Milano, Italia
Every year during the Salone del Mobile in Milan, Wallpaper* Magazine puts on Handmade — an amazing exhibition of work from the makers and crafters of design, fashion, food and the magical.
For its fifth edition, Wallpaper* invited our Lovage team to set up shop and concoct three exclusive recipes, according to the meticulous techniques they’ve mastered in their Shoreditch juice and elixir bar at our London outpost. Handmade opened today and our peeps seem to have already adopted the Milanese accent. If you happen to be in Milan this week, come say hello and try some of our Dopo, Calma or Chiaro elixirs.
Handmade x Wallpaper*April 8–12, 10AM–7PMGalleria L’EcletticoVia San Gregorio, 3920124 Milano
Photo via Wallpaper*

Milano, Italia

Every year during the Salone del Mobile in Milan, Wallpaper* Magazine puts on Handmade — an amazing exhibition of work from the makers and crafters of design, fashion, food and the magical.

For its fifth edition, Wallpaper* invited our Lovage team to set up shop and concoct three exclusive recipes, according to the meticulous techniques they’ve mastered in their Shoreditch juice and elixir bar at our London outpost. Handmade opened today and our peeps seem to have already adopted the Milanese accent. If you happen to be in Milan this week, come say hello and try some of our DopoCalma or Chiaro elixirs.

Handmade x Wallpaper*
April 8–12, 10AM–7PM
Galleria L’Eclettico
Via San Gregorio, 39
20124 Milano

Photo via Wallpaper*


Shoreditch, London
"As an admirer of people who make things but not being an artist myself, being able to see our products used by artists, architects, illustrators, designers and getting their feedback is very rewarding and a privilege."
In the summer of 2012, our friend Julia opened Choosing Keeping, a specialty shop with all corners dedicated to the desk environment — regardless of whether yours is a place of work or creative escape.
Located on iconic Columbia Road — home of the Sunday Flower Market — Choosing Keeping offers a selection of beautifully-made utility objects, plus carefully-curated books and prints to stimulate the discerning synapses. 
Julia’s a passionate, adorable shopkeep — the kind that has us making increasingly regular excuses to stop in. We’re going to need to find some new pen pals.Choosing Keeping128 Columbia RoadLondon E2 7RG

Shoreditch, London

"As an admirer of people who make things but not being an artist myself, being able to see our products used by artists, architects, illustrators, designers and getting their feedback is very rewarding and a privilege."

In the summer of 2012, our friend Julia opened Choosing Keeping, a specialty shop with all corners dedicated to the desk environment — regardless of whether yours is a place of work or creative escape.

Located on iconic Columbia Road — home of the Sunday Flower Market — Choosing Keeping offers a selection of beautifully-made utility objects, plus carefully-curated books and prints to stimulate the discerning synapses. 

Julia’s a passionate, adorable shopkeep — the kind that has us making increasingly regular excuses to stop in. We’re going to need to find some new pen pals.

Choosing Keeping
128 Columbia Road
London E2 7RG


Shoreditch, London
Nights stay younger longer in Shoreditch lately. We got tired of stepping out for a spot of food just as restaurant staff were stripping back the cutlery, so Hoi Polloi's been celebrating us night creatures with raucous Midnight Suppers.
Thursday nights are set aside for our oft-unruly special guest Maitre D’s, with Fridays devoted to Hoi Polloi’s musical director — their radiant, Vangelian angel Xavior — who posts up at the piano each week with a new weapon in his arsenal of synthesizers. This round he’ll be exploring the outer cosmos with his Arturia Laboratory. If you can’t make it on Friday, don’t fret: Hoi Polloi will be happy to entertain you late, seven days a week.

Shoreditch, London

Nights stay younger longer in Shoreditch lately. We got tired of stepping out for a spot of food just as restaurant staff were stripping back the cutlery, so Hoi Polloi's been celebrating us night creatures with raucous Midnight Suppers.

Thursday nights are set aside for our oft-unruly special guest Maitre D’s, with Fridays devoted to Hoi Polloi’s musical director — their radiant, Vangelian angel Xavior — who posts up at the piano each week with a new weapon in his arsenal of synthesizers. This round he’ll be exploring the outer cosmos with his Arturia Laboratory. If you can’t make it on Friday, don’t fret: Hoi Polloi will be happy to entertain you late, seven days a week.


London, United Kingdom
Frank Stella’s “Black Series II" lithographs, Tate Collection.

London, United Kingdom

Frank Stella’s “Black Series II" lithographs, Tate Collection.


London, UK
Throughout the ’90s and early ’00s, American experimental music treasure William Basinski operated a now-mythical avant-garde incubator beside the East River in North Williamsburg — a studio and performance space that played early host to Diamanda Galás, Antony and countless others. Arcadia closed its doors for good in 2008, but London’s Art Assembly brought Basinski out to co-curate a series of Arcadia-inspired music and live art events in London — including a host of pretty spectacular shows at Ace London.
The mini-fest kicked off tonight and continues through March 20. We’ll be hosting several shows Downstairs — Basinski and James Elaine’s Melancholia film shorts, Julia Kent, Paul Prudence and more — plus Janek Schaefer's sound installation Lay-by-Lullaby will be posted up in the lobby throughout. More details are available at our calendar.

London, UK

Throughout the ’90s and early ’00s, American experimental music treasure William Basinski operated a now-mythical avant-garde incubator beside the East River in North Williamsburg — a studio and performance space that played early host to Diamanda Galás, Antony and countless others. Arcadia closed its doors for good in 2008, but London’s Art Assembly brought Basinski out to co-curate a series of Arcadia-inspired music and live art events in London — including a host of pretty spectacular shows at Ace London.

The mini-fest kicked off tonight and continues through March 20. We’ll be hosting several shows Downstairs — Basinski and James Elaine’s Melancholia film shorts, Julia KentPaul Prudence and more — plus Janek Schaefer's sound installation Lay-by-Lullaby will be posted up in the lobby throughout. More details are available at our calendar.


Krefeld, Germany

Joseph Beuys wants to kill your to do list.

Works from the Tate Collection, London.


London, United Kingdom

Now warming our lobby wall in Ace Hotel London Shoreditch, the meticulous artist craftsmen at Dovecot Studios have custom-woven us a stately tapestry — its eight distinct panels fashioned from an array of materials, including wool, cotton, linen, camel, and mohair.

Founded in Edinburgh in 1912, Dovecot built its reputation as a leading contemporary fine art tapestry studio — collaborating over the years on works with Cecil Beaton, Peter Blake, Graham Sutherland, Peter Saville, David Hockney, and Frank Stella.

True to Dovecot’s century-old philosophy, the large-scale commission began as a hands-on dialog between Ace and Master Weaver Naomi Robertson — a series of conversations that lead us to a unique gestation process. Initially taking cues from the principles of Bauhaus and the textile work of Anni Albers, we set out to honor the art and aesthetics inherent in the weaving process — incorporating a number of specialized, experimental and traditional weaving techniques to celebrate these inner-workings as the objet d’art in and of itself.

The project also served as a christening of sorts for Dovecot’s new loom, with both it and their tried-and-true apparatus working in tandem with each other to develop our pieces. Along the way, action weaver Travis Meinolf added his own bits alongside: fabric off-cuts, hotel documents and even locks of hair. 

Unusually, the suite was installed to reveal what is normally hidden — the reverse of the weavings — giving a unique insight into what lies behind the process. 

Details from a photograph by Andrew Meredith.


London, UK
Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London. Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.

London, UK

Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London.

Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.


London, UK
Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.

London, UK

Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.


London, UK
Beloved UK blog What We Wore is currently preparing an exhibition and book, to be published by Prestel in Autumn 2014. 
We met with co-founder and editor Nina Manandhar to chat about her hunt for the most captivating images and memories about style, and the social and communitarian aspect of one’s personal aesthetic.
The What We Wore Live Archive is in residence at our Gallery bar until tomorrow evening, where everyone’s invited to share their own images and stories about the perception of fashion past.  
How and why did you start the blog? 
'What We Wore' began as format on ISYS, the arts and culture based project and website, which is an exploration of British youth culture. Looking at image sharing websites like flickr a few years back, I noticed that there was a wealth of images that were for the first time being digitized and shared, and there was so much subtlety and nuance in them and the stories attached. The idea is for the images to allow people to tell their stories, to build a community around the stories.
Has your perception of fashion and style evolved?
Although the book is about style and fashion, the project aims to take you on an insiders tour of British youth culture and explore the notion of identity. Style is a key part of the way people belong, form groups, band and disband in youth movements and moments. 
Are you able to define the essence of British style by documenting its evolution between the 50s and today? If so, what is that essence? 
The essence of youth style is the way people reach out to each other to form connections. Style is the answer to an enduring need to affirm oneself. It is not just a British thing — it is the same for youth the world over, because this period of your life is particularly about defining yourself through what you wear on your body. 
Things are more hybrid and fluid now with style, but people have always flowed through scenes and movements. There is still reinvention, new identities emerging in youth culture, not everything is as off the peg as the cynics would suggest.

London, UK

Beloved UK blog What We Wore is currently preparing an exhibition and book, to be published by Prestel in Autumn 2014.

We met with co-founder and editor Nina Manandhar to chat about her hunt for the most captivating images and memories about style, and the social and communitarian aspect of one’s personal aesthetic.

The What We Wore Live Archive is in residence at our Gallery bar until tomorrow evening, where everyone’s invited to share their own images and stories about the perception of fashion past.  

How and why did you start the blog? 

'What We Wore' began as format on ISYS, the arts and culture based project and website, which is an exploration of British youth culture. Looking at image sharing websites like flickr a few years back, I noticed that there was a wealth of images that were for the first time being digitized and shared, and there was so much subtlety and nuance in them and the stories attached. The idea is for the images to allow people to tell their stories, to build a community around the stories.

Has your perception of fashion and style evolved?

Although the book is about style and fashion, the project aims to take you on an insiders tour of British youth culture and explore the notion of identity. Style is a key part of the way people belong, form groups, band and disband in youth movements and moments. 

Are you able to define the essence of British style by documenting its evolution between the 50s and today? If so, what is that essence? 

The essence of youth style is the way people reach out to each other to form connections. Style is the answer to an enduring need to affirm oneself. It is not just a British thing — it is the same for youth the world over, because this period of your life is particularly about defining yourself through what you wear on your body. 

Things are more hybrid and fluid now with style, but people have always flowed through scenes and movements. There is still reinvention, new identities emerging in youth culture, not everything is as off the peg as the cynics would suggest.


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