' Mixtape release party12/16 - Representing NYC presents a live performance by Zulu P and ‘It’s About Music’ Mixtape release party12/23 - Diamond Terrifier — Psycho Tropical Cancer Dutty Artz Mixtape release party12/30 - Diamond Terrifier — Co La’s 'The Subtle Body Wears A Shadow' remix listening party celebrating WIRE Magazine’s Radar compilation release

The Oracle DJs — Diamond Terrifier/Terrible Records — make their way to the lobby at Ace Hotel New York every Monday this month, celebrating the release of five different mixtapes where Punjabi rap, Tuareg desert rock, Azonto, Juke, Brick and a little bounce share aural space with jazz and classical outliers. We kicked off the series last night with the ‘Derealization’ Mixtape. If you’d like to give it a listen you can do that here, and the tracklist is just below. Stay tuned for tracklists from next week — and the week after that, and the week after that — coming up soon.

Up Next:
12/9 - 'SCORE Remixed' Mixtape release party
12/16 - Representing NYC presents a live performance by Zulu P and ‘It’s About Music’ Mixtape release party
12/23 - Diamond Terrifier — Psycho Tropical Cancer Dutty Artz Mixtape release party
12/30 - Diamond Terrifier — Co La’s 'The Subtle Body Wears A Shadow' remix listening party celebrating WIRE Magazine’s Radar compilation release


Ace New Yorker Natalie Lomeli captured our imagination with her proposal for a mural in room 424 at the hotel — and this is what she created. You have the key to our hearts, Natalie.


Dumbo’s LAND Gallery opens a special exhibition at Ace Hotel New York October 3-28, celebrating art by adults with developmental disabilities. Here, a vertical triptych by Michael Pellew Jr.

Dumbo’s LAND Gallery opens a special exhibition at Ace Hotel New York October 3-28, celebrating art by adults with developmental disabilities. Here, a vertical triptych by Michael Pellew Jr.


This past April, NPR Music collaborated with us at Ace Hotel & Swim Club during Coachella for two evenings taking turns at the decks with special guests The Embassy and a karaoke fight night. This month, they’re curating a well-read and winsome roster of selectors every Monday for Lobby Nights at Ace New York. So far, they’ve brought cohosts from shows like Microphone Check and Deceptive Cadence to play psych jams, hip-hop and far-fetched, deeply-researched noises in the lobby. Tonight, John, Eleanor and Josh of Ask Me Another are spinning what they humbly describe as “mega jams.”
Come by if you’re in the neighborhood for this penultimate friend of your brain. For the final evening next Monday, Microphone Check’s Ali and Frannie are back on the decks with NPR Music’s Events doyenne Saidah Blount. 

This past April, NPR Music collaborated with us at Ace Hotel & Swim Club during Coachella for two evenings taking turns at the decks with special guests The Embassy and a karaoke fight night. This month, they’re curating a well-read and winsome roster of selectors every Monday for Lobby Nights at Ace New York. So far, they’ve brought cohosts from shows like Microphone Check and Deceptive Cadence to play psych jams, hip-hop and far-fetched, deeply-researched noises in the lobby. Tonight, John, Eleanor and Josh of Ask Me Another are spinning what they humbly describe as “mega jams.”

Come by if you’re in the neighborhood for this penultimate friend of your brain. For the final evening next Monday, Microphone Check’s Ali and Frannie are back on the decks with NPR Music’s Events doyenne Saidah Blount. 


Giuseppe Penone began his creative process in 1968 in the Garessio forest of Italy, near where he was born. He is the younger member of the Italian movement “Arte Povera.” With work that seeks to establish contact between humans and nature, his new sculptures in Madison Square Park, “Ideas of Stone (Idee di Pietra)” are balm for the surreality of living and working in one of the globes most magical but challenging cities. Penone speaks this afternoon at Ace Hotel New York — if you can’t catch it, you can see the installation through February, 2014. Learn more about him at Madison Square Art Conservancy.

Giuseppe Penone began his creative process in 1968 in the Garessio forest of Italy, near where he was born. He is the younger member of the Italian movement “Arte Povera.” With work that seeks to establish contact between humans and nature, his new sculptures in Madison Square Park, “Ideas of Stone (Idee di Pietra)” are balm for the surreality of living and working in one of the globes most magical but challenging cities. Penone speaks this afternoon at Ace Hotel New York — if you can’t catch it, you can see the installation through February, 2014. Learn more about him at Madison Square Art Conservancy.


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INTERVIEW : JESSICA LAWRENCE

This commendable lady just biked across the nation from Portland, Oregon to the Atlantic Ocean this summer, with a brief stopover at Ace Hotel New York before she crossed the finish line. In a self-initiated tour de wellness supporting an active, grounded and playful lifestyle, Jessica has taught us so much. When she’s not riding the steel pony like a boss, she runs Cairn Guidance, consulting with public schools about health and wellness. Soon, Jessica will be celebrated by our friends at the Clinton Health Initiative and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation at the Healthy Schools Forum in Little Rock, in honor of the funds her adventure raised to fight childhood obesity.

We were really inspired by her journey and wanted to snag some photos of her in the photobooth and ask her a few questions, to which she obliged.

What was the moment at which this idea came to life and started germinating for you?

I was 15 years old and had just returned from a bicycle tour trip with other teens in Europe. I told my parents I would someday ride across the US. 23 years later, I fulfilled my dream.

When you first set rubber to road after your send-off breakfast, how massively free (and terrified) did you feel?

Three friends joined me for a few miles on their bikes from the Tin Shed Restaurant to the Springwater Corridor Trail. I remember my body was buzzing. Buzzing with excitement, independence and freedom. It was a gorgeous day. Once my friends left me, I remember looking ahead on the beautiful trail and thinking, “I’m doing this. I’m bicycling all the way across this country.” I felt more proud of myself in that moment than I ever have in my life.

Was there ever a moment where you wanted to give up? Who egged you on?

Of course there were challenging moments and days. My first challenge brought me snow in Montana (blog post entitled First Tears). My second challenge was in Kansas with thorns (6 flat tires in 2 days), 105 degree weather 4 days in a row and brutal head and side-winds. My third challenge was fatigue starting in the Appalachian Range for the last few weeks. These challenging days taught me to ask for help and reach out for support when I needed it. I might have been the one pedaling and carrying 80lbs of my own gear, but I never felt alone. Hundreds of people supported me, texted me, emailed me, posted about me, loved me, prayed for me, donated to my cause, fed me, hosted me, cheered me on and celebrated with me. A few people were there for me on a daily basis. My parents, Elin and Rick Lawrence, my personal trainer Aaron Sompson, at Kinetic Integration Manuel Therapy and Performance, Jamie Sparks, a colleague and close friend in Kentucky and Jamie Waltz, Alison Hansen and Ginny Ehrlich, all close friends. There was one day in particular I reached out to Aaron and cried. I was fatigued and didn’t know if I’d make it through the day. I rarely felt lonely as a result of all the people mentioned above.

Any revelations from the road?

Many. I would say my top three revelations include: 1. I’m so proud to be an American. I never want to take for granted how safe I felt as a female bicycling across this country (in spandex!) alone. We are fortunate that we live in such an amazing country with access to potable water and well-paved roads. Meeting Americans was the best part of the trip. People were unbelievably generous, inquisitive and supportive. 2. Laugh a lot. I loved the uncertainty of what my day would look like and where I would stay each night. It could be scary, stressful but also incredibly freeing. And, with that much alone time, you heal, process, reflect and laugh at yourself. Laughter played an important role on my trip. 3. My last revelation is the belief I can do anything I want. Doing something like this, as a solo female was the most empowering experience I’ve ever had. I’m incredibly proud of myself. Road to Rhode was a dream come true.


Tim Diet room art in Ace Hotel New York.
Photo by Ace New York guest, Lea Kaemerer.

Tim Diet room art in Ace Hotel New York.

Photo by Ace New York guest, Lea Kaemerer.


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