Portland, Oregon
Our friend Julia Gfrörer will be signing copies of her gorgeously macabre new graphic novel Black Is the Color tomorrow night at Floating World Comics. Julia’s funereal allegories are disarming in their austerity — bare-skinned and none-more-black tales of love and lust, all couched in quiet, dagger-sharp gallows humor. 
The signing marks the opening of Play Dead, a collection of Gfrörer’s work that’ll be on display through February 28. Black Is the Color is available now via Fantagraphics.

Portland, Oregon

Our friend Julia Gfrörer will be signing copies of her gorgeously macabre new graphic novel Black Is the Color tomorrow night at Floating World Comics. Julia’s funereal allegories are disarming in their austerity — bare-skinned and none-more-black tales of love and lust, all couched in quiet, dagger-sharp gallows humor. 

The signing marks the opening of Play Dead, a collection of Gfrörer’s work that’ll be on display through February 28. Black Is the Color is available now via Fantagraphics.


On September 6 we celebrated New York Fashion Week with the launch of the i-D Magazine retrospective, now on display in our gallery space. The ongoing exhibit showcases a selection of iconic covers from the always surprising, continuously inspiring magazine.

Started as a London street-style fanzine in 1980 by former Vogue art director Terry Jones, i-D quickly became a staple in avant-garde culture by challenging the imaginative boundaries of its contributors, speaking to a burgeoning and ever-more-connected global creative culture without losing any of that daring, witty and spontaneous British spirit that we love so much. A veritable who’s-who of past and present kings of fashion, photography and art were catapulted into international recognition in the pages of the magazine — and the opportunity to wink at the world from the front cover of i-D has become a coveted badge of honor.
If you find yourself in The City over the next few days, swing by the exhibition and take a look (pun intended) at some of Terry Richardson, Ellen von Unwerth, Juergen Teller’s best cover portraits. It’s free and open 24/7 until September 27.

On September 6 we celebrated New York Fashion Week with the launch of the i-D Magazine retrospective, now on display in our gallery space. The ongoing exhibit showcases a selection of iconic covers from the always surprising, continuously inspiring magazine.

Started as a London street-style fanzine in 1980 by former Vogue art director Terry Jones, i-D quickly became a staple in avant-garde culture by challenging the imaginative boundaries of its contributors, speaking to a burgeoning and ever-more-connected global creative culture without losing any of that daring, witty and spontaneous British spirit that we love so much. A veritable who’s-who of past and present kings of fashion, photography and art were catapulted into international recognition in the pages of the magazine — and the opportunity to wink at the world from the front cover of i-D has become a coveted badge of honor.

If you find yourself in The City over the next few days, swing by the exhibition and take a look (pun intended) at some of Terry Richardson, Ellen von Unwerth, Juergen Teller’s best cover portraits. 
It’s free and open 24/7 until September 27.


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WARM UP INTERVIEW : KIM ANN FOXMAN

Kim Ann Foxman performed last weekend at MoMA PS1 Warm Up 2013 in Queens, NY. Enter now to win a pair of passes to this Saturday’s Warm Up shows. Make sure to be quick, they’re a hot commodity round these parts.

What’s the song, producer or moment that propelled you from being a fan of house to a maker of house? What drew you to that culture before you became one of its producers?  

Growing up on stuff like technotronic and freestyle tuned my ear to love electronic sounds. I always gravitated towards that. Later came the rave scene, which was really exciting for me: it was so underground, so wild and so much fun. Moving from Hawaii to San Francisco, I really dived into that scene and I got really into DJs and started collecting vinyl and mixed tapes. I always loved to dance so much. One day in San Francisco, at a party, I took a break from dancing my ass off and I somehow got into a conversation with this guy. He mentioned that he made dance music, I thought that was really cool. He invited me over to see how we could collaborate if I was interested. So I went over to his studio a few days later. Eventually we started working together, I got my first sampler and drum machine. After that, I was hooked: we ended up as a  two man electronic band. We had ten shows in San Francisco… and then I moved to New York. 

American house music has its roots in New York, from the Paradise Garage, and in Chicago. Now that house is moving to the foreground of dance music in the United States in a sort of unprecedented way, people tend to associate the genre more with New York. What do you think of the current, possibly less appreciated, house scene in Chicago, and do you draw any inspiration from that culture in the past or present? 

That is true but I think that although there is now much less of a “scene” in Chicago for house music, people everywhere else are still inspired by the sound and acknowledge it, and there is a lot of respect. It may be a really small scene but the tiny part that is left of it is proper. And you can see that the roots are deep down in there although current trends may have shifted very much. I get a lot of inspiration from classic Chicago tracks and I play a lot of that sound in my Dj sets as well. 

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If you weren’t making music, what would you do for a living instead — in an alternate reality?

Something creative and fun. I am pretty open to creative possibilities: design, or have a brand of some sort. Maybe have a quirky venue, even. I also always thought it would be dreamy to do something adventurous, like documenting exotic places, new species and discoveries for something like National Geographic. At least I think that would be really exciting anyway. 


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